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Old 10-18-2010, 04:33 PM
 
Location: Buxton, England
7,023 posts, read 9,709,684 times
Reputation: 3605

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Quote:
Originally Posted by RWood View Post
I should have put more emphasis on the "gentleness" of the days referred to - perhaps then the heat-obsessed respondents wouldn't have gone off at a tangent.
The guy clearly speculated that people in London would mainly find 21C/70F "chilly" to use the exact word.

Also, I'm not "heat obsessed". I like comfortable temperatures. I find anything below 21C too cool if I am sitting still. Now in my room it is 21.9C (as per my wx station) and 100% comfortable, wearing two pairs of underwear and a thick fleece. T-shirt weather, for me sunny and 30C. Quite warm, not "very hot" or anything of the sort. Everyone has a different range of "comfortable" temperatures, thankfully we are not all the same or "normal" as some call it, how horribly boring the world would be.
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Old 10-18-2010, 07:54 PM
 
Location: Perth, Western Australia
9,594 posts, read 25,185,604 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Weatherfan2 View Post
Everyone has a different range of "comfortable" temperatures, thankfully we are not all the same or "normal" as some call it, how horribly boring the world would be.
I'm not sure I agree.
I see no benefit in me being angry about the weather for most of the year.


It might be more fun living in the cold,
if everyone liked to make jokes about how rotten it is...
AND then "Room Temp" would be always be comfy for ME! (78-84 F please. )

It would be nicer in winter if everywhere was near 80 F inside.
Instead, it's usually tolerable temps dressed properly though it never feels "good."

Honestly, I don't understand why humans aren't more "reptilian" (temp preferences, moods) like I am.

"Enjoying coolness" makes no sense at all to me,
unless you're sick or you have been doing heavy excersize.
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Old 10-18-2010, 08:35 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
15,261 posts, read 14,986,769 times
Reputation: 6743
Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdCanadian View Post

It might be more fun living in the cold,
if everyone liked to make jokes about how rotten it is...
AND then "Room Temp" would be always be comfy for ME! (78-84 F please. )

It would be nicer in winter if everywhere was near 80 F inside.
Instead, it's usually tolerable temps dressed properly though it never feels "good."
Way too hot, IMO. The warmest indoor temperature I can tolerate during the winter is probably low 70s. If I have to go outside to cool off, it's too hot inside.

The only time of day I usually desire heat is when I get out of bed in the morning.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdCanadian
"Enjoying coolness" makes no sense at all to me,
unless you're sick or you have been doing heavy excersize.
Because cooler air is just more exhilarating and refreshing.
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Old 10-19-2010, 02:14 AM
 
Location: Bangkok, Thailand
2,688 posts, read 4,350,914 times
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I read that the optimum temperature for human health and comfort is about 20 - 25 C (68 - 77 F) with a dewpoint of 10 - 15 C (50 - 59 F). The World Health Organisation recommends an indoor temperature of 18 - 24 C (65 - 75 F). This is about my preference (although I lean more towards the upper end of the range).

I think there is a psychological component to one's thermal comfort -- a lot of it depends on what one is acclimatised to or their personal taste. I think a lot of people prefer much warmer or much cooler temperatures even though they find them uncomfortable because they find it an interesting sensation (in much the same way that some people like spicy food or tannic wine).

And then there are others who prefer certain temperatures / humidity levels because of a medical condition they have (asthmatics prefer drier climates, for instance) or a climate-specific sport or activity (skiers prefer cold, snowy climates; surfers like it warm and windy).

Naturally, there are also variations with gender, age, build and ethnic background.

Apart from these considerations, however, I really don't think that a climate's desirability is entirely subjective. We all have the same core temperatures and we naturally feel most comfortable in an ambient temperature that makes for a comfortable exchange of thermal energy between our cores and the outside world. Hence I believe there is a strong central tendency in people's climactic preferences. This doesn't tend to come across well on this forum however, as we mainly attract kooks.

You can get a good idea of what people prefer by looking at median house prices. Areas with more desirable climates tend to have higher house prices -- hence why southern California is so expensive and British developers have been buying up houses all over the Mediterranean. Of course, there are many other variables involved here.
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Old 10-19-2010, 02:38 AM
 
Location: In transition
10,587 posts, read 13,529,207 times
Reputation: 5020
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChesterNZ View Post
I read that the optimum temperature for human health and comfort is about 20 - 25 C (68 - 77 F) with a dewpoint of 10 - 15 C (50 - 59 F). The World Health Organisation recommends an indoor temperature of 18 - 24 C (65 - 75 F). This is about my preference (although I lean more towards the upper end of the range).

I think there is a psychological component to one's thermal comfort -- a lot of it depends on what one is acclimatised to or their personal taste. I think a lot of people prefer much warmer or much cooler temperatures even though they find them uncomfortable because they find it an interesting sensation (in much the same way that some people like spicy food or tannic wine).

And then there are others who prefer certain temperatures / humidity levels because of a medical condition they have (asthmatics prefer drier climates, for instance) or a climate-specific sport or activity (skiers prefer cold, snowy climates; surfers like it warm and windy).

Naturally, there are also variations with gender, age, build and ethnic background.

Apart from these considerations, however, I really don't think that a climate's desirability is entirely subjective. We all have the same core temperatures and we naturally feel most comfortable in an ambient temperature that makes for a comfortable exchange of thermal energy between our cores and the outside world. Hence I believe there is a strong central tendency in people's climactic preferences. This doesn't tend to come across well on this forum however, as we mainly attract kooks.

You can get a good idea of what people prefer by looking at median house prices. Areas with more desirable climates tend to have higher house prices -- hence why southern California is so expensive and British developers have been buying up houses all over the Mediterranean. Of course, there are many other variables involved here.
I think there is some truth to this for sure. It definitely depends on what one is accustomed to and also what kind of weather we think positively about. Growing up, I always loved the hot sultry days whenever I'd go on vacation abroad somewhere tropical and so I always yearned for that climate because it brought back so many good memories. I remember feeling the hot sun on my face, playing in the warm turquoise ocean waters and just having so much fun. I wished it would never end.
Moreover, I always hated snow and cold and felt it was a major nuisance and so I developed an aversion to this kind of weather. Every time it snows here, I get very depressed even though we only usually get a few snow events every winter but sometimes lying snow can last a few weeks or more in a very severe winter here. I often see people building snowmen and having fun in the cold here but whenever I think of cold and snow, I remember of all the clothes that my parents made me wear when I'd go outside and how cold snow is to the touch on my bare hand that it doesn't feel comfortable and of course nowadays, that nobody here knows how to drive in snow so you can't get anything done because the city grinds to a halt.
So, in many cases there is a psychological component as in my case for sure but I'm sure others on this forum have medical conditions too which make them prefer hot over cold.
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Old 10-19-2010, 10:46 AM
 
Location: USA East Coast
4,445 posts, read 9,218,861 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RWood View Post
Refer my reply to nei. You've missed the point as well. Alexandra has recorded temperatures of up to 39.7C in its history - such a day will never figure in my "ideal" list.
Keep in mind that any description of sensible weather ( “a certain gentleness to the weather “as you put it) is purely subjective. The point of my comment to nei was that he/she should keep in mind that acclimatized to is often overlooked in comparing the prevailing climate of one location to another. I wasn’t trying to say what climates might be desirable or undesirable.

I have spent most of my life in subtropical/warm temperate climates – where summer temps are 29/32 (85/90 F) are common, so for me a 21 C (70 F) is cool for summer (as it would to most people in the United States, central/southern Europe, Asia, Australia, Africa, South America...etc), am I “heat obsessed”? In November when daily highs are only in the 70’s (21/26 C) in a city like Cario or New Orleans, natives say how “cool “ the air feels…are they heat obsessed or have they become acclimated to their climate? In late December/January, I’m often in/near Miami/Bahamas and go swimming when the Atlantic sea temp is around 75 F (24 C). Most natives (or people who live in South Florida/Bahamas all year) would never go in the Atlantic if it was under 80 F (27 C) –are they ‘heat obsessed?

I have noticed that folks in mid/high latitude oceanic climates (London, Seattle, New Zealand…etc) seem a little touchy about the fact that most people would find their summer climates cool/cold…and that was my whole point: This is not at all to say the summers in oceanic climates are bad (many find the summers of the higher latitude oceanic climates “charming”)…rather that much of the populated areas of the world have become acclimatized to warmer summer temperatures/ then is typically experienced in middle/high latitude oceanic climates.

I think it's a bit narrow thinking to call someone “heat obsessed” just because they have become acclimated to 85 F summer days instead of a 70 F summer days (especially since summer temps in your region are not typical of what most people across the globe experience in their warmest season). Ones preference for temps, sunlight, cold, hot, rain, snow, etc while fun to read and even discuss… are totally irrelevant to what is considered a “good climate” or a “bad climate”.

Perhaps you missed my point.

Last edited by wavehunter007; 10-19-2010 at 10:56 AM..
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Old 10-19-2010, 12:13 PM
 
Location: Buxton, England
7,023 posts, read 9,709,684 times
Reputation: 3605
Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdCanadian View Post
I'm not sure I agree.
I see no benefit in me being angry about the weather for most of the year.
You don't agree that:
"Originally Posted by Weatherfan2
Everyone has a different range of "comfortable" temperatures, "

- which is what you quoted of me. But it's quite obvious, however, that people do have different comfortable temperature ranges.

As for angry about the weather, you are putting words into my mouth. I don't know whatever gave you the impression that I am "angry" about the weather whenever it isn't 30C+ and sunny, but you are dead off the mark.

I find lots of different weather/temperatures perfectly acceptable, depending of course on conditions, but my comfortable temperature range is a bit higher than most. That's all I was alluding to.

I see no benefit about being "angry" about the weather either, nor am I ever "angry" about the weather (I may have been in the past, but that's then not now). I find most weather types quite interesting whether of the hot or cold variety, so please, enough of the judgements about me and that goes for you too R. Wood, thankyou.
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Old 10-19-2010, 01:08 PM
 
Location: Wellington and North of South
5,127 posts, read 7,310,960 times
Reputation: 2595
Quote:
Originally Posted by wavehunter007 View Post
...
I have noticed that folks in mid/high latitude oceanic climates (London, Seattle, New Zealand…etc) seem a little touchy about the fact that most people would find their summer climates cool/cold…Perhaps you missed my point.
You've still missed a rather relevant detail - the story was about an Easter weekend in 1967 - earlier than average as it was Sunday March 26. That's autumn. The average daily highs in summer there are still "only" about 24C, but the clear air and rather dry ground on the hill slopes can easily give an impression of it being warmer. In bright, clear conditions with little wind my preferred temperature range is about 21C-24C. I suggest your automatic assumption that I was talking about summer underlines my point. If you want a more literary dissertation on "gentle" heat as opposed to what you like, read some of Bryson's stories about travelling in the US and elsewhere.
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Old 10-19-2010, 08:27 PM
 
Location: USA East Coast
4,445 posts, read 9,218,861 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RWood View Post
You've still missed a rather relevant detail - the story was about an Easter weekend in 1967 - earlier than average as it was Sunday March 26. That's autumn. The average daily highs in summer there are still "only" about 24C, but the clear air and rather dry ground on the hill slopes can easily give an impression of it being warmer. In bright, clear conditions with little wind my preferred temperature range is about 21C-24C. I suggest your automatic assumption that I was talking about summer underlines my point. If you want a more literary dissertation on "gentle" heat as opposed to what you like, read some of Bryson's stories about travelling in the US and elsewhere.
My point is unchanged… whatever the “season” has little to do with how folks acclimate to their climate /environment. Your preferred temp (with “little” wind) is 21 – 24 C. Another person might “prefer” a temp of 28 C with breezy conditions (like me)…another might seek 10 C with humid conditions…etc. My point was that often these preferences are developed over time as one acclimates to their climate.

As far as Bill Bryson and his "literary dissertation” on gentle heat...again you miss the mark: This is his "opinion". Bill was born in the northern USA (in the Midwest - the coldest region of the USA), and spent most of his professional writing life in cool temperate North Yorkshire, UK. Like New Zealand…England has a cool summer and is overall a cooler climate with few hot days when compared to most climates on earth. Bill’s opinion or preferences for sensible weather likely changed over time as he became acclimated to a high latitude/cool oceanic climate. We will never know what he would have considered “gentle heat” had he spent much of his life in Bangkok or Point Barrow and became acclimated to those climates.

The fact remains that about 75% (+/-) of the humans on this planet have become acclimated to warmer temperatures than folks from cool high latitude oceanic climates like you live in. That is a fact.The rest is merely subjective.
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Old 10-19-2010, 08:58 PM
 
Location: Bangkok, Thailand
2,688 posts, read 4,350,914 times
Reputation: 1553
Quote:
Originally Posted by wavehunter007 View Post
The fact remains that about 75% (+/-) of the humans on this planet have become acclimated to warmer temperatures than folks from cool high latitude oceanic climates like you live in. That is a fact.The rest is merely subjective.
I would've thought NZ would be better characterised as "mid-latitude" than "high latitude".
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