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Old 03-28-2012, 02:34 PM
 
Location: The Port City is rising.
8,868 posts, read 12,559,582 times
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basically, other than the old established areas in upper NW, theres gentrification of sorts happening within walking distance of every metro stop in DC west of the river, including brentwood and Ft Totten.
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Old 03-28-2012, 02:54 PM
 
Location: USA
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be careful of what u wish for..
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Old 03-26-2013, 12:09 PM
 
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Someone mentioned Lamond as a neighborhood that will never gentrify. I live right by the Lamond Rec Center. It's technically not Lamond-Riggs because it's north of Kansas Ave. The housing stock is similar though. Recently 2 houses have been gutted and are on the market for about $380,000. The previous most expensive home in the neighborhood sold for $320,000 in 2010. If that's not a sign of gentrification then I don't know what is. This area is less than a mile from the Takoma metro and closer to downtown old Takoma Park, MD. So it's walkable to all that. The houses were built in the 40s and are ugly boxes on the outside but at least mine has good craftsmanship on the inside. The only weird thing is that the walls are concrete covered with plaster and the door frames are metal. This isn't obvious until you start working on it. It's also very safe area though and I like my neighbors. I see gentrification as the sprucing up of a neighborhood. I don't know if a young white couple like my wife and I will buy either of those houses that are on the market. It doesn't matter though. They will certainly be people of some means. That will be good for the neighborhood. Maybe somebody will even paint their house one day!
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Old 03-26-2013, 12:56 PM
 
Location: Washington, DC
2,010 posts, read 3,458,574 times
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I show 35 residential properties in excess of 320,000 sold in Lamond-Riggs since 2010. Looks like prices have not quite rebounded to pre-crisis levels, but it has rebounded a bit this year.

I don't know the neighborhood at all; just looking at the numbers. Speaking generally, unless something derails growth in the DC area or effectively diffuses growth throughout the region, I think that gentrification will continue to spread to (relatively) affordable at a fairly steady clip as people look for housing stock they can afford.
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Old 03-26-2013, 01:35 PM
 
354 posts, read 785,135 times
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benning rd corridor from minnesota ave all the way to the southern ave
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Old 03-26-2013, 01:49 PM
 
Location: Mclean, Va; West Palm Beach, Fl
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The hood around RFK.
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Old 03-27-2013, 09:51 AM
 
Location: Baltimore / Montgomery County, MD
1,196 posts, read 2,529,363 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 3StarsHeights View Post
Someone mentioned Lamond as a neighborhood that will never gentrify. I live right by the Lamond Rec Center. It's technically not Lamond-Riggs because it's north of Kansas Ave. The housing stock is similar though. Recently 2 houses have been gutted and are on the market for about $380,000. The previous most expensive home in the neighborhood sold for $320,000 in 2010. If that's not a sign of gentrification then I don't know what is. This area is less than a mile from the Takoma metro and closer to downtown old Takoma Park, MD. So it's walkable to all that. The houses were built in the 40s and are ugly boxes on the outside but at least mine has good craftsmanship on the inside. The only weird thing is that the walls are concrete covered with plaster and the door frames are metal. This isn't obvious until you start working on it. It's also very safe area though and I like my neighbors. I see gentrification as the sprucing up of a neighborhood. I don't know if a young white couple like my wife and I will buy either of those houses that are on the market. It doesn't matter though. They will certainly be people of some means. That will be good for the neighborhood. Maybe somebody will even paint their house one day!
I hate Lamond Riggs with a passion and its mostly because of all those dudes around there trying to be gangbangers. My in laws like next to the rec as well and I stayed there a short period time and still go up there to visit often. It's location isn't bad, its right down the street from Takoma station and not too far from Silver Spring. The K2 bus only runs during rush hour and the F1-2 route operates on PG county time intervals which is terrible. The majority of the population is black and older (50+).
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Old 03-27-2013, 10:32 AM
 
354 posts, read 785,135 times
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Originally Posted by mcleanexec View Post
The hood around RFK.
not sure which hood you refering to but gentrification has already begun around RFK. i see plenty of white people walkin around there
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Old 03-27-2013, 08:19 PM
 
2 posts, read 3,253 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KStreetQB View Post
I show 35 residential properties in excess of 320,000 sold in Lamond-Riggs since 2010. Looks like prices have not quite rebounded to pre-crisis levels, but it has rebounded a bit this year.

I don't know the neighborhood at all; just looking at the numbers. Speaking generally, unless something derails growth in the DC area or effectively diffuses growth throughout the region, I think that gentrification will continue to spread to (relatively) affordable at a fairly steady clip as people look for housing stock they can afford.
On the home prices I just meant the area north of Kansas Ave where I live, not all of Lamond-Riggs. The neighborhood was called Takoma on official documents when I bought the house, it's home to the "Lamond" Rec Center, and it's north of Kansas Ave which is generally recognizing as the northern boundary of Lamond-Riggs. That's why I call it 3 Stars Heights. The architecture looks like Lamond-Riggs though.

EDIT: 3 Stars is a brewery that is located in the neighborhood.
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