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Old 03-12-2011, 11:50 PM
 
Location: Northeast Tennessee
7,305 posts, read 24,583,730 times
Reputation: 5496

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March 13, 1993 - the Superstorm that hit the eastern USA... everyone was impacted. Do you remember it?

I do, I was in high school at the time... we picked up about 15 inches of snow here in northeast Tennessee and I remember it being so cold and windy!! It was like a blizzard. I remember it melted very quickly though. Hard to believe its been 18 years since this event... where does the time go?
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Old 03-13-2011, 01:15 PM
 
Location: ATL with a side of Chicago
3,622 posts, read 5,285,622 times
Reputation: 3925
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tennesseestorm View Post
March 13, 1993 - the Superstorm that hit the eastern USA... everyone was impacted. Do you remember it?

I do, I was in high school at the time... we picked up about 15 inches of snow here in northeast Tennessee and I remember it being so cold and windy!! It was like a blizzard. I remember it melted very quickly though. Hard to believe its been 18 years since this event... where does the time go?
I remember it very well! It was about 2 weeks before my wedding, and one of my bridal showers was supposed to be the day the storm hit. It was out of state, and roads were impassible. We got a lot of snow here in metro ATL!
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Old 03-15-2011, 02:11 AM
 
Location: Carrboro and Concord, NC
964 posts, read 2,147,921 times
Reputation: 1237
I lived in Boone, NC at the time.

The week before the storm I had been in Charlotte - 70-degree weather, and the weather forecasts were apocalyptic, and no one believed it. The day the storm was coming in I was due back in Boone for work, and my car started having issues, so I had to stop at a garage on the way out of Charlotte. The temperature fell rapidly through the morning, and I was only about 10 miles away from Charlotte when the rain started changing to snow. The roads were fine all they way back up to Boone, and I got to work fine.

I had to cash a check, and I knew the manager of the supermarket in the mall, so I ducked out of work shortly after dark, and it had begun to snow very heavily. They were forecasting 2-3 feet of snow in Boone, and I completely didn't believe it. I had - however - skipped dinner, and was walking through the store a day after pay day with a checkbook and proceeded to blow the best-spent $200 I think I've ever spent. Around 9 it stopped snowing - we'd gotten around 6 inches, so I went out after work with some friends.

By the time I got home it had started again, very, very heavy snow, no wind however. I set my alarm for work the next morning, still not believing the forecast, made a snack, and stayed up until around 2:30. It was snowing about 2 inches an hour, and we were fast approaching 10 inches.

I wake up at 8:30, and go to my window to see what it had done while I was asleep. I pulled the cord on the blinds until they were at the top, and the window was solid white, and I remember thinking "**** - this is beyond belief." So I threw on some clothes and ran down the hall in my apartment - at the end of the hall there was a window that overlooked the parking lot.

It looked like dunes at the beach - unspoiled, grainy, smooth, with humps, out of which you'd see about 6 inches of a car antenna. The wind had picked up to hurricane force, and there was a 25-foot drift against an embankment to the right of the building. Because of the wind, you could see debris flying around outside. Zero traffic, except for humvees that the police department had. Boone gets a lot of snow (though nothing like this), so they have plows and sidewalk plows, but - as the winds howled until Sunday night (when the temperature dropped below zero), and it was pretty much a white-out for 36 hours, they didn't try to clear anything until Monday morning.

There was a convenience store next door to me, and I walked out to there - as it turns out, the only business open in the entire county - the girl working the overnight shift had gotten snowed in. The place was picked clean - beer, soft drinks, junk food, cigarettes, even most of the tabloid newspapers were sold out. The walk - all of 60 feet - took maybe 10 minutes, as the snow was about 3 feet and drifting, which is basically like slogging through a swamp.

It was 3 more days before I could leave my apartment. Boone - in a moment of foresight decades ago, buried lots of power lines, and the town electrical supply is purchased from the university's power plant in town, so the power never goes out in town. Outside of town it was a different story.

The highest wind gust at Grandfather Mountain was something in the neighborhood of ~110 miles per hour. 45 miles to the southwest, Mitchell and Yancey Counties got more than 50 inches of snow, the deepest snowfall accumulation ever in North Carolina.
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Old 03-15-2011, 05:08 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,682 posts, read 48,292,826 times
Reputation: 11862
That sounds spectacular davidals, thanks for sharing.
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Old 03-16-2011, 12:05 AM
 
Location: Northeast Tennessee
7,305 posts, read 24,583,730 times
Reputation: 5496
Oh yeah, Boone was hit hard... I know if we were hit hard in Bristol (52 miles NW of Boone at about 2000 ft lower in elevation) that it was bad up there, lol. Its like another world up there. lol.

Quote:
Originally Posted by davidals View Post
I lived in Boone, NC at the time.

The week before the storm I had been in Charlotte - 70-degree weather, and the weather forecasts were apocalyptic, and no one believed it. The day the storm was coming in I was due back in Boone for work, and my car started having issues, so I had to stop at a garage on the way out of Charlotte. The temperature fell rapidly through the morning, and I was only about 10 miles away from Charlotte when the rain started changing to snow. The roads were fine all they way back up to Boone, and I got to work fine.

I had to cash a check, and I knew the manager of the supermarket in the mall, so I ducked out of work shortly after dark, and it had begun to snow very heavily. They were forecasting 2-3 feet of snow in Boone, and I completely didn't believe it. I had - however - skipped dinner, and was walking through the store a day after pay day with a checkbook and proceeded to blow the best-spent $200 I think I've ever spent. Around 9 it stopped snowing - we'd gotten around 6 inches, so I went out after work with some friends.

By the time I got home it had started again, very, very heavy snow, no wind however. I set my alarm for work the next morning, still not believing the forecast, made a snack, and stayed up until around 2:30. It was snowing about 2 inches an hour, and we were fast approaching 10 inches.

I wake up at 8:30, and go to my window to see what it had done while I was asleep. I pulled the cord on the blinds until they were at the top, and the window was solid white, and I remember thinking "**** - this is beyond belief." So I threw on some clothes and ran down the hall in my apartment - at the end of the hall there was a window that overlooked the parking lot.

It looked like dunes at the beach - unspoiled, grainy, smooth, with humps, out of which you'd see about 6 inches of a car antenna. The wind had picked up to hurricane force, and there was a 25-foot drift against an embankment to the right of the building. Because of the wind, you could see debris flying around outside. Zero traffic, except for humvees that the police department had. Boone gets a lot of snow (though nothing like this), so they have plows and sidewalk plows, but - as the winds howled until Sunday night (when the temperature dropped below zero), and it was pretty much a white-out for 36 hours, they didn't try to clear anything until Monday morning.

There was a convenience store next door to me, and I walked out to there - as it turns out, the only business open in the entire county - the girl working the overnight shift had gotten snowed in. The place was picked clean - beer, soft drinks, junk food, cigarettes, even most of the tabloid newspapers were sold out. The walk - all of 60 feet - took maybe 10 minutes, as the snow was about 3 feet and drifting, which is basically like slogging through a swamp.

It was 3 more days before I could leave my apartment. Boone - in a moment of foresight decades ago, buried lots of power lines, and the town electrical supply is purchased from the university's power plant in town, so the power never goes out in town. Outside of town it was a different story.

The highest wind gust at Grandfather Mountain was something in the neighborhood of ~110 miles per hour. 45 miles to the southwest, Mitchell and Yancey Counties got more than 50 inches of snow, the deepest snowfall accumulation ever in North Carolina.
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Old 03-17-2011, 04:55 AM
 
Location: St. Louis
529 posts, read 848,323 times
Reputation: 234
I remember it and we didn't have hardly any snow in STL. The reason I remember is that I was in college at the time and a lot of people got stuck trying to drive back from spring break in Florida. I remember seeing the news reports of the highways that were completely jammed with stuck cars and people camping out wherever they could.
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