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Old 01-04-2017, 02:14 PM
 
Location: alexandria, VA
16,352 posts, read 7,995,376 times
Reputation: 9726

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Quote:
Originally Posted by shooter2219 View Post
Not really.......id say the only VAGUE resemblances are.....

Bushwick - Trinidad

Bed Stuy - Columbia Hts in 2008 or Shaw in 2005

Atlantic Terminal Mall - the Mall in Columbia Hts
The architecture of Park Slope and Dupont Circle looks similar to my eyes, i.e. large Victorian townhouses with bay fronts and lots of gingerbread. Brooklyn Hts. and Georgetown: old waterfront neighborhoods on high ground overlooking rivers. Some similarities in architecture with the Heights being more brownstone and G-town brick. Both ridiculously expensive. Bed-Stuy and Shaw and Columbia Heights: older gentrifying neighborhoods with some similarities in architecture (Victorian row houses). Bushwick-Trinidad: struggling working class neighborhoods starting to gentrify. There are a number of neighborhoods in Brooklyn and DC that are comparable to each other, at least to my eyes. But I haven't been to New York in quite a few years so my impressions could be dated. I currently live just outside of DC (Alexandria).
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Old 01-04-2017, 03:49 PM
 
Location: USA
8,012 posts, read 11,329,261 times
Reputation: 3454
DC would be way overpopulated, if Anacostia (eotr) became its own version of Brooklyn.
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Old 01-05-2017, 12:56 AM
 
2,685 posts, read 2,502,362 times
Reputation: 1856
Quote:
Originally Posted by 11KAP View Post
DC would be way overpopulated, if Anacostia (eotr) became its own version of Brooklyn.
What is your definition of overpopulated?
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Old 01-05-2017, 07:57 AM
 
Location: DC
6,848 posts, read 7,929,117 times
Reputation: 3572
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sketter View Post
Please elaborate
Why would anyone be so silly as to think that DC feels the need to imitate anyone?
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Old 01-05-2017, 01:14 PM
 
Location: USA
8,012 posts, read 11,329,261 times
Reputation: 3454
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chriz Brown View Post
What is your definition of overpopulated?

Maybe like 500,000 or more people eotr, or something like that.
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Old 01-08-2017, 11:26 AM
 
3 posts, read 2,668 times
Reputation: 11
The folks here who are constantly trying to compare DC to NYC, or even Brooklyn alone, please stop. DC is a small town compared to Brooklyn, let alone NYC as a whole.

Brooklyn and DC are virtually the same size in square miles, 70 to 65. That's where the comparison ends.

Brooklyn's population is 2.64 million. DC's population is 670,000. Yes, Brooklyn has 2 million more people in the same space.

Brooklyn's population density is 35,360 per square mile. DC's is 9,800. Seriously, 10,000 per square mile is generally accepted to be to be the minimum to be considered an urban area. DC even falls short of that. Sure there are many DC neighborhoods that are urban, but for the most part, DC is suburban looking.

Kings County (Brooklyn Borough) New York QuickFacts from the US Census Bureau

Just please stop. It hurts my eyes to read these apples to oranges comparisons. If you need to compare DC to a similarly sized small city, try Baltimore. It's more comparable with virtually the same population and is a mere 40 miles away, so readers here are likely more familiar with it than NYC. My eyes thank you in advance for your cooperation.

Last edited by sports fan123; 01-08-2017 at 11:34 AM..
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Old 01-08-2017, 03:47 PM
 
Location: DM[V] - Northern Virginia
733 posts, read 1,096,034 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sports fan123 View Post
DC's is 9,800. Seriously, 10,000 per square mile is generally accepted to be to be the minimum to be considered an urban area. DC even falls short of that.
DC has gained an estimated 80,000 people since the 2010 census.

As of July 2015, DC is approximately 11,000 people per square mile for population density. Brooklyn is 37,000 people per square mile as of 2015.

I do agree that a Brooklyn vs DC comparison is apples to oranges. Just wanted to say that DC has seen a lot of densification and expansion of its urban area since 2010.

Thanks.
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Old 01-08-2017, 08:46 PM
 
2,685 posts, read 2,502,362 times
Reputation: 1856
Quote:
Originally Posted by sports fan123 View Post
The folks here who are constantly trying to compare DC to NYC, or even Brooklyn alone, please stop. DC is a small town compared to Brooklyn, let alone NYC as a whole.

Brooklyn and DC are virtually the same size in square miles, 70 to 65. That's where the comparison ends.

Brooklyn's population is 2.64 million. DC's population is 670,000. Yes, Brooklyn has 2 million more people in the same space.

Brooklyn's population density is 35,360 per square mile. DC's is 9,800. Seriously, 10,000 per square mile is generally accepted to be to be the minimum to be considered an urban area. DC even falls short of that. Sure there are many DC neighborhoods that are urban, but for the most part, DC is suburban looking.

Kings County (Brooklyn Borough) New York QuickFacts from the US Census Bureau

Just please stop. It hurts my eyes to read these apples to oranges comparisons. If you need to compare DC to a similarly sized small city, try Baltimore. It's more comparable with virtually the same population and is a mere 40 miles away, so readers here are likely more familiar with it than NYC. My eyes thank you in advance for your cooperation.
That means DC still has a lot of potential. People saying the growth is not "sustainable" are proven wrong right here. DC isn't even full. We can hold another million people or so in our borders.

However I disagree with the claim DC is a "small city". DC is a medium city. NYC is a MEGA city. A freak show. DC is small compared to NYC but not small in general.
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Old 01-09-2017, 05:43 AM
 
Location: DC
6,848 posts, read 7,929,117 times
Reputation: 3572
Quote:
Originally Posted by sports fan123 View Post
The folks here who are constantly trying to compare DC to NYC, or even Brooklyn alone, please stop. DC is a small town compared to Brooklyn, let alone NYC as a whole.

Brooklyn and DC are virtually the same size in square miles, 70 to 65. That's where the comparison ends.

Brooklyn's population is 2.64 million. DC's population is 670,000. Yes, Brooklyn has 2 million more people in the same space.

Brooklyn's population density is 35,360 per square mile. DC's is 9,800. Seriously, 10,000 per square mile is generally accepted to be to be the minimum to be considered an urban area. DC even falls short of that. Sure there are many DC neighborhoods that are urban, but for the most part, DC is suburban looking.

Kings County (Brooklyn Borough) New York QuickFacts from the US Census Bureau

Just please stop. It hurts my eyes to read these apples to oranges comparisons. If you need to compare DC to a similarly sized small city, try Baltimore. It's more comparable with virtually the same population and is a mere 40 miles away, so readers here are likely more familiar with it than NYC. My eyes thank you in advance for your cooperation.
It is funny to think that population density is someone's measure of a location's worth. I agree though Brooklyn and DC are totally different places. Brooklyn is a bedroom community for Manhattan and DC is the capital of the free world.
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Old 01-09-2017, 07:26 AM
 
Location: Washington D.C.
13,672 posts, read 15,526,230 times
Reputation: 4048
Did anyone actually read my post? This is a comparison of the following:

-A central core reaching buildout and the effect it has on development in areas outside of the core across the cores borders, which in this case, is a river. That is where the comparison ends.

The title of the thread asked whether Ward 7 and Ward 8 will be DC's version of Brooklyn for New York. It does not ask if Ward 7 or 8 will resemble or become Brooklyn. Infact, the only comparison made is whether both, being across the river from a major urban center, will see spillover development.

I mean, we have people talking about architecture, density, and neighborhood feel of Brooklyn neighborhoods in this thread. What does any of that have to do with the thread? Who is comparing Ward 7 or 8 or even the entire District to Brooklyn or New York in general? Almost every post in this thread has really missed the mark when it comes to comprehension of what was actually asked.
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