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Old 04-15-2011, 07:26 PM
 
Location: In transition
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Hey all,
Which climate would you rate better in the winter, Hobart, Tasmania or Shanghai, China?

Hobart - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Shanghai - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

I'd choose Hobart for its milder winters.

Edit: I forgot to put in a poll but you can just write what you think.
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Old 04-15-2011, 08:17 PM
 
Location: Columbus, Ohio
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These winters are virtually the same for a snow-lover like me: gray and cool, but not cold. This is meh territory, but at least it's cool enough for me not to worry about sweating. Shanghai gets flurries or something winter-like a few times every winter though, so I'll choose that city.
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Old 04-15-2011, 09:07 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
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Despite winter being the dry season in pretty much all (bar extreme western parts) of China, the east coast of China all the way to the border of Vietnam actually gets a lot of moist, cloudy systems from the South and East China sea, and even westerly systems. Shanghai gets just 4 hours of bright sun in January on average, which is actually about the SAME as Hobart, at 43'S. In fact, it's winters are about as gloomy as Melbourne, despite it being their 'dry' season precipitation wise. They get many cloudy days with no rain or drizzle.

Hobart in winter is a bit drier and colder than Melbourne, and I imagine a bit stormier than Shanghai. Temperature-wise it's certainly milder, though, so I'll go with Hobart.
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Old 04-15-2011, 09:08 PM
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Location: Western Massachusetts
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Hobart seems nicer. Don't see any advantage to Shanghai.
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Old 04-15-2011, 09:11 PM
 
Location: Wellington and North of South
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Hobart, asuuming it's not cloudier.
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Old 04-15-2011, 09:16 PM
 
Location: In transition
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There are 12 degrees of latitude difference between Shanghai and Hobart and Hobart is still warmer in winter.... In fact Shanghai's winters seem almost on par with London which is 20 degrees latitude difference!
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Old 04-15-2011, 09:18 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deneb78 View Post
There are 12 degrees of latitude difference between Shanghai and Hobart and Hobart is still warmer in winter.... In fact Shanghai's winters seem almost on par with London which is 20 degrees latitude difference!
Shanghai has the Asian landmass including Siberia above it, while Hobart has a couple of thousand kilometres of ocean between it and the Antarctic.
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Old 04-15-2011, 09:28 PM
 
Location: In transition
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
Shanghai has the Asian landmass including Siberia above it, while Hobart has a couple of thousand kilometres of ocean between it and the Antarctic.
True enough... continental climates at even much lower latitudes will almost always be colder in winter than maritime climates.
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Old 04-15-2011, 09:29 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deneb78 View Post
True enough... continental climates at even much lower latitudes will almost always be colder in winter than maritime climates.
Yep, and Asia is the most continental of them all, being the biggest landmass.
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Old 04-15-2011, 09:35 PM
 
Location: Toronto
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Hobart seems nicer. Don't see any advantage to Shanghai.
Yeah, that's my choice and reasoning too. Warmer winter wins. Although Shanghai has less days over which rain falls, for what that's worth.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
Despite winter being the dry season in pretty much all (bar extreme western parts) of China, the east coast of China all the way to the border of Vietnam actually gets a lot of moist, cloudy systems from the South and East China sea, and even westerly systems. Shanghai gets just 4 hours of bright sun in January on average, which is actually about the SAME as Hobart, at 43'S. In fact, it's winters are about as gloomy as Melbourne, despite it being their 'dry' season precipitation wise. They get many cloudy days with no rain or drizzle.

Hobart in winter is a bit drier and colder than Melbourne, and I imagine a bit stormier than Shanghai. Temperature-wise it's certainly milder, though, so I'll go with Hobart.
I suppose "dry season" is a bit of a misnomer then -- it would be dry in the sense that say London is "dry" relative to NYC -- little, sparse drizzly precipitation still present over many days.

When I imagine a climate with a dry season in that sense, I tend to visualize a place like Darwin, Bangkok or Bombay where the dry winter time is sunny, not drizzly or cloudy (leading to often even more sun in winter). Though that might be a tropical climate thing, and Shanghai is not really like those.
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