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Old 09-22-2011, 09:02 AM
 
5,041 posts, read 8,925,753 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jujulu View Post
The T is more reliable system than Metro. That's the one thing I miss about Boston
The T doesn't come close to Metro's daily ridership numbers.
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Old 09-22-2011, 09:04 AM
 
656 posts, read 570,638 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DC's Finest View Post
The T doesn't come close to Metro's daily ridership numbers.
That's exactly why it's better. And they dont' have this weird "stand on the right" complex there.
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Old 09-22-2011, 09:18 AM
 
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I love the T. It's not as crowded as the METRO and it goes almost everywhere and its so much cheaper. I remember you could buy a monthly metro card for a fixed price and ride as often as you want, DC doesn't have that option. DC has the SmartTrip which really doesn't give you anything unless you're riding the bus or want free transfers! I remember when I first moved to DC, I was lost one day and I was asking people where can I get the "T"? and everybody was looking at me like I was crazy, asking me what the "T" was lol. It took me a while to get used to the word "Metro".
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Old 09-22-2011, 09:44 AM
 
656 posts, read 570,638 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
WASPs are white anglo-saxon protestants.

Boston is mostly Irish Catholic...which are very working class.

That being said, there is an elitism with the Ivy League schools that do attract the country's elite and whatnot. So the education levels probably are very WASPs from elsewhere, as well as every other ethnicity and their most educated, etc.

From what I know, there is a distinct 'townie/local' provincial element, and a strong 'student/intellectual/wealth' divide...

In some ways, sounds like DC...but instead of local long-term blacks, you have Irish in that role. Sounds like Southie (or South Boston) has already become gentrified, pushing what was solidly Irish into cheaper suburbs.

Same things occurring to blacks in DC, but to poorer working-class Irish in Boston...
I don't know. There was something about Boston. The people's hearts were so, so cold. Even the Cambodians.
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Old 09-22-2011, 10:04 AM
 
Location: Macao
16,079 posts, read 37,996,354 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jujulu View Post
I don't know. There was something about Boston. The people's hearts were so, so cold. Even the Cambodians.
Is that in Lowell, MA? I read it's 16% asian there, mostly Cambodian.

But, damn, if a SE Asian turns cold, that's a cold environment!
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Old 09-22-2011, 10:11 AM
 
656 posts, read 570,638 times
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Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
Is that in Lowell, MA? I read it's 16% asian there, mostly Cambodian.

But, damn, if a SE Asian turns cold, that's a cold environment!
I don't remember where it was. All I remember are the hard hearts of the Bostonians. I went door to door, but no one would let me in.
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Old 09-22-2011, 10:13 AM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
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Maybe the cold weather has something to do with it.
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Old 09-22-2011, 01:01 PM
 
Location: Rockville, MD
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DC's Finest View Post
The T doesn't come close to Metro's daily ridership numbers.
Yep, a lot more wear-and-tear on the Metro system, more stations and miles of track to maintain, more (and deeper) escalators, etc. That doesn't excuse Metro's abysmal service right now, but it's not a particularly fair comparison between the two systems.
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Old 09-22-2011, 09:08 PM
 
Location: Macao
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Actually I've been google mapping Boston. Everything with a Boston address looks great. All of the suburbs though - looks like deteriotating roads and sidewalks, kind of old...not really 'walkable' at all, as New Englanders seem to suggest it is throughout the entire New England area.

Granted, they aren't Fairfax County suburbs...a bit more walkable than that, but not really desireable walkable.

For some reason, I was thinking most of the Boston suburbs would be one big Alexandria's Del Ray neighborhood. But, on google maps, doesn't quite seem like that.

Maybe someone who has spent more time there can clarify that or not....basically if the suburbs around Boston - like Quincy, or wherever besides expensive Cambridge/Somerville, are actually walkable and pedestrian-friendly in a Del Ray way....?
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Old 09-23-2011, 11:37 PM
 
Location: Beautiful and sanitary DC
1,653 posts, read 2,394,478 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
basically if the suburbs around Boston - like Quincy, or wherever besides expensive Cambridge/Somerville, are actually walkable and pedestrian-friendly in a Del Ray way....?
Del Ray is a classic streetcar suburb. Your best bet might be to find old streetcar maps and see where they went -- the classic counterpart in Boston is Brookline, which is also quite unique in America because it's still a streetcar suburb.

Although Boston has a pretty steep "density curve" in that surprisingly low density exists fairly close to the core, it's also surrounded by old country towns which retain some downtown fabric. Remember that it would have (had he gotten there) taken Paul Revere an entire night to gallop to Concord, which was a pretty substantial town way back then -- and a prosperous second-ring commuter suburb today.

Or, try the "heat maps" on WalkScore.com, great for quickly comparing walkability across broad areas.
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