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Washington, DC suburbs in Maryland Calvert County, Charles County, Montgomery County, and Prince George's County
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Old 09-27-2012, 08:33 AM
 
75 posts, read 101,175 times
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Years ago many wealthy suburban bedroom communities were proud of their wealthy demographics and did everything they could to keep most of their population wealthy and well educated. Now that seems to have changed. Now previously wealthy communities are being forced to build housing for lower middle class folks and bring in a diverse population of ethnic minorities, immigrants and the poor. People now believe all communities must be economically diverse to be successful.

Well Bethesda and Potomac MD did not get the message because pretty much all the housing in these two communities is for the wealthy.

Do you believe that legally and morally these cities should change zoning laws to bring in more public housing and build homes for lower middle classes and lower waged ethnic minorities? If so, how should this be done?
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Old 09-27-2012, 10:08 AM
 
Location: It's in the name!
6,896 posts, read 8,717,798 times
Reputation: 3630
Quote:
Originally Posted by regular folk View Post
Years ago many wealthy suburban bedroom communities were proud of their wealthy demographics and did everything they could to keep most of their population wealthy and well educated. Now that seems to have changed. Now previously wealthy communities are being forced to build housing for lower middle class folks and bring in a diverse population of ethnic minorities, immigrants and the poor. People now believe all communities must be economically diverse to be successful.

Well Bethesda and Potomac MD did not get the message because pretty much all the housing in these two communities is for the wealthy.

Do you believe that legally and morally these cities should change zoning laws to bring in more public housing and build homes for lower middle classes and lower waged ethnic minorities? If so, how should this be done?
Find someone in Those areas who share your beliefs, start a grassroots campaign and get elected to the council. Go from there. Otherwise, those who are in office now were voted by residents who don't want low-income housing in those areas.

Or, talk to the Maryland state legislatures. It really starts there. People have to talk about it. Then they have to be convinced that a change is necessary. Tough road though.
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Old 09-27-2012, 12:20 PM
 
75 posts, read 101,175 times
Reputation: 81
I never said that places like Bethesda which I don't live in but visit on a regular basis for family should have poor people but instead wonder if a town like Bethesda or Potomac should be allowed to develop only homes for rich people.
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Old 09-27-2012, 12:59 PM
 
Location: Sneads Ferry, NC
12,788 posts, read 24,431,561 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by regular folk View Post
I.... instead wonder if a town like Bethesda or Potomac should be allowed to develop only homes for rich people.
There are already county regulations to require some developers to put in a percentage of affordable housing. I know one townhouse community in Bethesda which has section of houses for people like the teachers and firemen who work in Montgomery. They are considered "moderate income people". I think this is a decent compromise.

You will never get the county government to force developers to build for the "truly poor" people in Montgomery. There would be too much pressure against it. Frankly, the county council people have to get re-elected, and they depend on contributions from (guess who), the wealthy residents of Potomac and the developers.
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Old 09-27-2012, 01:01 PM
 
Location: Hyattsville, MD
304 posts, read 675,832 times
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Why should Bethesda have to open its doors to any and everybody. I'm by no means "rich," but I don't think that areas like Bethesda, North Potomac, Bowie, and Alexandria, should have to accommodate my lower income. You pay to live in the areas you live in. If I could afford to live in Bethesda or Bowie, I'm doing so under the premise that I'm living in a wealthy area and I reap all of the typical benefits of living in a wealthy area. As soon as you start opening the doors to everyone, you'll end up in a situation Montgomery County finds its self in now... they use to be in the top five richest counties in the national and now they're struggling for tenth place, and the slide shows no signs of stopping. No one is entitled to live any place. People who live in the entire Washington, DC region (for example) do so knowing the cost of living here is just about the absolute highest in the nation. If you can't afford to live around here, luckily for you there's 48 other states to consider. Maryland, DC, and Virginia shouldn't have to make sure lumberjack Dan and his family can live in an area that requires a median income of $130,000 a year.
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Old 09-27-2012, 01:01 PM
 
Location: NYC
7,311 posts, read 12,732,582 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by regular folk View Post
Years ago many wealthy suburban bedroom communities were proud of their wealthy demographics and did everything they could to keep most of their population wealthy and well educated. Now that seems to have changed. Now previously wealthy communities are being forced to build housing for lower middle class folks and bring in a diverse population of ethnic minorities, immigrants and the poor. People now believe all communities must be economically diverse to be successful.

Well Bethesda and Potomac MD did not get the message because pretty much all the housing in these two communities is for the wealthy.

Do you believe that legally and morally these cities should change zoning laws to bring in more public housing and build homes for lower middle classes and lower waged ethnic minorities? If so, how should this be done?
I think you've got your history wrong.
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Old 09-27-2012, 01:24 PM
 
Location: Alaska
3,147 posts, read 3,565,700 times
Reputation: 5460
Quote:
Originally Posted by regular folk View Post
Years ago many wealthy suburban bedroom communities were proud of their wealthy demographics and did everything they could to keep most of their population wealthy and well educated. Now that seems to have changed. Now previously wealthy communities are being forced to build housing for lower middle class folks and bring in a diverse population of ethnic minorities, immigrants and the poor. People now believe all communities must be economically diverse to be successful.

Well Bethesda and Potomac MD did not get the message because pretty much all the housing in these two communities is for the wealthy.

Do you believe that legally and morally these cities should change zoning laws to bring in more public housing and build homes for lower middle classes and lower waged ethnic minorities? If so, how should this be done?
What a bizarre question? Are you serious or are you just trolling?

If you can afford to live in a community, then you may decide to move into that community.

If you cannot afford to live in a particular community, then the decision is made for you and really, that's the way it should be.

You get what you earn. If you don't earn enough money to afford a million dollar home in a million dollar community, then you get one.

I don't have a million dollar home, and yes, I would appreciate living in one but, I don't begrudge those who live in one nor do I feel I'm owed one.

The same applies to the community. People who live in Bethesda or Potomac pay a buttload of taxes for the privilege of living there. Yes, it is a privilege to be earned, it is not a right owed to anyone.

So, to answer your question, I say no. The above cities should be mandated nor forced to build public housing or housing for lower-income people.

Now, before anyone starts calling me a conservative or a Republican, let me state for the record that I am left-leaning moderate (who tends to vote for the Democrats).
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Old 09-27-2012, 01:31 PM
 
75 posts, read 101,175 times
Reputation: 81
Not a troll and it is a common question in city planning circles. There was a push a few years ago to bring a large development right next to DownTown Potomac specifically for poor people. It was fought back successfully because there is limited public transit in town,


Quote:
Originally Posted by phlinak View Post
What a bizarre question? Are you serious or are you just trolling?

If you can afford to live in a community, then you may decide to move into that community.

If you cannot afford to live in a particular community, then the decision is made for you and really, that's the way it should be.

You get what you earn. If you don't earn enough money to afford a million dollar home in a million dollar community, then you get one.

I don't have a million dollar home, and yes, I would appreciate living in one but, I don't begrudge those who live in one nor do I feel I'm owed one.

The same applies to the community. People who live in Bethesda or Potomac pay a buttload of taxes for the privilege of living there. Yes, it is a privilege to be earned, it is not a right owed to anyone.

So, to answer your question, I say no. The above cities should be mandated nor forced to build public housing or housing for lower-income people.

Now, before anyone starts calling me a conservative or a Republican, let me state for the record that I am left-leaning moderate (who tends to vote for the Democrats).
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Old 09-27-2012, 01:33 PM
 
Location: On the Chesapeake
41,136 posts, read 53,464,075 times
Reputation: 55211
Quote:
Originally Posted by regular folk View Post
Years ago many wealthy suburban bedroom communities were proud of their wealthy demographics and did everything they could to keep most of their population wealthy and well educated. Now that seems to have changed. Now previously wealthy communities are being forced to build housing for lower middle class folks and bring in a diverse population of ethnic minorities, immigrants and the poor. People now believe all communities must be economically diverse to be successful.

Well Bethesda and Potomac MD did not get the message because pretty much all the housing in these two communities is for the wealthy.

Do you believe that legally and morally these cities should change zoning laws to bring in more public housing and build homes for lower middle classes and lower waged ethnic minorities? If so, how should this be done?
The above bolded isn't exactly accurate. What has happened in Montgomery County, and elsewhere in MD, is that developers who wish to build are required to provide a percentage of the new houses for what is termed "workforce housing" (the PC term for low and moderate income, usually moderate. People like teachers, police officers and firefighters.). In exchange for this set aside the developer is allowed to increase density (number of housing units) on the development parcel.
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Old 09-27-2012, 01:38 PM
 
1,107 posts, read 2,704,937 times
Reputation: 416
Quote:
Originally Posted by goldenage1 View Post
There are already county regulations to require some developers to put in a percentage of affordable housing. I know one townhouse community in Bethesda which has section of houses for people like the teachers and firemen who work in Montgomery. They are considered "moderate income people". I think this is a decent compromise.

You will never get the county government to force developers to build for the "truly poor" people in Montgomery. There would be too much pressure against it. Frankly, the county council people have to get re-elected, and they depend on contributions from (guess who), the wealthy residents of Potomac and the developers.
This.

Also, where are you going to build this? There is no room, and the county is heavily zoned so you cannot simply build whatever you want until the county government approves it. You can't even build a driveway w.o having the county approve the planning. Also, much of the space in Bethesda, both urban and suburban areas, is occupied.
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