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View Poll Results: What would Miami be classified as
Subtropical 5 29.41%
Tropical 12 70.59%
Other 0 0%
Voters: 17. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 04-14-2024, 08:44 AM
 
2,815 posts, read 1,405,653 times
Reputation: 356

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lancerman View Post
That is open for interperetation.
Not exactly. As was outlined in the following comment from that same linked thread - which you have seen before - the semi-arid threshold formula for whether evapotranspiration exceeds precipitation leaves a clear-cut interpretation that Honolulu is too dry to be tropical because its evapotranspiration does so.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Can't think of username View Post
Yes, the National Weather Service: https://www.weather.gov/wrh/Climate?wfo=hfo
They give a yearly average temperature of 25.6 Celsius and a yearly average precipitation total of 417mm to Honolulu in the 1991-2020 climate normals, 110mm of which falls in the high-sun April-September part of the year. Take note of this information for below.

Now to run this by the criteria for a hot semi-arid climate.
That would be to multiply by 20 the average annual temperature in degrees Celsius and then add 280 if at least 70% of the total precipitation falls in the summer half of the year (April–September in the northern hemisphere, October–March in the southern hemisphere), add 140 if 30–70% of the total precipitation falls in the summer half of the year, or add nothing if less than 30% of the total precipitation falls in the summer half of the year.

25.6 Celsius x 20 = 512.
110mm is less than 30% of 417mm, so we add nothing to our original 512 figure.

If the area's annual precipitation in millimeters is less than the threshold but more than half or 50% the threshold, it is classified as a BS (steppe or semi-arid climate). And because 417 is less than 512 but more than half of 512, Honolulu is hot semi-arid instead of tropical.
I have nothing more to say to you if you don't understand this.
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Old 04-14-2024, 08:52 AM
 
Location: Etobicoke
1,538 posts, read 866,766 times
Reputation: 978
Quote:
Originally Posted by Can't think of username View Post
Not exactly. As was outlined in the following comment from that same linked thread - which you have seen before - the semi-arid threshold formula for whether evapotranspiration exceeds precipitation leaves a clear-cut interpretation that Honolulu is too dry to be tropical because its evapotranspiration does so.

I have nothing more to say to you if you don't understand this.
Honolulu can't be tropical savanna?
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Old 04-14-2024, 10:10 AM
 
2,815 posts, read 1,405,653 times
Reputation: 356
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lancerman View Post
Honolulu can't be tropical savanna?
Absolutely not, for the reason in the above comment. That explanation should have been crystal clear - continuous evapotranspiration is too great.
Furthermore, if Honolulu is tropical savanna, this greatly disvalues the hot semi-arid climate classification by failing to consider the impact of a large enough rain shadow. Clearly this makes no sense.

I'm done.

Post-below comment edit: I can't stop others from interpreting the climate classifications the way they want to, but with any luck, most members will realize why it makes no sense to not recognize a hot semi-arid classification.

Last edited by Can't think of username; 04-14-2024 at 10:25 AM..
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Old 04-14-2024, 10:13 AM
 
Location: Etobicoke
1,538 posts, read 866,766 times
Reputation: 978
I'm not calling Honolulu 'Hot semi-arid'. I don't recognize that classification- End of story.

Last edited by Lancerman; 04-14-2024 at 10:22 AM..
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Old 04-14-2024, 11:54 AM
 
Location: Victoria, BC, Canada
5,720 posts, read 3,504,425 times
Reputation: 2630
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lancerman View Post
I'm not calling Honolulu 'Hot semi-arid'. I don't recognize that classification- End of story.
Yes. Honolulu is 100% tropical through-and-through. It's only because of very localized orographic effects that its rainfall totals are so low.


Source: https://maps.app.goo.gl/B54K4y1iGCxtsgD79
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