U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Weather
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
View Poll Results: China vs the United States:
China 9 12.33%
the United States 64 87.67%
Voters: 73. You may not vote on this poll

Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-11-2019, 06:03 PM
 
75 posts, read 45,380 times
Reputation: 43

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Subscribe View Post
USA has Mediterranean climates. China doesn't have such a thing.

USA wins.
China has similar climates compare to Mediterranean climates . Kunming's climate is similar to San Francisco's climate, cool(not cold) in winter and warm(not hot) in summer, even better than San Francisco.

January:
Kunming: 38-59F
San Francisco: 46-57F

July:
Kunming: 63-76F
San Francisco: 54-68F
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-11-2019, 08:11 PM
 
Location: Toronto
222 posts, read 80,918 times
Reputation: 155
I prefer US climates by a longshot for the diversity and day-to-day variance. Compared to the highly changeable weather in the US, in China it just seems very repetitive with very small changes in temperature each day.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-12-2019, 02:23 PM
 
75 posts, read 45,380 times
Reputation: 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by segfault1361 View Post
I prefer US climates by a longshot for the diversity and day-to-day variance. Compared to the highly changeable weather in the US, in China it just seems very repetitive with very small changes in temperature each day.
China might seems repetitive with relatively small changes in temperature in summer(hot and humid: 75-90F), but it has highly changeable weather in winter, especially when cold fronts move from Siberia to South China, [One day in January : eg.(Min42F, Max70F) Sunny], cold in the morning and very warm in the afternoon, sunny skies and dry weather, which is very similar to US. Also, California does not have highly changeable weather compared to the east coast, eg. San Francisco: 50-70 every day for most of the year, Los Angeles: 45-95, but 60-80 from March to November.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-18-2020, 04:28 AM
 
41 posts, read 16,949 times
Reputation: 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by QIDb602 View Post
I will count the population of the colder provinces/areas of China and the warmer provinces/areas:

Colder areas: Shandong (96m), Henan (94m), Hebei (71m), Liaoning (45m), Heilongjiang (38m), Shaanxi (37m), Shanxi (36m), Jilin (27m), Gansu (26m), Inner Mongolia (25m), Xinjiang (22m), Beijing (20m), Tianjin (13m), Ningxia (6.3m), Qinghai (5.6m), Tibet (3.0m)

Total: 564.9m

Warmer areas: Guangdong (104m), Sichuan (80m), Jiangsu (79m), Hunan (66m), Anhui (60m), Hubei (57m), Zhejiang (54m), Guangxi (46m), Yunnan (46m), Jiangxi (45m), Fujian (37m), Guizhou (35m), Chongqing (29m), Shanghai (23m), Hainan (9.2m), Hong Kong (7.1m), Macau (552k)

Total: 777.852m

Note that the warmer areas generally have average annual means of at least 16C, which is warmer than Virginia Beach. Taking this into account, I will count the population of the colder and warmer states of the USA:

Colder states: NY (20m), PA (13m), IL (13m), OH (12m), MI (10.0m), NJ (9.0m), VA (8.5m), WA (7.4m), MA (6.9m), IN (6.7m), MO (6.1m), MD (6.1m), WI (5.8m), CO (5.6m), MN (5.6m), KY (4.5m), OR (4.1m), CT (3.6m), IA (3.1m), UT (3.1m), KS (2.9m), NE (1.9m), WV (1.8m), ID (1.7m), NH (1.3m), ME (1.3m), RI (1.1m), MT (1.1m), DE (962k), SD (870k), ND (755k), AK (740k), VT (624k), WY (579k)

Total: 171.73m

Warmer states: CA (40m), TX (28m), FL (21m), GA (10m), NC (10m), AZ (7.0m), TN (6.7m), SC (5.0m), AL (4.9m), LA (4.7m), OK (3.9m), AR (3.0m), NV (3.0m), MS (3.0m), NM (2.1m), HI (1.4m)

Territories: PR (3.3m), GU (162k), VI (104k), AS (57k), MP (52k)

Total: 157.375m

And note that even though CA is counted as a warm state, San Francisco only has an annual mean of 14.1C, which is lower than some capitals of the colder Chinese provinces, like Zhengzhou and my birthplace of Jinan.

We can now see that China is warmer overall when consider population now. A big reason for it is that Chinese climates tend to be warmer in the shoulder seasons if summer and winter temperatures are the same. Another major reason is that Chinese climates tend to have warmer summer lows.

However, the USA might be warmer if we only take winters into account.
Your entire criteria for the US is skewed towards undercounting American states that you fit under the warm category and over-counting those to consider cold.

You arbitrarily classify a lot of the more moderate, in-between states of the US as cold (Kentucky, Delaware, Virginia, West Virginia, Missouri, and oceanic states like Washington and Oregon), while at the same time, somehow, arbitrarily classifying provinces like Jiangsu, Henan, Sichuan, and Shanghai, when many of these provinces are consistently colder than the states I mentioned above, and have plenty of cold mountainous regions.

Overall, going off of averages, the US is warmer. Average daytime highs in the winter are warmer. The US also matches much of China in heat and humidity in summer, while the southwest of the US gets hotter in the summer than anywhere in China, with warmer winters to boot.

Fall isn’t uniformly colder than China all throughout the US, and the only season in which the US is mostly colder than China is spring.

So your bizarre attempt to refute facts by arbitrarily categorizing larger American states and Chinese provinces into broad categories of “warm” and “cold” really didn’t work.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-18-2020, 04:30 AM
 
41 posts, read 16,949 times
Reputation: 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bettafish View Post
I was talking about the climate per se, without irrigation systems.

Another issue with the west coast of America is the summer temperatures are not stable enough (especially in the north) for certain crops. During rice flowering, the best temperature is 25~30 C (77~86 F), and a long-term cool temperature of 17 C (63 F) or lower can kill the flowers.

While rice can grow at 45 N in China, in the US it typically cannot grow beyond SF area in CA. The Midwest of America has horrible winters, but the summer weather is actually better for agriculture than CA.
Um...rice is most often grown in southern Missouri and northern Arkansas in the US, and all sorts of rice is grown in many regions of the US...just not commercially.

The climate of the US is perfectly suited to rice. How do you think a third of the country was able to grow cotton?
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-18-2020, 04:36 AM
 
41 posts, read 16,949 times
Reputation: 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magicstar1 View Post
Yes, but only during the daytime. Most areas in China have very high nighttime temperatures compared to the US.

For example, Atlanta, Georgia has an Average low of 34 and is located in the Southern Corner of the Country.


For a city that has a low that close to the freezing mark in China, you have to go to the far North or far inland in the country.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fuzhou#Climate
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shanghai#Climate
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hangzhou#Climate
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nanchang#Climate


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Washington,_D.C.#Climate
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charlo...nd_environment
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chicago#Climate
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St._Louis#Climate
1) You will not experience nighttime temperatures, and most are not “much higher” in China

2) Nanchang, a city that is analogously placed in China (compared to Atlanta in the US) has an average low in January of 36 degrees vs Atlanta’s 34. So this just isn’t true.

Many regions of China, certainly not “only the far north of the country”, gets average lows like that. The far north of China gets far lower average lows than anything seen in the contiguous US.

And then you list a bunch of arbitrary city climates, cherry picking warmer, southern Chinese cities to compare to colder, mostly northern American cities. You’re drawing a bunch of false equivalencies to claim China is “warmer” when it’s not. It’s average lows *aren’t* much higher, it’s winters are typically much colder on average, it has comparable summers, overall, and yet cannot get as hot, and alternately as mild, as America’s warmest regions.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-18-2020, 04:44 AM
 
41 posts, read 16,949 times
Reputation: 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bettafish View Post
Med climate is comfortable for humans but not really good for agriculture. Summer precipitation is way too low.

Mainland China also has some frost free regions, and about 1/5 of China never recorded -15 C or lower.

However all of contiguous US has records of 0 C or lower. The vast majority has -15 C or lower.
Many regions of the contiguous US, notably the southwest and the west coast, have not seen record lows below 0 C

But most regions of China and the US have.

A record low temperature is a futile deliberation and doesn’t do anything to dispute the fact that, on average, the US is absolutely the warmer country.

A third of the US falls under the humid subtropical classification. A subzero record cold snap doesn’t make the US colder, especially considering that, in any location much below the Ohio river, snaps that extreme are very anomalous. Southern China gets plenty of moderate cold snaps too, and the fact is incontrovertible: much of China sees about equal summers, but quite a bit colder winters, on average. The US is warmer. Just because the US has been historically more prone to a rare severe cold snap, a record temperature anomaly amounts to a natural disaster. It should not be used to evaluate at all the status quo of a climate, or else, Kentucky would be subarctic, Florida temperate, and Minnesota arctic.

Your evaluation of climate, and of the US climate relative to China, doesn’t make sense.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-18-2020, 11:04 AM
 
897 posts, read 380,779 times
Reputation: 364
Quote:
Originally Posted by creneb56 View Post
Your entire criteria for the US is skewed towards undercounting American states that you fit under the warm category and over-counting those to consider cold.

You arbitrarily classify a lot of the more moderate, in-between states of the US as cold (Kentucky, Delaware, Virginia, West Virginia, Missouri, and oceanic states like Washington and Oregon), while at the same time, somehow, arbitrarily classifying provinces like Jiangsu, Henan, Sichuan, and Shanghai, when many of these provinces are consistently colder than the states I mentioned above, and have plenty of cold mountainous regions.

Overall, going off of averages, the US is warmer. Average daytime highs in the winter are warmer. The US also matches much of China in heat and humidity in summer, while the southwest of the US gets hotter in the summer than anywhere in China, with warmer winters to boot.

Fall isn’t uniformly colder than China all throughout the US, and the only season in which the US is mostly colder than China is spring.

So your bizarre attempt to refute facts by arbitrarily categorizing larger American states and Chinese provinces into broad categories of “warm” and “cold” really didn’t work.
These classifications are by no means arbitrary. The reality is that locations in China with the same midwinter temperatures as the US tend to be warmer on average throughout the year. You can't compare Beijing and Chicago or Boston because midwinter is similar. Beijing is more similar to the US upper South outside of winter

Places like Kentucky, Delaware, Virginia, West Virginia, Missouri, etc. have about the same average annual temperature as the North China Plain.

Also I put Henan in the cold category. In general I put states/provinces with the main population centers having average annual temperatures below 15.5-16C into the cold category.

Here are some comparisons. China doesn't use a simple (daily max+daily min)/2 formula and instead records temperature on four separate times per day. This causes China's average temperatures on Wikipedia to generally be colder. In order to make it a fair comparison, it needs to be (daily max+daily min)/2 both ways.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louisv...ntucky#Climate 14.55C
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nanjin...nd_environment 16.35C [(20.6C+12.1C)/2]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St._Louis#Climate 13.9C
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zhengzhou#Climate 15.1C

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charle...rginia#Climate 13.15C
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chengdu#Climate 16.9C
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geogra...eijing#Climate (1981-2010) 13.4C (!)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virgin...rginia#Climate 15.7C
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shanghai#Climate 17.35C

Also the more maritime states like WA and OR have winters comparable to Shanghai but summers that are more like Shanghai's fall. Portland's annual temperature is a full degree colder than Beijing, and Seattle's is similar to Dalian, so they don't compare to South China. Even much of northern California has cooler average annual temperatures that are more comparable to those of the North China Plain.

And if you say that winter is more important or that highs are more important than lows, then make your own comparison. I am just comparing which one is objectively warmer/colder, not which one feels warmer/colder.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-19-2020, 04:05 PM
 
93 posts, read 32,799 times
Reputation: 65
China has Dwx. USA hasn't.
So China is better.

But overall these 2 countries have ones of best climates in the world..
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-20-2020, 08:16 AM
 
Location: Buenos Aires and La Plata, ARG
2,694 posts, read 2,286,428 times
Reputation: 1866
China as a whole averages a mean T of 6.9ºC (all years of record keeping)
https://crudata.uea.ac.uk/~timm/cty/.../obs.China.htm
Or currently a mean of 7.6ºC
Berkeley Earth

USA as a whole averages a mean T of 8.5ºC (all years of record keeping)
https://crudata.uea.ac.uk/~timm/cty/...ta/obs.USA.htm
Or currently a mean of 9.6ºC
Berkeley Earth
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Weather

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2021, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top