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Old 06-21-2016, 09:20 AM
 
Location: Washington D.C.
13,672 posts, read 15,539,253 times
Reputation: 4048

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HUD is about to change Section 8 voucher rental prices to align with individual zip codes. This has HUGE implications for redevelopment in ward 7 and ward 8. Many slumlords in these wards purchase property with the intent of renting to section 8 tenants. They get the metro area standard rate which is the same across the region and make way more than the free market in those neighborhoods would provide. This keeps market rate redevelopment from happening because the value developers can get off of section 8 renters from the government is so much higher than renting to market rate renters.

With this change by HUD, not only will section 8 renters be able to rent in wealthier area's around the region which will help to decentralize poverty, this will also remove the incentive developers have in targeting Section 8 renters in low income neighborhoods. I have been talking about investment across the river in ward 7 and ward 8 in the form of house flipping happening everywhere. This will target the condo market.

Condo's across the river are distressed largely because of the concentration of Section 8 renters. Condo owners have the ability to command over $1,600 for a two bedroom unit which they would not be able to get from a market rate tenant. Those days are coming to an end now. Rents will drop dramatically for Section 8 renters in ward 7 and ward 8 to align with market rate units in the area.


https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...neighborhoods/
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Old 06-21-2016, 01:37 PM
 
Location: USA
8,012 posts, read 11,334,125 times
Reputation: 3454
That doesn't sound right. What you mean is the developers want to take over the poorer areas and strip the working and lower classes from them, then move in the upper middle class who will pay way more.
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Old 06-21-2016, 06:44 PM
 
2,685 posts, read 2,503,673 times
Reputation: 1856
Quote:
Originally Posted by 11KAP View Post
That doesn't sound right. What you mean is the developers want to take over the poorer areas and strip the working and lower classes from them, then move in the upper middle class who will pay way more.
Agree.

This is probably what will ultimately happen and what the true goal is. In order to avoid major backlash and protest from DC residents.. laws and codes are often changed subtly with a false marketing message claiming the change will "help [insert group] people". But the true intention is to make $$$ like all things in the U.S.

The goal supported by big business and the U.S. Government is to make DC a world class capital city. This plan first went into effect in the 90's and nothing is going to stop it. Encouraging new construction and trying to entice middle-class people to move into DC has been the official policy of the city under at least its last five mayors... Marion Barry (on his second go-round), Anthony Williams, Adrian Fenty, Vincent Gray and Muriel Bowser. The main driver from the start was the city's need to broaden its tax base and stop population outflow.

This is not something that is going to stop anytime soon for several reasons. The main and most obvious reason is higher income people can pay more taxes and that means more $$$ for the city. Therefore, bringing more and more higher income people into DC and keeping them "happy" so they can pay taxes and spend $$$ on rent, food, entertainment, etc. is all anyone cares about.

This is why I argue with people who say gentrification is about race. It is 100% about money and always has been.
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Old 06-21-2016, 07:56 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C.
13,672 posts, read 15,539,253 times
Reputation: 4048
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chriz Brown View Post
Agree.

This is probably what will ultimately happen and what the true goal is. In order to avoid major backlash and protest from DC residents.. laws and codes are often changed subtly with a false marketing message claiming the change will "help [insert group] people". But the true intention is to make $$$ like all things in the U.S.

The goal supported by big business and the U.S. Government is to make DC a world class capital city. This plan first went into effect in the 90's and nothing is going to stop it. Encouraging new construction and trying to entice middle-class people to move into DC has been the official policy of the city under at least its last five mayors... Marion Barry (on his second go-round), Anthony Williams, Adrian Fenty, Vincent Gray and Muriel Bowser. The main driver from the start was the city's need to broaden its tax base and stop population outflow.

This is not something that is going to stop anytime soon for several reasons. The main and most obvious reason is higher income people can pay more taxes and that means more $$$ for the city. Therefore, bringing more and more higher income people into DC and keeping them "happy" so they can pay taxes and spend $$$ on rent, food, entertainment, etc. is all anyone cares about.

This is why I argue with people who say gentrification is about race. It is 100% about money and always has been.
Lol....this is coming from HUD. This is a national change taking place by HUD. I know you and the other poster wouldn't know how this works and how the market is dictated, but private owners target Section 8 renters in low income areas nationwide because they can get top dollar. The fact that you didn't know this just highlights the lack of knowledge you have on the housing market in low income areas.

The mere fact that you think this has something to do with DC further proves what I mean. This is a national policy change happening for every city in the nation.
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Old 06-22-2016, 12:03 AM
 
2,685 posts, read 2,503,673 times
Reputation: 1856
Quote:
Originally Posted by MDAllstar View Post
Lol....this is coming from HUD. This is a national change taking place by HUD. I know you and the other poster wouldn't know how this works and how the market is dictated, but private owners target Section 8 renters in low income areas nationwide because they can get top dollar. The fact that you didn't know this just highlights the lack of knowledge you have on the housing market in low income areas.

The mere fact that you think this has something to do with DC further proves what I mean. This is a national policy change happening for every city in the nation.
Don't smug. The fact that you don't know that everything I posted is still 100% true despite everything you just said shows how little you know about the world in general.

Also.. the factors driving gentrification in DC are also driving it in other U.S. cities. I never said it wasn't.
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Old 06-22-2016, 09:09 AM
 
Location: Metro Washington DC
15,391 posts, read 25,590,654 times
Reputation: 10393
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chriz Brown View Post
Agree.

This is probably what will ultimately happen and what the true goal is. In order to avoid major backlash and protest from DC residents.. laws and codes are often changed subtly with a false marketing message claiming the change will "help [insert group] people". But the true intention is to make $$$ like all things in the U.S.

The goal supported by big business and the U.S. Government is to make DC a world class capital city. This plan first went into effect in the 90's and nothing is going to stop it. Encouraging new construction and trying to entice middle-class people to move into DC has been the official policy of the city under at least its last five mayors... Marion Barry (on his second go-round), Anthony Williams, Adrian Fenty, Vincent Gray and Muriel Bowser. The main driver from the start was the city's need to broaden its tax base and stop population outflow.

This is not something that is going to stop anytime soon for several reasons. The main and most obvious reason is higher income people can pay more taxes and that means more $$$ for the city. Therefore, bringing more and more higher income people into DC and keeping them "happy" so they can pay taxes and spend $$$ on rent, food, entertainment, etc. is all anyone cares about.

This is why I argue with people who say gentrification is about race. It is 100% about money and always has been.
Does it not become about race when you want to have gentrification everywhere except for that place where the black and/or poorer people live?
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Old 06-22-2016, 09:17 AM
 
Location: Washington D.C.
13,672 posts, read 15,539,253 times
Reputation: 4048
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chriz Brown View Post
Don't smug. The fact that you don't know that everything I posted is still 100% true despite everything you just said shows how little you know about the world in general.

Also.. the factors driving gentrification in DC are also driving it in other U.S. cities. I never said it wasn't.
My intention was not to be smug, however, you agreed with the previous poster acting like this is somehow a bad policy change by HUD. This is a long overdue policy change by HUD. The system is broken. Section 8 was created to give low income renters access to safer neighborhoods, better schools, and more amenities. The free market will NEVER provide affordable housing. That is the reality of a capitalist society. The ONLY way to provide affordable housing is through policy and government mandates.

The reality is the only possible way to revitalize low income neighborhoods and give all residents the same opportunities, regardless of their income or background, is to mandate affordable housing in mixed income developments. People get priced out because of capitalism. The free market dictates prices. If we want our cities to remain inclusive and affordable for all at all price points, we must build mixed income buildings which we are doing here in D.C. We need to build as many buildings with as many units as possible to provide enough affordable housing across the city. The more density we build, the more affordable units we will have. Period!!!

No neighborhood should be low income. All neighborhoods should have market rate high income units, market rate middle income units, and mandated affordable low income units.

That is the answer to our issues here in the U.S.
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Old 06-22-2016, 10:35 AM
 
Location: USA
8,012 posts, read 11,334,125 times
Reputation: 3454
Quote:
Originally Posted by MDAllstar View Post
Lol....this is coming from HUD. This is a national change taking place by HUD. I know you and the other poster wouldn't know how this works and how the market is dictated, but private owners target Section 8 renters in low income areas nationwide because they can get top dollar. The fact that you didn't know this just highlights the lack of knowledge you have on the housing market in low income areas.

The mere fact that you think this has something to do with DC further proves what I mean. This is a national policy change happening for every city in the nation.

That sounds like you just talked in a circle, because if you think HUD is really going to do anything for low income people other than continue to eliminate housing for them overall, there is nothing else I can tell you. I wonder why politicians took so many decades to act like they care about its own broken system anyway. Anyway tho, they will only help a small percentage of people at the expense of everyone else in particular neighborhoods; so that is not much.
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Old 06-22-2016, 01:41 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C.
13,672 posts, read 15,539,253 times
Reputation: 4048
Quote:
Originally Posted by 11KAP View Post
That sounds like you just talked in a circle, because if you think HUD is really going to do anything for low income people other than continue to eliminate housing for them overall, there is nothing else I can tell you. I wonder why politicians took so many decades to act like they care about its own broken system anyway. Anyway tho, they will only help a small percentage of people at the expense of everyone else in particular neighborhoods; so that is not much.
You're wrong sir. We can build enough affordable housing and then some. All we have to do is increase density through the comprehensive plan and zoning across the river. The more density, the more affordable units period. If you want affordable housing, you should be pro density.

Example:

Low income neighborhood with 2,000 low density housing units contains:

-high crime
-lack of basic amenities
-high poverty
-bad schools
-lack of jobs

Replace that neighborhood with the following:

-25 Mixed income buildings with 20% or more of those units set aside for affordable housing

Now you have a mixed income neighborhood with one for one replacement units for those previous 2,000 affordable housing units, but you also have the density and disposable income needed to attract retail, jobs and investment. The entire neighborhood could be redeveloped into a nice place for all.
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Old 06-22-2016, 05:53 PM
 
2,685 posts, read 2,503,673 times
Reputation: 1856
Quote:
Originally Posted by MDAllstar View Post
My intention was not to be smug, however, you agreed with the previous poster acting like this is somehow a bad policy change by HUD. This is a long overdue policy change by HUD. The system is broken. Section 8 was created to give low income renters access to safer neighborhoods, better schools, and more amenities. The free market will NEVER provide affordable housing. That is the reality of a capitalist society. The ONLY way to provide affordable housing is through policy and government mandates.

The reality is the only possible way to revitalize low income neighborhoods and give all residents the same opportunities, regardless of their income or background, is to mandate affordable housing in mixed income developments. People get priced out because of capitalism. The free market dictates prices. If we want our cities to remain inclusive and affordable for all at all price points, we must build mixed income buildings which we are doing here in D.C. We need to build as many buildings with as many units as possible to provide enough affordable housing across the city. The more density we build, the more affordable units we will have. Period!!!

No neighborhood should be low income. All neighborhoods should have market rate high income units, market rate middle income units, and mandated affordable low income units.

That is the answer to our issues here in the U.S.
You are living in a dream world.

Here is the truth about America: Things like HUD are a smoke screen. No one cares about keeping cities inclusive and affordable for all at all price points. And when I say "no one cares" I'm taking about people with power and $$$ who have the ability to dictate these things. None of them care.

And you are clueless if you believe building as many buildings with as many units as possible will make housing affordable across the city. Look at NYC which is a mega city and prices are still sky high. NYC is proof that building more (and taller) does nothing. More people will just move in. Simple.

You just don't get it.
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