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Old 05-31-2011, 01:41 PM
 
Location: Northern Virginia
116 posts, read 213,155 times
Reputation: 69

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Quote:
Originally Posted by HurricaneDC View Post
Probably Swampoodle, also known as "the Anbar Province of the East Coast."
I think that you are a little late on that one.


I think that we would have to find an area that doesn't have an attractive housing stock and that is far from the Metro.

I can see gentrification spreading to Woodridge from Brookland in my lifetime. The housing stock there is fairly nice overall.
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Old 05-31-2011, 02:01 PM
 
Location: Fort Worth, TX
9,394 posts, read 15,716,724 times
Reputation: 6264
Obviously you've never visited Swampoodle.
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Old 05-31-2011, 02:46 PM
 
Location: Northern Virginia
116 posts, read 213,155 times
Reputation: 69
I've visited what remains of it. Unless there is another Swampoodle.
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Old 05-31-2011, 03:15 PM
 
207 posts, read 538,447 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mikeyo321 View Post
Interesting question. Obviously such things are completely driven by market forces so as long as there are more people who want to locate in DC than there is housing supply there will continually be housing pressures. Still, despite all of the hand-wringing over "gentrification" it's still a pretty good "problem" to have. If you don't believe me check out the hollowed out remains of Buffalo, Cleveland, or Detroit. Certainly plenty of cheap housing there.

That said, perhaps the LEAST likely neighborhoods to be gentrified, or become unaffordable, anytime soon (and of course "gentrification" is a relative, amorphous term) are probably the outer fringes of southern Southeast near Southern Avenue and the PG line (Washington Highlands, Shipley Terrace, Congress Heights which are also near the aromatic Blue Plains treatment plant), areas of outer Northeast like Deanwood and Woodridge, neighborhoods near the eastern edge of East Capitol Street and maybe even more westernly areas like Takoma and Lamont Riggs which seem stubbornly stuck in poverty and crime despite the nearby resurgence of downtown Silver Spring and Takoma Park. Given the booming population and changing perception of the city, however, there's probably nowhere that's "safe" from gentrification. Housing pressures and rising prices will continue throughout the city for the foreseeable future.
You had me until you said Takoma. Now if you're meaning the parts CLOSER to Georgia ave, well yeah okay I can almost see it, but travel just a few blocks back to Blair and Cedar and Piney Branch (heading into Takoma Park MD) and its a very quiet middle class area. Believe me, I've seen enough ghetto in my life and if this area looked anything like "the hood" I'd be somewhere else. But I must agree with you on the other parts.
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Old 05-31-2011, 03:47 PM
 
Location: Fort Worth, TX
9,394 posts, read 15,716,724 times
Reputation: 6264
Quote:
Originally Posted by Viceroy of Lost Umbrellas View Post
I've visited what remains of it. Unless there is another Swampoodle.
Let's just say the revisionists tried to cover up all of the troubled history of Swampoodle. You know the super tough thug types? The ones who run the crews and drug rings? Even they were afraid to step through Swampoodle without an entourage rolling 20 deep, armed with muskets.
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Old 05-31-2011, 04:46 PM
 
11,155 posts, read 15,730,651 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JEB77 View Post
Deanwood may be loved by some of its residents, but I don't see much about it - other than location - that might cause it to "gentrify." There's little about the housing stock to appeal to the yuppie eye, compared to places like Takoma, Bloomingdale, or Columbia Heights.

Not that there's anything wrong with that.
You seem to think the only people moving into cities are overpaid, transient yuppies. Deanwood would never transition like the inner city neighborhoods have, but I could see it going through a more gentle transition due to young families seeking a little more room at a little less price - similar to Petworth, Brookland or Anacostia.
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Old 05-31-2011, 06:30 PM
 
Location: Rockville, MD
3,546 posts, read 8,577,215 times
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If by "gentrify" you mean a preponderance of upscale condos, wine bars and frou-frou boutiques, the answer to the question posed in this thread is "many of them." You'll not see that kind of development in many District neighborhoods, at least not in our lifetimes. No city ever becomes entirely built out like that--even San Francisco and Manhattan maintain their share of seedier, dilapidated neighborhoods.

What is entirely plausible is that people go off in search of stable, affordable neighborhoods to live, leading to slow-but-steady growth in some of the District's far-reaching neighborhoods. Michigan Park, Deanwood, Hillcrest, Congress Heights and the like. But Deanwood isn't going to become Logan Circle anytime soon.
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Old 05-31-2011, 06:38 PM
 
5,125 posts, read 10,108,495 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluefly View Post
You seem to think the only people moving into cities are overpaid, transient yuppies. Deanwood would never transition like the inner city neighborhoods have, but I could see it going through a more gentle transition due to young families seeking a little more room at a little less price - similar to Petworth, Brookland or Anacostia.
You never know, but I think Deanwood would have to overcome quite a few hurdles to attract many middle or upper-income families (indeed, I'd expect a sizable number of the young families that move to Petworth, Brookland or Anacostia, each of which is more appealing than Deanwood in different ways, to relocate to areas with better schools if they have a choice).
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Old 06-01-2011, 03:06 AM
 
40 posts, read 95,780 times
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Riggs Park/Michigan Park/Lamond-Riggs. Far from shopping and nightlife, and the housing stock is downright ugly: rows and rows of identical red-brick boxes, built cheaply in the 1950s. As far as I know it underwent the earliest racial transition after being built (~5 years) of any originally-white DC neighborhood.

Last edited by kgottwald; 06-01-2011 at 03:16 AM..
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Old 06-02-2011, 10:06 AM
 
Location: Takoma Park, MD
56 posts, read 260,687 times
Reputation: 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Teacher383940 View Post
You had me until you said Takoma. ...Believe me, I've seen enough ghetto in my life and if this area looked anything like "the hood" I'd be somewhere else. But I must agree with you on the other parts.
When most people say "Takoma" by itself, they mean Takoma DC. When most people say "Takoma Park" they mean the MD side.

So yeah, Takoma DC is relatively ghetto. Look at some of the housing along blair road when you ride on the metro. It seems to be changing however, nice places like My Little Bistro have opened up on the DC side, they installed art in the underpass and even the liquer store on the DC side is not coated in bullet-proof glass and is nice, even if the outside looks shabby. There are some expensive apartment that went up there too.

Takoma DC is changing, which will in turn change Downtown Takoma Park. For the better, I hope. It seems businesses don't always survive long when they open there. If more affluent DC residents move to Takoma DC, they will wander into downtown Takoma Park and help businesses survive.

As for Takoma Park MD being ghetto, the apartments along maple avenue can be shady, but I just moved to Takoma Park and I don't know if those apartments are changing for the better or worse.
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