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Old 12-16-2020, 08:47 AM
 
2,289 posts, read 1,568,841 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by terplandlord View Post
Students are flocking to my CP rental houses. They want out of the apartments. The reasons... expensive, no freedom, no fun, expensive parking, high density Covid and other germ super spreaders.

Cloudy future for all these projects. Not the least of which is the distance learning revolution taking place.
How many houses are you referring to?
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Old 12-16-2020, 08:57 AM
 
39 posts, read 49,703 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Very Man Himself View Post
How many houses are you referring to?
I have 3. Friends of mine have between 5 and 20. They are all seeing the same thing.
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Old 12-18-2020, 05:08 AM
 
Location: It's in the name!
7,083 posts, read 9,571,027 times
Reputation: 3780
Quote:
Originally Posted by terplandlord View Post
Students are flocking to my CP rental houses. They want out of the apartments. The reasons... expensive, no freedom, no fun, expensive parking, high density Covid and other germ super spreaders.

Cloudy future for all these projects. Not the least of which is the distance learning revolution taking place.
Online learning has been around for over almost two decades. Young adults are VERY social beings. Distance learning will never spread out. Especially once the vaccine is freely available.

Businesses benefiting from social distancing are doing well. No doubt. But their current profits aren't sustainable. Humans need interaction. You may have a few people who are spooked and will seek less dense areas. But for the most part, people will return to their old ways.

i lived on campus as a freshman through junior years and took online courses later in life. Let me tell you, nothing beats being in the classroom. And being around your peers.
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Old 12-18-2020, 08:39 AM
 
2,289 posts, read 1,568,841 times
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From today's Maryland Matters....

Quote:
Meanwhile, in a different kind of fight*for justice, students at the University of Maryland at College Park and Towson University are close*to being freed from their leases at apartment buildings owned by the Maryland Economic Development Corporation (MEDCO).

Unlike students in university dorms, who were able to get out of their leases for this academic year after COVID-19 hit, students who lived in the MEDCO-owned housing were being compelled to pay their rent, whether in-person instruction was taking place on campus or not.

The University of Maryland College Park is*planning to sign an agreement*with MEDCO to release students from their leases “within the week,” Carlo Colella, the vice president for Administration and Finance at the university told state lawmakers yesterday. Officials are currently “sandpapering” the edges of the agreement, Colella said.

Towson University and MEDCO reached a similar*agreement earlier this week.

The lack of flexibility in the midst of a pandemic infuriated students and their families*— and it has taken months to sort through the disputes.

“Seeing is believing,” said Del. Ben Barnes (D-Prince George’s), the chairman of the House Appropriations Education and Economic Development Subcommittee, whose district includes the University of Maryland campus.
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Old 12-18-2020, 01:23 PM
 
39 posts, read 49,703 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by adelphi_sky View Post
Online learning has been around for over almost two decades. Young adults are VERY social beings. Distance learning will never spread out. Especially once the vaccine is freely available.

Businesses benefiting from social distancing are doing well. No doubt. But their current profits aren't sustainable. Humans need interaction. You may have a few people who are spooked and will seek less dense areas. But for the most part, people will return to their old ways.

i lived on campus as a freshman through junior years and took online courses later in life. Let me tell you, nothing beats being in the classroom. And being around your peers.

The virus has pushed us over a decade into the future in 9 months. The public is embracing distance learning and work. The consequences haven’t played out.
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Old 12-19-2020, 08:17 AM
 
Location: It's in the name!
7,083 posts, read 9,571,027 times
Reputation: 3780
Quote:
Originally Posted by terplandlord View Post
The virus has pushed us over a decade into the future in 9 months. The public is embracing distance learning and work. The consequences haven’t played out.
The world has been through multiple pandemics. Ask yourself, how was the world in 2019 after all those pandemics? Distance learning existed in 2019 after SARS, Swine Flu, Ebola, Zika, etc. etc. How were people acting in 2019?

This pandemic, once it is over, won't change anything except awareness on how to effectively combat the next virus with social distancing. Also, telework may increase. But that was already on the rise with increasing traffic and commuting costs. This pandemic just accelerated what was already happening.

But before the pandemic, we've had multiple discussions on a migration back to cities and dense neighborhoods. People may run for the hills now, but they will remember why they left the suburbs.
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Old 12-19-2020, 06:32 PM
 
18,323 posts, read 10,663,943 times
Reputation: 8602
Quote:
Originally Posted by adelphi_sky View Post
The world has been through multiple pandemics. Ask yourself, how was the world in 2019 after all those pandemics? Distance learning existed in 2019 after SARS, Swine Flu, Ebola, Zika, etc. etc. How were people acting in 2019?

This pandemic, once it is over, won't change anything except awareness on how to effectively combat the next virus with social distancing. Also, telework may increase. But that was already on the rise with increasing traffic and commuting costs. This pandemic just accelerated what was already happening.

But before the pandemic, we've had multiple discussions on a migration back to cities and dense neighborhoods. People may run for the hills now, but they will remember why they left the suburbs.
LOL, remember yes, want to return , no
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Old 12-19-2020, 06:34 PM
 
18,323 posts, read 10,663,943 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Very Man Himself View Post
From today's Maryland Matters....
What isn't said is that they will lose the ability to save that spot /apartment for next year.
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Old 12-23-2020, 10:31 AM
 
558 posts, read 716,378 times
Reputation: 443
Quote:
Originally Posted by G1.. View Post
LOL, remember yes, want to return , no
If one prefers the fun of mixed use urban environments with bars, restaurants and grocery stores you can walk to before the pandemic, they're going to prefer that still once it is over.

By this logic, people think to themselves "gee, all the things about city life I used to love are no longer there due to the pandemic, let me rearange my lifestyle so that I can ensure I will never be able to conveniently enjoy any of those things again even when cities return to normal."

I am not saying nobody will change their mind about urban living, just to temper that it's probably not going to be a noticeable or significant change. Someone who is in their 20s is never going to find Shady Grove as exciting as Adams Morgan or Union Market. That's not to diss the suburbs, they are nice for certain stages in life and are definitely evolving to be more urban, but just to give a reality check to the urban abandonment theory.

COVID right now is far worse in rural areas, but you don't hear people screaming how nobody will ever go back to rural living post-pandemic.
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Old 12-25-2020, 05:37 PM
 
39 posts, read 49,703 times
Reputation: 24
The work from home revolution takes away much of the convenience of the city. Rural areas where properties sat for years have no longer inventory.
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