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Old 10-19-2010, 09:16 PM
 
Location: USA East Coast
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChesterNZ View Post
I would've thought NZ would be better characterised as "mid-latitude" than "high latitude".
You’re right: I would consider anything south of 50 N/S as middle latitude instead of high latitude. I tend to forget that the temperate oceanic climate of New Zealand (40 – 47 S) is a bit further south than similar temperate oceanic climates like England (50 – 55 N) or Seattle/Vancouver (50 -52 N).
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Old 10-19-2010, 09:19 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Western Massachusetts
46,078 posts, read 45,898,993 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wavehunter007 View Post
You’re right: I would consider anything south of 50 N/S as middle latitude instead of high latitude. I tend to forget that the temperate oceanic climate of New Zealand (40 – 47 S) is a bit further south than similar temperate oceanic climates like England (50 – 55 N) or Seattle/Vancouver (50 -52 N).
Both Seattle and Vancouver are below 50°N. (Seattle is 47; Vancouver 49)
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Old 10-19-2010, 09:21 PM
 
Location: New York City
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdCanadian View Post
I'm not sure I agree.
I see no benefit in me being angry about the weather for most of the year.


It might be more fun living in the cold,
if everyone liked to make jokes about how rotten it is...
AND then "Room Temp" would be always be comfy for ME! (78-84 F please. )

It would be nicer in winter if everywhere was near 80 F inside.
Instead, it's usually tolerable temps dressed properly though it never feels "good."

Honestly, I don't understand why humans aren't more "reptilian" (temp preferences, moods) like I am.

"Enjoying coolness" makes no sense at all to me,
unless you're sick or you have been doing heavy excersize.
I was just talking about this a couple days ago with somebody who used to live in Harbin - one of the coldest big cities in the world. What they said was that in many ways winters in Harbin were much more bearable and much warmer cities in China, like Shanghai. Most homes in Shanghai are not heated and get very cold (for indoors) whereas Harbin homes are nice and cozy inside.

This makes sense to me. Personally I don't like it when indoor temperatures fall below 74F, regardless of the time of the year. I'm probably most comfortable at around 75F.
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Old 10-19-2010, 09:33 PM
 
Location: USA East Coast
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Both Seattle and Vancouver are below 50°N. (Seattle is 47; Vancouver 49)
Wow, I thought Seattle was close to 49 - 50 N…but I always thought for sure that Vancouver BC was well north of 50 N. Good call. I guess England/Ireland/Scotland are really more the anomaly in latitude for the temperate oceanic climate zone.
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Old 10-19-2010, 09:50 PM
 
Location: In transition
10,595 posts, read 13,595,386 times
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I still think what was said about the average person has a more or less comfortable temperature range 20-25C is true. If folks really truly acclimated to hot temperatures in the subtropical summers, then why in places like South Florida do they have the A/C blasting 365 days a year even when the temp may only be 75-80F during the winter? Same holds true for northern climates and heat. In Canada, we overly insulate our houses because we don't want to feel cold indoors at any time. We haven't acclimated to our cold climate one could say.
Even in my case, while I do enjoy hot weather and even enjoy the sensation of sweating, I also like having a cool drink or water on hand to keep myself hydrated. So, it could be argued that even though I enjoy hot weather, my body is probably not all that acclimated? I'm sure many people probably fit this profile.
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Old 10-19-2010, 09:58 PM
 
Location: In transition
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wavehunter007 View Post
Wow, I thought Seattle was close to 49 - 50 N…but I always thought for sure that Vancouver BC was well north of 50 N. Good call. I guess England/Ireland/Scotland are really more the anomaly in latitude for the temperate oceanic climate zone.
Europe is definitely the anomaly for the temperate oceanic climate zone. The temperate oceanic climate zone goes all the way up to 60N in Europe and the subarctic oceanic climate zone goes to 70N thanks to the power of the Gulf Stream. It's amazing to think that the Lofoten Islands of Norway at 67N have average winter temperatures above freezing.
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Old 10-19-2010, 11:25 PM
 
Location: Bangkok, Thailand
2,688 posts, read 4,364,075 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wavehunter007 View Post
You’re right: I would consider anything south of 50 N/S as middle latitude instead of high latitude. I tend to forget that the temperate oceanic climate of New Zealand (40 – 47 S) is a bit further south than similar temperate oceanic climates like England (50 – 55 N) or Seattle/Vancouver (50 -52 N).
New Zealand is 34 - 47 S. The northernmost part is at a similar latitude to Los Angeles and Myrtle Beach, but is significantly cooler.
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Old 10-19-2010, 11:40 PM
 
Location: Wellington and North of South
5,127 posts, read 7,337,029 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deneb78 View Post
I still think what was said about the average person has a more or less comfortable temperature range 20-25C is true. If folks really truly acclimated to hot temperatures in the subtropical summers, then why in places like South Florida do they have the A/C blasting 365 days a year even when the temp may only be 75-80F during the winter? Same holds true for northern climates and heat. In Canada, we overly insulate our houses because we don't want to feel cold indoors at any time. We haven't acclimated to our cold climate one could say.
Even in my case, while I do enjoy hot weather and even enjoy the sensation of sweating, I also like having a cool drink or water on hand to keep myself hydrated. So, it could be argued that even though I enjoy hot weather, my body is probably not all that acclimated? I'm sure many people probably fit this profile.
Just so - I can tolerate a lot of "hot" weather - not keen on "cold" conditions, but my neutral "minimum intervention" preference is for the range I quoted. So naturally some of my pleasantest weather recollections are intimately connected to it. As far as I'm concerned the respondents' comments are irrelevant. Besides, my enjoyment or otherwise of the weather goes beyond the temperatures - bright sunshine is a very important factor, thought not at a tropical strength that requires protective care. On the days I was describing, it was possible to bliss out in the sun without considering any consequences. It still say nei's and wavehunter's comments were irrelevant to my little scenario - I wasn't talking about acclimatisation. The former person mistakenly thought I was describing some apex of summer conditions and was grateful for it. The latter has been talking about something quite different.

Makes me wonder why I bothered - next time I won't!
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Old 10-20-2010, 09:03 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Western Massachusetts
46,078 posts, read 45,898,993 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RWood View Post
Just so - I can tolerate a lot of "hot" weather - not keen on "cold" conditions, but my neutral "minimum intervention" preference is for the range I quoted. So naturally some of my pleasantest weather recollections are intimately connected to it. As far as I'm concerned the respondents' comments are irrelevant. Besides, my enjoyment or otherwise of the weather goes beyond the temperatures - bright sunshine is a very important factor, thought not at a tropical strength that requires protective care. On the days I was describing, it was possible to bliss out in the sun without considering any consequences. It still say nei's and wavehunter's comments were irrelevant to my little scenario - I wasn't talking about acclimatisation. The former person mistakenly thought I was describing some apex of summer conditions and was grateful for it. The latter has been talking about something quite different.

Makes me wonder why I bothered - next time I won't!
Ok. No I did not think you were talking about apex of summer conditions, you said clearly it was in early autumn. And yes, I understood you were mentioning that time to give an example of your ideal. However, you mentioning the clarity of the sky several times as if it was very special; where as I would think of "blue dome" conditions as typical good weather day. So I thought it meant that you lived in a somewhat cloudy place.
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Old 10-20-2010, 11:04 AM
 
Location: USA East Coast
4,445 posts, read 9,238,441 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deneb78 View Post
I still think what was said about the average person has a more or less comfortable temperature range 20-25C is true. If folks really truly acclimated to hot temperatures in the subtropical summers, then why in places like South Florida do they have the A/C blasting 365 days a year even when the temp may only be 75-80F during the winter? Same holds true for northern climates and heat. In Canada, we overly insulate our houses because we don't want to feel cold indoors at any time. We haven't acclimated to our cold climate one could say.
Even in my case, while I do enjoy hot weather and even enjoy the sensation of sweating, I also like having a cool drink or water on hand to keep myself hydrated. So, it could be argued that even though I enjoy hot weather, my body is probably not all that acclimated? I'm sure many people probably fit this profile.
That’s a good point.

However, just to be fair, we have several family members who live in tropical south Florida, who do not use the AC at all much of the year. Even as much as I like a sunny 80 – 90 F day, I like it around 65 – 68 F and semi dry (lower humidity) for sleeping. Yet, family/friends who live in south Florida all year think nothing of sleeping in a breezy 78 F room with a dew point of 68 F. In fact if there is a breeze, they will sleep without AC even in the summer at times. We laugh, they will turn off the AC when it’s under 80 F outside then remark " that there is cool breeze" lol. They say folks in Palm Springs and Yuma will only do outside work in summer in the "cool of the day"; this means 8 - 10:00 am or 4:00 to 6:00 PM. Normally in those locations in summer temps are still near 80 F at those hours of the day. However, 80 might see cool when the daily high is 110 F.

Again, acclimation might be playing a hand.
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