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Old 12-29-2011, 05:42 PM
 
Location: London, UK
2,702 posts, read 6,070,514 times
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Please forgive me if someone said this already; I haven't read thoroughly all the answers. I think there are two different topics here :

1. Personal weather preferences

2. Influence of weather and climate on an environment.


What the OP wanted to show, and I agree with that, is about 2., i.e. warm climates are more prone to life, not only human life, but all kinds of life, that's why there is incomparably more 'life' in general in the Amazonian forest - think animal, bugs, etc. than in the taiga, let alone polar areas. Also, as said by the OP, warm areas are in general more populated than very cold areas (Africa vs Siberia or northern Canada), though not more than temperate areas (China, USA, Europe) which seemed like the best environment for human societies to develop, and develop successfully.

As for 1., i.e. weather preferences, I believe there is nothing to prove, no superiority of any kind of weather over another. People simply have different preferences and there is nothing you can do against that. Some people enjoy the cold of Alaska, others will prefer a classic 4-seasons climate like NYC's, many will enjoy a mild Mediterranean warmth and some freaks like myself feel perfectly well in muggy Singapore.
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Old 12-29-2011, 08:09 PM
 
Location: USA East Coast
4,445 posts, read 9,884,464 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dhdh View Post
Please forgive me if someone said this already; I haven't read thoroughly all the answers. I think there are two different topics here :

1. Personal weather preferences

2. Influence of weather and climate on an environment.


What the OP wanted to show, and I agree with that, is about 2., i.e. warm climates are more prone to life, not only human life, but all kinds of life, that's why there is incomparably more 'life' in general in the Amazonian forest - think animal, bugs, etc. than in the taiga, let alone polar areas. Also, as said by the OP, warm areas are in general more populated than very cold areas (Africa vs Siberia or northern Canada), though not more than temperate areas (China, USA, Europe) which seemed like the best environment for human societies to develop, and develop successfully.

As for 1., i.e. weather preferences, I believe there is nothing to prove, no superiority of any kind of weather over another. People simply have different preferences and there is nothing you can do against that. Some people enjoy the cold of Alaska, others will prefer a classic 4-seasons climate like NYC's, many will enjoy a mild Mediterranean warmth and some freaks like myself feel perfectly well in muggy Singapore.

I agree 100%

This back and forth of warm climates vs cold climates proves little. We each have preferences to what climates we seek.

One other point I think...is that we are spoiled here in the states. With so many different climates, we often fail to see why/how others can like where they live: People in Yuma will say to people in Fargo they don't know how they can live like that (or the reverse). Of course each of us views it through a different lens.
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Old 10-10-2014, 12:38 AM
 
3,751 posts, read 4,619,948 times
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I prefer "cold" climates only because people consider climates that have seasons to be "cold" merely for the fact they have a winter.

With that said, I'd take a moderately year round cold climate like Iceland over somewhere like Singapore for sure.
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Old 01-14-2023, 02:38 PM
 
2,113 posts, read 1,376,969 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thepastpresentandfuture View Post
Well then if 98 degrees is someone's body temperature, then technically the ideal temperatures seems to be in the 65 degrees to 98 degrees range and it shows that humans are warm blooded and need warm temperatures to support themselves much more than cold temperatures.

If it is below 50 degrees, someone can get a fever, flu,and cold if they don't have layers of clothing on. If it is below 40 degrees and someone doesn't cover themselves up with layers they can die of hyperthermia, or frostbite.

Also, agriculture(where all the food is originally grown) needs mild and warm temperatures. Cold freezing temperatures kills agriculture and doesnt allow agriculture to exist. Also mild and warm temperatures are needed for plants of all types to exist such as trees.

And look at this way, if you had to pick mild/warm/hot year round vs cold year round what is superior? If it is 65 degrees to 98 degrees year round or if it is 40 degrees or colder year round?

Last time I checked billions of people live in tropical regions of the world while the north and south poles and arctic places like that nobody really lives there and they are uninhabitable.

So I just proved to you how warm, hot, and mild temperatures are superior to cold and freezing temperatures for humans and for this planet.

Obviously, it is also ok if a place gets freezing cold temperatures for 6 months or less of the year as long as they have at least 2 months where it gets mild, warm, or hot. And plus, I like snow on top of mountainous terrain and snow can look great.

I am just saying how mild, warm, and hot temperatures are needed for human life to exist and for the world to exist.
Cold and freezing weather isn't nearly as needed and not even needed at all.

So I just objectively proved how warm, hot, and mild temperatures are superior to cold and freezing temperatures for humans and for this planet.
While I wouldn't say this is proof I just stumbled on this post and I made some of the same arguments before. Particularly about most people on Earth living in tropical, subtropical, or warm arid climates and very few living in Tundra or subarctic climates.

I would also add that room temperature is typically 18-24c . any place that is 10c or colder indoors is unreasonably cold to 99.9% of people, and yet many of those people prefer outdoor temperatures of 10c over 24, which has never made sense to me.

One thing I will add against this though is that outside of the room temperature range, hotter temperatures become unpleasant to most people faster than cold temperatures. They become dangerous faster too because there are less ways to address them. Colder temps down to -11 (21-30) can be addressed fairly easily by staying dry and dressed appropriately Warmer temps up to 51 (21+30) become extremely dangerous in the upper part of that range
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Old 01-14-2023, 11:14 PM
Status: "Christians are not oppressed in the US." (set 6 days ago)
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
7,094 posts, read 5,383,598 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Space_League View Post
While I wouldn't say this is proof I just stumbled on this post and I made some of the same arguments before. Particularly about most people on Earth living in tropical, subtropical, or warm arid climates and very few living in Tundra or subarctic climates.

I would also add that room temperature is typically 18-24c . any place that is 10c or colder indoors is unreasonably cold to 99.9% of people, and yet many of those people prefer outdoor temperatures of 10c over 24, which has never made sense to me.

One thing I will add against this though is that outside of the room temperature range, hotter temperatures become unpleasant to most people faster than cold temperatures. They become dangerous faster too because there are less ways to address them. Colder temps down to -11 (21-30) can be addressed fairly easily by staying dry and dressed appropriately Warmer temps up to 51 (21+30) become extremely dangerous in the upper part of that range
I prefer indoor temps between 65-75. For sleeping I prefer 60s. But outside? I like variety, depending on the season. I don't like endless heat but I enjoy 80s-90s in the summer, as long as nights get to the 70s-60s. Nights that stay in the 80s and upper 70s are gross.

I can tolerate temps below 0 in winter, but prefer temps in the teens and twenties. I think the 20s are the perfect temperatures in the winter. Its very easy to stay warm if you dress right.

Unfortunately we can't be naked all the time so summers can be uncomfortable!
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Old 01-15-2023, 01:14 AM
 
Location: Oakville, ON
3,895 posts, read 4,741,605 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pincho-toot View Post
I prefer indoor temps between 65-75. For sleeping I prefer 60s. But outside? I like variety, depending on the season. I don't like endless heat but I enjoy 80s-90s in the summer, as long as nights get to the 70s-60s. Nights that stay in the 80s and upper 70s are gross.

I can tolerate temps below 0 in winter, but prefer temps in the teens and twenties. I think the 20s are the perfect temperatures in the winter. Its very easy to stay warm if you dress right.

Unfortunately we can't be naked all the time so summers can be uncomfortable!
I disagree with the OP that 98F is "good". Your body generates heat, and it needs to lose at least a bit of heat to the environment to avoid overheating. If the environment is warmer than the desired body temperature, or even equal to the desired body temperature, that doesn't work too well. Fortunately, if water evaporates that uses up a lot of heat, which is how you can get rid of excess body heat even if it's >98F outside, however, that works decreasingly poorly if it's humid outside and the air is more saturated with water, hence 95F at 100% humidity being very dangerous.

98F at low humidity (ex 30%) can still be ok, but at high humidity (ex 60%) it's very uncomfortable.

When in the shade, with no wind, and little to no clothes, and relatively little activity (ex at a computer or sleeping), I would say that 22-25C is optimal. 25-30C is still fine especially outside (but in the shade) since there tends to be at least a bit of a breeze. Cooler than 22C is still fine under many conditions, including with some insulation (ex sleeping under a blanket, or wearing clothes) or if you're a bit active, or if you're in the sun.

Taking into account these ranges of conditions, I would say that 17-25C is optimal, that's when you "don't feel the temperature" - a lack of discomfort tends to go un-noticed.

But sometimes, you "just want to feel things". Feeling a little hot can be relaxing, at temperatures of 25-30C, maybe even 30-35C, as long as you're not expected to do much more than relax on a beach chair. This is actually likely close to the temperature under a blanket when most people sleep (even if it can be much cooler outside the blanket ex 15-18C). And cooler temperatures can feel refreshing and invigorating. The ideal temperature for doing high energy sports like soccer is probably around 10-12C.

During continental climate summers, you can experience a good range of these conditions. Relaxing heat in mid-day with 30C temperatures, and refreshing cool temperatures around 15C at night or at dawn. But there is also something to be said about tropical nights - they can be a bit unpleasant if you have no A/C and are trying to get the house to cool down so you can sleep, but walking around at night when it's 23-26C with high humidity but no sun to worry about is something I enjoy quite a bit.

As for the winters, I do think snow looks very pretty, and it's gotta be below 0C for that to stay. But if snow had a melting temperature of 12C, I would want the winters to be 10-12C instead... Temperatures of -10C to 0C are still not too bad though, and I'd certainly prefer -2C with snow to 3C with rain (and we get that cold rain quite a lot in our winters...)

Regarding plants, 37C (99F) is generally not great. The optimal temperature for growth of cool climate adapted plants like wheat, many grasses, cabbages, peas, lettuce... they can grow under 5-15C, but they'll grow faster at 15-20C. For semi-tropical plants like tomatoes and peppers, as well as corn, beans, and many more, it's around 18-30C. And then for tropical plants 25-35C is probably the best. But 37C all day and all night, most greenhouses would ventilate to try to avoid that.
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Old 01-15-2023, 02:25 PM
Status: "Christians are not oppressed in the US." (set 6 days ago)
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
7,094 posts, read 5,383,598 times
Reputation: 9386
Quote:
Originally Posted by memph View Post
I disagree with the OP that 98F is "good". Your body generates heat, and it needs to lose at least a bit of heat to the environment to avoid overheating. If the environment is warmer than the desired body temperature, or even equal to the desired body temperature, that doesn't work too well. Fortunately, if water evaporates that uses up a lot of heat, which is how you can get rid of excess body heat even if it's >98F outside, however, that works decreasingly poorly if it's humid outside and the air is more saturated with water, hence 95F at 100% humidity being very dangerous.

98F at low humidity (ex 30%) can still be ok, but at high humidity (ex 60%) it's very uncomfortable.

When in the shade, with no wind, and little to no clothes, and relatively little activity (ex at a computer or sleeping), I would say that 22-25C is optimal. 25-30C is still fine especially outside (but in the shade) since there tends to be at least a bit of a breeze. Cooler than 22C is still fine under many conditions, including with some insulation (ex sleeping under a blanket, or wearing clothes) or if you're a bit active, or if you're in the sun.

Taking into account these ranges of conditions, I would say that 17-25C is optimal, that's when you "don't feel the temperature" - a lack of discomfort tends to go un-noticed.

But sometimes, you "just want to feel things". Feeling a little hot can be relaxing, at temperatures of 25-30C, maybe even 30-35C, as long as you're not expected to do much more than relax on a beach chair. This is actually likely close to the temperature under a blanket when most people sleep (even if it can be much cooler outside the blanket ex 15-18C). And cooler temperatures can feel refreshing and invigorating. The ideal temperature for doing high energy sports like soccer is probably around 10-12C.

During continental climate summers, you can experience a good range of these conditions. Relaxing heat in mid-day with 30C temperatures, and refreshing cool temperatures around 15C at night or at dawn. But there is also something to be said about tropical nights - they can be a bit unpleasant if you have no A/C and are trying to get the house to cool down so you can sleep, but walking around at night when it's 23-26C with high humidity but no sun to worry about is something I enjoy quite a bit.

As for the winters, I do think snow looks very pretty, and it's gotta be below 0C for that to stay. But if snow had a melting temperature of 12C, I would want the winters to be 10-12C instead... Temperatures of -10C to 0C are still not too bad though, and I'd certainly prefer -2C with snow to 3C with rain (and we get that cold rain quite a lot in our winters...)

Regarding plants, 37C (99F) is generally not great. The optimal temperature for growth of cool climate adapted plants like wheat, many grasses, cabbages, peas, lettuce... they can grow under 5-15C, but they'll grow faster at 15-20C. For semi-tropical plants like tomatoes and peppers, as well as corn, beans, and many more, it's around 18-30C. And then for tropical plants 25-35C is probably the best. But 37C all day and all night, most greenhouses would ventilate to try to avoid that.

Yea, our internal temp is about 98 which means we need it to be cooler to be comfortable lol.

I agree a hot muggy night can be enjoyable, especially if swimming at night, but I hate not having AC on nights that hot. Not fun to sleep and my husband also sleeps hot so its no fun for either of us lol. I haven't had AC in a bedroom since living in Texas in 2017.
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Old 01-19-2023, 06:50 PM
 
Location: Libelińće, north Slovenia
12 posts, read 670 times
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I do not see it fit to express matter of subjective ideas, as fact? Cold is of great comfort to many.
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Old Yesterday, 06:18 PM
 
Location: Oklahoma (unfortunately)
224 posts, read 72,694 times
Reputation: 700
Pffffft. I know I'm in a minority in what my favorite temperature range is, but come on, now. There is no objectivity here. You can look at certain situations and say so and so climate is better for a person. Like, no doubt, if I was homeless, I wouldn't want to live in a climate that was below freezing a lot. However, since I'm not, I'm able to take a look at other factors.

(Also, I think it's interesting that from my understand, the introduction of air-conditioning drove a lot more people to leave the Northern states for the South. Without air conditioning, Southern states are unbearable for a lot of people, it turns out)

I speak for myself from here on out.

Comfort - 40s, 50s (not really cold at all, but below your threshold) are much more comfortable than anything above for me. In certain conditions I may have to put on a jacket, but I find that much more comfortable than heat. No contest. No matter what conditions, low humidity or high humidity, wind or no wind, clouds or no clouds, warm/hot air is inherently much less comfortable for me.

Cool/colder weather just makes me feel better. It gives the house a nice, natural cool feeling and allows for me to sleep under my covers, which is heaven.

I find it harder to breathe in the heat. That's a big problem for me.

Heat brings more life. You say that like it's a good thing. That "life" includes ticks, mosquitoes, wasps, and other dangerous or pesky bugs.

Those above factors all make warm/hot weather unbearable for me. I don't want to spend any time outside because 1. I can't breathe, 2. I'm super uncomfortable in a way that I can not relieve without going inside (whereas when it's chillier, you can put on layers) and 3. BUGS. There is no peace. Even if there are no ticks or wasps around, you have mosquitoes and other annoying flying insects that get in your face like gnats and flies. Plus, you can't leave the porch light on at night or you'll get swarmed by moths (I have a phobia of moths).

There is another thing about warm/hot weather that gets me: Severe thunderstorms and tornadoes, likewise hurricanes. They are formed in warmth/heat.

Overall, you couldn't pay me to live in a tropical climate. In fact, you couldn't pay me to live in the climate I currently live in. It's downright miserable.
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Old Yesterday, 07:02 PM
 
Location: Oakville, ON
3,895 posts, read 4,741,605 times
Reputation: 2254
Quote:
Originally Posted by WoodwindsRock View Post
Pffffft. I know I'm in a minority in what my favorite temperature range is, but come on, now. There is no objectivity here. You can look at certain situations and say so and so climate is better for a person. Like, no doubt, if I was homeless, I wouldn't want to live in a climate that was below freezing a lot. However, since I'm not, I'm able to take a look at other factors.

(Also, I think it's interesting that from my understand, the introduction of air-conditioning drove a lot more people to leave the Northern states for the South. Without air conditioning, Southern states are unbearable for a lot of people, it turns out)

I speak for myself from here on out.

Comfort - 40s, 50s (not really cold at all, but below your threshold) are much more comfortable than anything above for me. In certain conditions I may have to put on a jacket, but I find that much more comfortable than heat. No contest. No matter what conditions, low humidity or high humidity, wind or no wind, clouds or no clouds, warm/hot air is inherently much less comfortable for me.

Cool/colder weather just makes me feel better. It gives the house a nice, natural cool feeling and allows for me to sleep under my covers, which is heaven.

I find it harder to breathe in the heat. That's a big problem for me.

Heat brings more life. You say that like it's a good thing. That "life" includes ticks, mosquitoes, wasps, and other dangerous or pesky bugs.

Those above factors all make warm/hot weather unbearable for me. I don't want to spend any time outside because 1. I can't breathe, 2. I'm super uncomfortable in a way that I can not relieve without going inside (whereas when it's chillier, you can put on layers) and 3. BUGS. There is no peace. Even if there are no ticks or wasps around, you have mosquitoes and other annoying flying insects that get in your face like gnats and flies. Plus, you can't leave the porch light on at night or you'll get swarmed by moths (I have a phobia of moths).

There is another thing about warm/hot weather that gets me: Severe thunderstorms and tornadoes, likewise hurricanes. They are formed in warmth/heat.

Overall, you couldn't pay me to live in a tropical climate. In fact, you couldn't pay me to live in the climate I currently live in. It's downright miserable.
My dog picked up a tick this January here near Toronto, and the Canadian Arctic has loads of mosquitoes (at least during its summer), so it's gonna take a lot of cold to keep those at bay.

As for other bugs though, it is true that a lot of them don't make it as far as Canada. There's not a lot of cockroaches or termites, or poisonous spiders. One weird thing though is that when I was in Long Point beach on Lake Erie, there were a lot of spotted cucumber beetles trying to bite me. I've seen them a bit in my vegetable garden (although mostly the striped cucumber beetles in my garden) but they never bit me there.

Generally I'm not too bothered by mosquitoes, wasps or gnats but I wouldn't want to be in an area with a lot of bugs that can make you sick (ex Lyme disease) or poison you.

If it's just a moderately strong thunderstorm, with some gusts and rain showers, I find those fun to watch, but yeah, not interested in any tornadoes.

What temperature do you heat your house to? Mine is usually around 62-65F. <60F would feel rather chilly to me.
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