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View Poll Results: What would Miami be classified as
Subtropical 5 29.41%
Tropical 12 70.59%
Other 0 0%
Voters: 17. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 03-17-2014, 07:19 PM
 
Location: NSW
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theunbrainwashed View Post
So is tropical the only climate where it has to be firmly within the tropical limits? Sounds like more stereotypes to me. Is Tampico, Mexico subtropical then because it has snowed there before?
This is the key points, just because Miami can get a cold snap or two that actually penetrates means little, as they are short lived and most of the year is balmy and tropical.
For all intents and purposes this area has no winter.
Miami's climate and yearly means are similar to about Townsville here, and that's easily tropical.
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Old 03-17-2014, 07:21 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theunbrainwashed View Post
So is tropical the only climate where it has to be firmly within the tropical limits? Sounds like more stereotypes to me. Is Tampico, Mexico subtropical then because it has snowed there before?
it has also snowed in Miami before. are you saying tampico or veracruz? not all climates in tropics are tropical, pico orizaba/Mts, Mexico highlands, Baja CA tip, etc. although some areas outside the tropics have tropical climates (Nassau)
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Old 03-17-2014, 07:23 PM
 
25,058 posts, read 24,554,205 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Derek41 View Post
This is the key points, just because Miami can get a cold snap or two that actually penetrates means little, as they are short lived and most of the year is balmy and tropical.
For all intents and purposes this area has no winter.
Miami's climate and yearly means are similar to about Townsville here, and that's easily tropical.
What I don't understand is that most posters here have the strictest standards for tropical climates that they don't have for others. In other words, tropical climates can't have a single trace of snow, has to be sunny all the time, can't get below 70°F ever, etc.
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Old 03-18-2014, 12:45 AM
 
Location: Miami,FL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theunbrainwashed View Post
What I don't understand is that most posters here have the strictest standards for tropical climates that they don't have for others. In other words, tropical climates can't have a single trace of snow, has to be sunny all the time, can't get below 70°F ever, etc.
my definition of tropical is avg coldest month 22c+ so no part of Florida is tropical not even Key West. The occasional cold snaps is only part of the problem. 22c is the threshold 4 most tropical plants to grow while obviously they can survive below this tropical flora like Coconuts won't grow properly unless the average temp is that warm and a tropical climate shouldn't have a time of hibernation for it's flora. the parts of Florida that koppen considers tropical are semi-tropical. semi-tropical is a transition zone where both temperate and tropical plants can establish themselves and that is clearly the case even in key west. oaks and pines can still grow in the key showing it's not tropical.
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Old 03-18-2014, 12:53 AM
 
Location: Miami,FL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theunbrainwashed View Post
What I don't understand is that most posters here have the strictest standards for tropical climates that they don't have for others. In other words, tropical climates can't have a single trace of snow, has to be sunny all the time, can't get below 70°F ever, etc.
also not all of the Bahamas are tropical. Freeport is too cool during the winter 2 b tropical however the rest of the bahamas are tropical except 4 the other northwestern islands.
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Old 03-18-2014, 10:30 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by miamihurricane555 View Post
also not all of the Bahamas are tropical. Freeport is too cool during the winter 2 b tropical however the rest of the bahamas are tropical except 4 the other northwestern islands.
Quote:
Originally Posted by miamihurricane555 View Post
my definition of tropical is avg coldest month 22c+ so no part of Florida is tropical not even Key West. The occasional cold snaps is only part of the problem. 22c is the threshold 4 most tropical plants to grow while obviously they can survive below this tropical flora like Coconuts won't grow properly unless the average temp is that warm and a tropical climate shouldn't have a time of hibernation for it's flora. the parts of Florida that koppen considers tropical are semi-tropical. semi-tropical is a transition zone where both temperate and tropical plants can establish themselves and that is clearly the case even in key west. oaks and pines can still grow in the key showing it's not tropical.
Case in point the poster above. Has very strict standards for tropical climates but not for others. Miami is has a tropical. It grows royal poincianas and coconut palms. You find those up to the northern limits of tropical climates.

Miamihurricane, I'm gonna take a guess, and I could be wrong, but have you ever been to a deep tropical location? I was born and raised in Puerto Rico, and our flora goes dormant too. They don't shed their leaves, but they stop fruiting after fall. They start pollinating the hell out of the air in the springtime and grow flowers and shed them in summer, just like temperate flora.

Where I'm from grows a lot of typical looking trees. Not every tree is a palm tree back home. In fact, those are uncommon next to trees like the Ceiba tree. The Ceiba tree looks like any "normal" tree does.
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Old 03-18-2014, 10:59 AM
 
Location: Winterpeg & up
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theunbrainwashed View Post
Case in point the poster above. Has very strict standards for tropical climates but not for others. Miami is has a tropical. It grows royal poincianas and coconut palms. You find those up to the northern limits of tropical climates.

Miamihurricane, I'm gonna take a guess, and I could be wrong, but have you ever been to a deep tropical location? I was born and raised in Puerto Rico, and our flora goes dormant too. They don't shed their leaves, but they stop fruiting after fall. They start pollinating the hell out of the air in the springtime and grow flowers and shed them in summer, just like temperate flora.

Where I'm from grows a lot of typical looking trees. Not every tree is a palm tree back home. In fact, those are uncommon next to trees like the Ceiba tree. The Ceiba tree looks like any "normal" tree does.
I have been to a few countries south of Puerto Rico and even though they may have normal looking trees, they still have more of a tropical feel than Miami.

On the normal trees subject, here is one:

https://maps.google.ca/maps?q=panama...7.46,,0,-17.18
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Old 03-18-2014, 12:29 PM
 
Location: Miami,FL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theunbrainwashed View Post
Case in point the poster above. Has very strict standards for tropical climates but not for others. Miami is has a tropical. It grows royal poincianas and coconut palms. You find those up to the northern limits of tropical climates.

Miamihurricane, I'm gonna take a guess, and I could be wrong, but have you ever been to a deep tropical location? I was born and raised in Puerto Rico, and our flora goes dormant too. They don't shed their leaves, but they stop fruiting after fall. They start pollinating the hell out of the air in the springtime and grow flowers and shed them in summer, just like temperate flora.

Where I'm from grows a lot of typical looking trees. Not every tree is a palm tree back home. In fact, those are uncommon next to trees like the Ceiba tree. The Ceiba tree looks like any "normal" tree does.
Yes I have been to the deep tropics. my family is from colombia and I visit them occasionaly in the summer travel over a large chunk of colombia. drove from bogota-bucarramanga also visited the area around medellin as well as cali. There is a hudge differance between colombia's flora at below 1,000 meters and miami's...
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Old 03-18-2014, 04:27 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles
2,412 posts, read 2,027,087 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theunbrainwashed View Post
Case in point the poster above. Has very strict standards for tropical climates but not for others. Miami is has a tropical. It grows royal poincianas and coconut palms. You find those up to the northern limits of tropical climates.
There are royal poincianas in Southern California, as well as coconuts (maybe 10 in all SoCal, newport palm is healthy), but that doesnt make us a tropical climate.
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Old 03-18-2014, 04:30 PM
 
Location: Katy, Texas
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22C+ requirement excludes coastal Vietnam north of 15N, coastal north Queensland at 16N, Veracruz, and the windward coasts of Hawaii.
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