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Old 02-06-2013, 02:01 PM
 
Location: Washington, DC
2,010 posts, read 3,459,112 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 11KAP View Post
^2 only if they want to sell out lol.
The long time homeowners in my neighborhood are mostly just happy the open air drug markets are being driven out (another big bust this week at the lincoln westmoreland complex) and the abandoned buildings are being fixed up.
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Old 02-06-2013, 02:03 PM
 
Location: Northern Virginia
116 posts, read 212,721 times
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I don't think that homeowners are in any danger of being driven out. For the most part, DC's property taxes are lower than they would be in the suburbs and there are exceptions for the elderly.
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Old 02-06-2013, 03:22 PM
 
Location: London, NYC, DC
1,118 posts, read 2,287,236 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 11KAP View Post
people gentrify the poorest neighborhoods only to make a quick buck and displace long time residents; nothing to cheer about really.
Capitol Hill is technically gentrified (and gentrifying in many areas) and is probably home to the most involved populace in DC. Gentrifiers actually have more at stake in their communities as they're first and foremost an investment based on risk. Not to mention that in many neighborhoods they're simply taking over abandoned buildings, so that's not really displacement is it.
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Old 02-06-2013, 03:32 PM
 
Location: USA
8,011 posts, read 11,404,247 times
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^ not exactly but what you are saying is still kinda half true.
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Old 02-07-2013, 07:26 AM
 
Location: DC
6,848 posts, read 7,993,664 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 11KAP View Post
^2 only if they want to sell out lol.
I find very few homeowners who don't pay attention to home sale prices in their neighborhood. Virtually everyone wants to sell eventually and they all love getting 2 to 3 time what they paid for the house.
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Old 02-07-2013, 07:35 AM
 
Location: alexandria, VA
16,352 posts, read 8,095,474 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by geoking66 View Post
Capitol Hill is technically gentrified (and gentrifying in many areas) and is probably home to the most involved populace in DC. Gentrifiers actually have more at stake in their communities as they're first and foremost an investment based on risk. Not to mention that in many neighborhoods they're simply taking over abandoned buildings, so that's not really displacement is it.
Thirty or forty years ago what are now known as gentrifiers were called "urban poioneers". People with some money moving into run down neighborhoods and rehabilitating deteriorating houses and fixing up the area. Back then this was considered a good thing. Now it's called "gentrification" and has mostly negative connotations. But what has hurt lower income people more are the "urban renewal" projects of the '50s and '60s. The Title I projects. Southwest DC is a good example. An interesting and lively (but run down) neighborhood that was completely leveled and replaced with sterile townhouses and apartment buildings for wealthier people. The lower income people got the short end of the stick and the neighborhood lost all of its' character and appeal. If the neighborhood had been left alone it would have gentrified but there wouldn't have been the wholesale removal of the lower income residents.
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Old 02-07-2013, 07:38 AM
 
Location: Baltimore / Montgomery County, MD
1,196 posts, read 2,530,047 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by smarterguy View Post
Tod?
Transit Oriented Development
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Old 02-07-2013, 07:43 AM
 
Location: Baltimore / Montgomery County, MD
1,196 posts, read 2,530,047 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LittleTavern202 View Post
Agreed except for the downtown parts of Anacostia. It has an old housing stock that will attract yuppies, has a great location near the highways and metro and river. Plus once barry farms is demolished the area wont be as scary to yuppies.

With the thousands of DHS workers coming soon to work there, there will surely be some gentrification near the commercial corridor. It might be one of the first mainly white MLK streets in the country haha.

The rest of SE EOTR will not be gentrified for reasons you mentioned. There is nothing convenient or hip about that area. suburban and not near anything. even the hoods in baltimore at least have corner stores nearby. parts of SE and NE EOTR you can't even walk to a store and have to drive or take a bus. and there are either large garden style apt complexes or tiny boxy brick duplexes. neither are yuppy friendly.

there might some random out of towners who wanta a bungalow in deanwood or house in ft dupont, but I don't see any full scale gentrification/displacement ever happening there.
downtown Anacostia has that urban village feel but the neighborhoods that surround it aren't walkable at all. Then you have two highways and an abandoned train track line and there are some pretty steep hills in Anacostia. Good Hope road is fully ghetto and is pretty blighted, lots of boarded up storefronts. Yuppie might be interested in the Marbury Plaza towers because they are high rises and give wonderful views but that's about it. The type of yuppies that EoTR could possibly attract are the ones from the south or midwest who drive everywhere. No one from NYC, Philly, or Boston will give it any thought.

As far as DHS, i don't really see it doing too much impact because the Census Bureau is in Suitland and its still ghetto.
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Old 02-07-2013, 07:52 AM
 
Location: The Port City is rising.
8,868 posts, read 12,562,134 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mahatma X View Post
. The type of yuppies that EoTR could possibly attract are the ones from the south or midwest who drive everywhere. No one from NYC, Philly, or Boston will give it any thought.

I grew up in NYC, I'm very focused on transit and walking/biking.

I work in near SE, and am frustrated at the expense of anything affordable close by west of the river. I would definitely consider historic Anacostia, but am deterred mostly by the crime.

In particular it would be good if the walk from the more historic residential area to the metro station seemed safer. I would also like to see how easy or hard it is to walk/bike across the 11th street bridge.


OTOH if a weakening local economy, and a pipeline full of new buildings, brings rents/prices down much west of the river, that would probably kill my interest in Anacostia.
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Old 02-07-2013, 08:24 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
32,108 posts, read 34,720,210 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brooklynborndad View Post
I work in near SE, and am frustrated at the expense of anything affordable close by west of the river. I would definitely consider historic Anacostia, but am deterred mostly by the crime.
Didn't you just point out the other day that a rowhouse within footsteps of the Potomac Avenue metro could be purchased for as little as $450,000? You don't consider that affordable?
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