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Old 08-12-2009, 06:45 PM
 
206 posts, read 1,078,355 times
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Hello,

So I read there is this Sequim and Port Townsend "sun belt" that has more sunshine. How far does the more sun-shine region go? Does the Port Ludlow area have more sun shine as well? How about Eglon?

What about the Edmunds, which isn't far from that area, does Edmunds have more sun shine as well?

What are the winters of Port Townsend and Sequim like? How often do you see the sun there?

How hard is it to travel from Port Ludlow/Port Townsend to Seattle and to the mountains on the Seattle side? Do people living there mostly just go for outdoors in the Mt Olympia region locally?

Thanks a lot!
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Old 08-12-2009, 10:32 PM
 
Location: Cosmic Consciousness
3,871 posts, read 17,098,015 times
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Hi, Wheregirl. I admire so much your wonderful optimism and determination to find a place in western Washington that has sunshine! But as everyone in all your threads has advised you, western WA is not where sunshine is. Eastern WA, yes. Not western.

First about Eglon, WA:
I've never heard of it, so I looked it up on Mapquest, then I Googled it. There appears to be virtually nothing there, not even a grocery store, and the number of residents appears to be zero, although that figure could certainly be wrong. To get climate information about Eglon, I would suggest you look up Kingston, WA.

Second: Sunshine in western WA:
So you can see this information clearly and quickly, I want to offer you this wonderful tool. I spent a lot of time setting it up for you, so you won't have to keep waiting for answers that might not actually answer your questions. It's City-Data.com's excellent data pages on every city and town in the U.S. for which there is statistical data.

On every City-Data.com's city/town page, scroll almost halfway down the page to see all the various climate information.

Here is the page for PHOENIX, AZ so we can see what the chart looks like for a place that really does have sunshine:
https://www.city-data.com/city/Phoenix-Arizona.html

Here is the WASHINGTON STATE page, where you can select any city or town for which there is data:
https://www.city-data.com/city/Washington2.html

Here is the SEQUIM page. As you can see, Sequim has:
-- less rain than anywhere else in western WA. On the "Precipitation" chart
-- just as much cloudiness (= darkness) as anywhere else in western WA. On the "Cloudiness" chart.
-- not actually much more sunshine than elsewhere in western WA, except for that blip in the second week of September when Sequim's sunshine appears 48% of the time. On the "Sunshine" chart.
https://www.city-data.com/city/Sequim-Washington.html

Here is the PORT LUDLOW page, and you can then compare it with Sequim:
https://www.city-data.com/city/Port-L...ashington.html

Here is the page for EDMONDS. Basically the same "sunshine" situation and "cloudiness" situation as elsewhere in western WA:
https://www.city-data.com/city/Edmonds-Washington.html

Finally, here's the page for KENNEWICK, WA, which is right over the Cascade Mountains on the eastern side of the state. It is a sunny place. Also hot, dry and windy. For comparison.
https://www.city-data.com/city/Kennewick-Washington.html


I hope this fabulous tool will help you to get a clearer picture of western WA.

Last edited by allforcats; 08-12-2009 at 11:46 PM..
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Old 08-12-2009, 10:33 PM
 
3,633 posts, read 6,169,865 times
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You can use this feature on weather.com to compare the average high, low, and monthly precipitation between any two cities. I entered Port Townsend and Port Ludlow to get you started; you can enter other cities as you wish. Because you don't see two colors for the average high and low temps on this chart, it means they're the same - the red circles for PT are just hidden by the blue ones for PL. (Those colors should be reversed, btw. )

Climatology Comparison for Port Townsend, WA - weather.com (http://tinyurl.com/pp6fk2 - broken link)

I'm scoping out PT as a relocation destination in a couple weeks. My friends who live there tell me it isn't really "sunny" very much. It's still overcast a lot. It just doesn't get as much rain there.
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Old 08-13-2009, 12:04 AM
 
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I live in Diamond Point, which is about half way between Sequim and Port Townsend. Sequim is more inland and benefits more from the rainshadow effect than the towns right on the water, which tends to have it's own weather ecosystem. Depending one what direction the wind is coming from, our weather can change. If it's coming from the west, rain and snow usually miss us, but we get a lot of wind. Coming from the north, a better chance of wind and rain. From the northeast or east, we have rain or snow. Port Townsend faces the northeast, so they tend to be protected from the eastern and southern winds. Port Ludlow faces east, so it tends to be even more.

This last winter, a lot of our weather came from the northeast which created a lake-effect type of snow and we had more snow than all of the other years that we've lived here (since 2001). It was quite unusual.

Because we are so close to the ocean and Strait of Juan de Fuca, which causes marine layers and wind, the weather between Sequim, Diamond Point, Port Townsend, Port Ludlow and even Port Angeles, can be very different. There was one year where Sequim got snow, but we didn't have any here nor in Port Townsend. Other times, there will be high winds in DP and PT but completely calm in Sequim.
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Old 08-13-2009, 10:32 AM
 
206 posts, read 1,078,355 times
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Thank you very much. This is the kind of information that I am looking for---from the people who live there. I know those site's statistics are way off from reality, just from where I live, the microclimates vary from place to place.

So when you have the wind from the west, then you have lots of wind and the sky would be brighter, right? Is that why locals call the region the "sun-belt", or "banana belt" (what is that nick-name for?)? Some folks say that region has more sun and some others say that area is just as overcast, is that because of the different locations those folks are at, or that the more sun is just a brighter cloudiness (which is perfect) or occasional days (once a week?)?

What are the different tendencies of the climates of Sequim, Diamond Point, Port Townsend, Port Ludlow and Port Angeles respectively? Thank you.

What did you mean by "Port Ludlow gets even more of that"---more of rain and snow, or sun or wind?

I am looking for a place that can have a bit of sun from time to time (blown by the wind?), just as long as not whole months without sun solidly, which of these places are better for that?

As a local, how much trouble is it to go from where you are to Seattle or Mt Rainier? Do you find yourself mostly just be where you are and don't go to the other side?

Thanks a lot!


Quote:
Originally Posted by eponabri View Post
I live in Diamond Point, which is about half way between Sequim and Port Townsend. Sequim is more inland and benefits more from the rainshadow effect than the towns right on the water, which tends to have it's own weather ecosystem. Depending one what direction the wind is coming from, our weather can change. If it's coming from the west, rain and snow usually miss us, but we get a lot of wind. Coming from the north, a better chance of wind and rain. From the northeast or east, we have rain or snow. Port Townsend faces the northeast, so they tend to be protected from the eastern and southern winds. Port Ludlow faces east, so it tends to be even more.

This last winter, a lot of our weather came from the northeast which created a lake-effect type of snow and we had more snow than all of the other years that we've lived here (since 2001). It was quite unusual.

Because we are so close to the ocean and Strait of Juan de Fuca, which causes marine layers and wind, the weather between Sequim, Diamond Point, Port Townsend, Port Ludlow and even Port Angeles, can be very different. There was one year where Sequim got snow, but we didn't have any here nor in Port Townsend. Other times, there will be high winds in DP and PT but completely calm in Sequim.
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Old 08-13-2009, 04:59 PM
 
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The area real estate sales people are the only ones using the words Sequim and banana belt in the same sentence.
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Old 08-18-2009, 10:31 AM
 
1 posts, read 27,335 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wheregirl View Post
I am looking for a place that can have a bit of sun from time to time (blown by the wind?), just as long as not whole months without sun solidly, which of these places are better for that?

As a local, how much trouble is it to go from where you are to Seattle or Mt Rainier? Do you find yourself mostly just be where you are and don't go to the other side?
Having lived in Bellingham for the past year, I can tell you that it is a good place to live if you are alright with the rain but cannot live with whole months without sun. It seemed there was a monthly (maybe even more frequent) turn of weather: weeks or periods of rainfall, heavy winds, and then a pleasant period of sunshine. This made for lovely PNW sights as the water would enhance all the beautiful colors of nature throughout the area. The spring and summer that are very characteristic of the northwest, combined with views of the san juans from chuckanut drive, make this area so attractive to people.

That was the best part of living up there, other than that I disliked it immensely. Too industrialized and lacking the simplicity, beauty, and true nature of western washington. Bellingham is so far away from the peninsulas, where I am from, that it made me homesick. I never want to be separated from this area ever again. I feel there is no better place to be - I have traveled a lot, to different states and countries, and could never call another place home.

Well sorry for getting off subject, I'm very passionate about living out here..

If you are set on living out here but want the ease of visiting seattle for a half-day or whole day trip I would look at Kitsap County. There is easy ferry access to jump the puddle over toward the cascade mountain range. Ferries in Bainbridge (35 min) and Bremerton (1 hr) take you to Seattle and the ferry in Kingston to Edmonds (30 min) just north of Seattle. If you would rather avoid the ferry prices ($$), and would rather not rush to wait in line, it is fairly easy to drive around. Take Hwy 3 South, which starts just as you get off the hood canal bridge, all the way to Gorst. Following the curve left, hop onto Hwy 16. You will have to pay a toll (under 5$ w/o a pass) which takes you across the Narrows to I5.

Once on I5, go wherever you please. From the areas in Clallam County you are interested in to the Cascades is about 4 hours. The ocean is over 2 hours away. As for making the trip to East-Western Washington, it can be made easily and often for Western Washington-ers.

I hope part of this is helpful!
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Old 11-14-2009, 04:22 PM
 
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I live on the outskirts of Port Townsend on top of a hill overlooking Discovery Bay. Like any state it is difficult to pin point exactly what the weather will be like year to year. I moved to this area in late 2003 and to me it seems that on the average, the summers are short, almost from July to early September. I thought 2004, 2005 and a portion of 2006 were beautiful years with plenty of sunshine. Late 2006 to 2008 were not so pleasant years for me with lots of rain or generally overcast days. There is in fact, little micro-climits even within Port Townsend itself. You could be down in town and its sunny. You get to the outskirts (about 8 miles out) and it could be cloudy all day. I know when I look at over the water toward the direction of Sequim, the sun does always seem to shine there more than others. I don't know what age range you are, but there is not much night life and the shopping in Port Townsend/Port Ludlow is pretty darn slim. Sequim offers alot more stores but definitely not a much as Silvedale which is roguhtly 45 miles away (kitsap county). It's the only place close enough for big clothing stores. So you might want to factor in travel, gas, time and the cost of food to substain your living habits. But, if you like the quiet life, dislike crowds unless you're looking for them, exceptional beauty and very friendly, down-to-earth people, this area is the way to go.
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Old 03-24-2010, 06:54 PM
 
Location: Little Rock, Ar
227 posts, read 728,121 times
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subbing this thread
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Old 12-10-2010, 10:33 PM
 
1 posts, read 22,986 times
Reputation: 13
You guys should take a look at Olympic Rain Shadow
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