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Old 05-30-2012, 06:33 AM
 
Location: Perth, Western Australia
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Vladivostok, Russia is the highest latitude place (43N) that I know of where the winter is sunnier than the summer.

Vladivostok - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Quote:
That's interesting. I never considered/thought about that too much before (number of clear/cloudless hours, day or night) rather than just number of sun hours. Is this a type of data often displayed?
I know BOM provides information for some stations where 9am and 3pm readings of cloud cover are given in oktas. While it's not perfect as some areas may receive more or less clear skies during night-time hours, it can give a rough idea of relative cloudiness between the seasons.
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Old 05-31-2012, 06:16 AM
 
Location: Sydney, Australia
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Pretty much anywhere on the east coast of Australia is sunnier in winter, in some cases not in terms of absolute sunshine hours though because of the shorter days. Westerly winds lose all of their moisture on the Great Dividing Range, leading to mostly clear skies on the coastal plain through the winter months. The exception is when we get a stronger front, north-west cloud band or an East Coast Low. In summer westerlies are rare as easterly maritime air dominates, bringing humidity and hence cloud and rain.
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Old 05-31-2012, 06:59 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
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Originally Posted by dxnerd86 View Post
Pretty much anywhere on the east coast of Australia is sunnier in winter, in some cases not in terms of absolute sunshine hours though because of the shorter days. Westerly winds lose all of their moisture on the Great Dividing Range, leading to mostly clear skies on the coastal plain through the winter months. The exception is when we get a stronger front, north-west cloud band or an East Coast Low. In summer westerlies are rare as easterly maritime air dominates, bringing humidity and hence cloud and rain.
Sydney has more sunshine hours (absolute) in August and possibly July than January or February. Shows you how much sunnier it really is in winter. Having spent time there in both summer and winter I can vouch for this. It's complicated though because June is actually the wettest month, and is considerably wetter/cloudier than the second half of July and August. Likewise December tends to be drier and sunnier than Jan/Feb.
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Old 05-31-2012, 07:01 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
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In most of the world the warm season tends to be wetter than the dry season. The only climates with a marked winter rainfall maximum are the Mediterranean, a few lower latitude west coast temperate climates, and certain arid climes like Iraq, Arabia, parts of Southern California.

Many climates have a cloudiness maximum in the warmer months, even in the temperate zone. They include much of Eastern Australia, East Asia - Central and Northern China, Eastern Japan, and South Africa.
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Old 05-31-2012, 01:15 PM
 
Location: Wellington and North of South
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I've cited the Sydney approximate sunshine % values before (astronomical possible daylight, not measureable), but here they are again:

53 54 56 61 59 60 65 72 66 61 55 55 59.5 (annual).
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Old 06-01-2012, 05:14 AM
 
Location: Eastern Sydney, Australia
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Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
Sydney has more sunshine hours (absolute) in August and possibly July than January or February. Shows you how much sunnier it really is in winter. Having spent time there in both summer and winter I can vouch for this. It's complicated though because June is actually the wettest month, and is considerably wetter/cloudier than the second half of July and August. Likewise December tends to be drier and sunnier than Jan/Feb.
Depends yearly of course. July 1993 had just 135 hrs of sun and August 1998 161 hrs.
December, on average, has the highest hours of sun with 243.8 hours, and August in second place with 243.
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Old 02-07-2021, 11:44 PM
 
Location: Sydney, Australia
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Sydney somewhat fits the bill. August is the sunniest month of the year. And July is sunnier than February.

Ironically, June is the cloudiest or 'darkest' month.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sydney#Climate
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Old 02-08-2021, 05:53 AM
B87
 
Location: Surrey/London
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In 2008 February was sunnier than August here.
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Old 02-08-2021, 08:13 AM
 
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Eastern Asia and Russia, more specifically cities like Harbin and Vladivostok which are affected by the Siberian High, which brings sunny, cold weather during winter and the East Asian Monsoon, which brings wet, cloudy weather during summer.
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Old 02-08-2021, 09:47 AM
 
Location: St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
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Canadian Maritime's have pretty balanced sunshine throughout the year.

Saint John, New Brunswick gets 44% possible sunshine in January and 47.7% possible sunshine in July.
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