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Old 01-21-2014, 08:46 PM
 
27 posts, read 28,551 times
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So I know this idea might sound crazy to some...

I lived in Washington, DC for about eight years and really loved it. I enjoy all of the political/policy/current event stuff, all of the culture and restaurants, meeting people from all over the world, etc. I felt very at home by the time I left.

For the last three years, by a strange confluence of circumstances, I found myself in Baltimore. When I initially moved here, I had high hopes that I would really like it here, that I would fit in, etc. But the bottom line is that it just hasn't really panned out. Baltimore is not a terrible place to live, and it's not as bad some people make it out to be, but it is so drastically different from DC that it is nearly impossible to compare the two cities. I also think Baltimore is a city where you "fit in" more if you are from here --- I'm not and have never felt like I fit in (it probably doesn't help that my biggest hobby is the Steelers and they are so hated here in Baltimore).

I work in Baltimore and there is no practical way for me to get a new job -- my current job is ideal long-term, even if Baltimore isn't. So I have given a lot of serious thought to moving back to DC, taking the MARC train, and just doing the reverse commute. The time spent on the train is not a complete waste -- I have the ability to do important work for my job on it. My office is located pretty close to the Camden station and I can take the circulator from Penn Station.

I guess my major questions are --

1.) Does anyone else do this?

2.) Has anyone else had this type of experience in living in both cities?

3.) If I do this, I would only live within walking distance of Union Station in NOMA. I understand the neighborhood is in transition, but I have found two exceptionally nice buildings over there and I feel like I can make it work.
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Old 01-21-2014, 09:16 PM
 
Location: Baltimore
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How is this even a thread?? move there if you like it
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Old 01-21-2014, 09:20 PM
 
Location: DC
2,044 posts, read 2,642,906 times
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The neighborhood is not so much in transition as transitioned. The buildings are very nice close to union station, it is not nearly as bad as it used to be.
With that being said DC is very expensive and getting more so. I would reconsider moving here unless you are seeking out work in DC.
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Old 01-21-2014, 09:38 PM
 
458 posts, read 594,864 times
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Most people commute to DC from Baltimore for work given how DC is so overpriced.
I've never heard of anyone living in DC but commuting to Baltimore for work, because the thought of that is just ridiculous.
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Old 01-22-2014, 07:37 AM
 
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The only person I know who commutes from DC to Baltimore is a doctor at Johns Hopkins (doesn't really have COL concerns).

You might want to consider Hyattsville MD. It's only a short drive or metro ride to DC and you have the MARC train to get you to Baltimore, and the COL in Hyattsville is rather low for the area. Houses are older, but there are some new townhouse communities that are pretty nice. That being said, you'll still have a suburban lifestyle, it will just be closer to what you want in DC without the DC prices.
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Old 01-22-2014, 07:53 AM
 
27 posts, read 28,551 times
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My job is such that I don't really have COL concerns either -- yes, DC is more expensive, but it will not break my budget. The very nice parts of Baltimore city are not necessarily cheap either -- but your apartment will be bigger.
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Old 01-22-2014, 07:54 AM
 
27 posts, read 28,551 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DrSloan View Post
Most people commute to DC from Baltimore for work given how DC is so overpriced.
I've never heard of anyone living in DC but commuting to Baltimore for work, because the thought of that is just ridiculous.

Four people from my office do it, but they all drive and live in the suburbs (Prince George's and Mont. County). I am not sure why it's such a crazy idea if you have a great job in Baltimore that you do not want to give up, but you don't like living in Baltimore.
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Old 01-22-2014, 08:36 AM
 
Location: DC
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I used to know someone who lived in DC and commuted up to Baltimore (or the Baltimore area, not sure). Money wasn't a big issue for them, his wife worked in DC, and they preferred living in Adams Morgan so he would drive up to Baltimore for work.

Unfortunately I don't have much more insight than that, but if the cost of living change isn't a problem for you and you really want to live in DC, then it's doable. It's a less common option, largely due to things being cheaper in Baltimore, but I don't think it's insane.
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Old 01-22-2014, 10:09 AM
 
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Go for it. But would your great job in Baltimore support an expensive place to live in DC? At least the train won't be crowded in the morning.

I do understand not fitting in. I am not from Baltimore either but from DC and when I lived in Baltimore I didn't fit it in at all. It is easier if you are from there to live there, and (curses) I am a Redskin fan. So you know how great that went over, lol.
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Old 01-22-2014, 11:01 AM
 
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One of my old co-workers used to do the opposite actually - he'd take the train in from Baltimore to DC, then metro to Arlington, VA every day. He finally ended up moving to DC because the commute was just getting to be a bit too much for him. He had friends in both DC and Baltimore, so socially he could have gone either way.

For me personally I have a very short tolerance for long commutes, but as long as you don't mind the train ride, why not go for it?
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