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View Poll Results: How would you rate the climate of Portland, OR?
A 10 18.87%
B 10 18.87%
C 17 32.08%
D 15 28.30%
F 1 1.89%
Voters: 53. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 04-06-2012, 06:44 PM
 
Location: Bellingham, WA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Weatherfan2 View Post
Cycling on wet roads even without the rain can be dangerous.

Five years ago I went storm chasing on my bicycle (before I upgraded to a car), and coming back, I rode quite quick downhill, on a wet road. I tried to stop for a junction, skidded, couldn't stop in time, fell off, and went into a stationary car. The bike was less than a week old. I also received injury.
Yes, you definitely have to exercise caution just as you would in a car, perhaps more so. Having the right tires can help a lot (and having tires that aren't worn out!), but you still don't want to try turning or stopping as aggressively as on dry pavement. I don't think I've ever had an accident on wet pavement, but 99% of my bike accidents occurred when I was a teenager, and I didn't ride in the rain back then. (I had some pretty spectacular crashes in dry conditions, though!)

Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
I find biking in very warm heavy rain (Temperature mid to high 70s, dew point low to mid 70s). No chill, any sweat gets washed off. Natural shower!
Those conditions are especially uncomfortable for me...if I'm wearing a raincoat. The coat causes so much sweat I'd be better off just shedding it altogether and getting soaked.
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Old 04-06-2012, 06:52 PM
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Location: Western Massachusetts
46,011 posts, read 53,149,397 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lamplight View Post
Those conditions are especially uncomfortable for me...if I'm wearing a raincoat. The coat causes so much sweat I'd be better off just shedding it altogether and getting soaked.
I was just wearing a bathing suit; it felt very similar to taking a shower, maybe slightly cooler than usual shower temperature.

The highest dew point I've experienced is probably from taking a shower set too warm on a hot day. I don't get why people like hot showers on hot days, especially without A/C. With A/C, it's a sign you've over-air conditioned. Some people I've lived tell me "it's refreshing". Others "I love A/C; hate heat, but I must have my shower hot."
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Old 04-06-2012, 06:59 PM
 
Location: Leeds, UK
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When I was younger, whenever it was hot, I would always take a cold bath. Always did the trick.

Nowadays I only have a shower and I hate taking cold showers
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Old 04-06-2012, 07:16 PM
 
Location: Bellingham, WA
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Yeah in TN I would take very cool showers early in the summer, and as I became more accustomed to the heat (as much as I could, at least) my showers would become gradually warmer, though still somewhat cool. I never take hot showers, only warm, even in winter. It makes me sweat afterward, and then I don't even feel clean!
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Old 04-06-2012, 07:29 PM
 
Location: Laurentia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
The highest dew point I've experienced is probably from taking a shower set too warm on a hot day. I don't get why people like hot showers on hot days, especially without A/C. With A/C, it's a sign you've over-air conditioned. Some people I've lived tell me "it's refreshing". Others "I love A/C; hate heat, but I must have my shower hot."
As for myself, if I need a cold shower for my comfort, it's a sign I'm too hot and need more air conditioning.

I prefer my showers hot; it just feels better to me and taking a shower in cold water is an unpleasant experience for me. I like to be able to take hot showers and emerge out of the shower in comfort. Due to my heat-averse physiology cold weather is optimal. It is quite refreshing to take a hot shower with a lot of steam, then emerge, open a window, and have 20F air flood the house .

Not being able to take as hot of a shower as I like, or even a cold shower, in hot weather is but one of the deprivations summer wreaks upon me.
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Old 04-06-2012, 07:45 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
15,317 posts, read 17,143,674 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
If you're referring to the same sensation I'm thinking of, I only get the prickly sensation in overheated indoor places in the cooler season; rarely in the warmer season, maybe because it has something to do with being constricted with more clothing. My ears tend to red when I feel too warm indoors. Anyone else?
Yes it happens to me all the time during the winter. I either have to go outside or splash water on my ears. Quite annoying.

My skin does get somewhat itchy when I got hot and sweaty, but I thought that happend to everyone.
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Old 06-29-2014, 06:22 PM
 
854 posts, read 1,472,081 times
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C because of the allergies, excessive cloud in the winter and lack of July and August rain.
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Old 06-29-2014, 10:03 PM
 
Location: Saskatoon - Saskatchewan, Canada
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There are 3 months between the warmest and the coldest month, and then 7 months between the coldest and the warmest, LOL
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Old 06-30-2014, 01:10 AM
 
Location: Sydney, Australia
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D+

The summers are the only good thing about it - pleasant and dry. The winters are just way too gloomy, wet and cool.

It's like Orange, NSW but with slightly warmer summers.
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Old 06-30-2014, 01:44 AM
 
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In the summer it doesn't matter to me and I will take cold or hot showers depending on the time of day. Usually cold before bed so I can lower body temperature and fall asleep faster.

In the winter it must be a hot shower or else I will be absolutely frozen when I get out due to dry air.
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