U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Weather
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 06-22-2012, 05:29 PM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
12,609 posts, read 12,320,352 times
Reputation: 5785

Advertisements

Milton MA, 12 miles southwest of Boston, averages 2358 annual hours of sun while Boston averages 2638.

Milton, Massachusetts - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Boston - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Milton lies between Boston and the Blue Hills. Would hills reaching over 600 feet diminish sunshine by close to 300 hours?

Then I noticed on this site: http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/oa/climate/...ccd/pctpos.txt

that Blue Hill, MA right adjacent to Milton averages only 52% percent possible sun while Boston averages 58%. I noticed that Blue Hill receives around 8" more rainfall per year than Boston, but I am thinking the rainfall would be due to more pulling out moisture from weather systems over both locations, rather than inducing clouds while Boston remains clear.

When moving inland from the coast (Boston sunshine measured at Logan right on the ocean) could sunshine drop that dramatically over the course of 12 miles and 600 feet in elevation?

Any situations like this in any other countries around the world or within the US?

I wonder if people in the western burbs of Boston go into the city for sunshine, lol.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-22-2012, 07:48 PM
 
Location: Wellington and North of South
5,127 posts, read 7,752,563 times
Reputation: 2629
Quote:
Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
Milton MA, 12 miles southwest of Boston, averages 2358 annual hours of sun while Boston averages 2638.

Milton, Massachusetts - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Boston - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Milton lies between Boston and the Blue Hills. Would hills reaching over 600 feet diminish sunshine by close to 300 hours?

Then I noticed on this site: http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/oa/climate/...ccd/pctpos.txt

that Blue Hill, MA right adjacent to Milton averages only 52% percent possible sun while Boston averages 58%. I noticed that Blue Hill receives around 8" more rainfall per year than Boston, but I am thinking the rainfall would be due to more pulling out moisture from weather systems over both locations, rather than inducing clouds while Boston remains clear.

When moving inland from the coast (Boston sunshine measured at Logan right on the ocean) could sunshine drop that dramatically over the course of 12 miles and 600 feet in elevation?

Any situations like this in any other countries around the world or within the US?

I wonder if people in the western burbs of Boston go into the city for sunshine, lol.
Perhaps Blue Hill's measurements are more accurate ... and what are the timespans?
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-22-2012, 09:19 PM
B87
 
Location: Surrey/London
11,786 posts, read 9,299,595 times
Reputation: 3065
Milton's sunshine averages are from 1961-1990, Boston's are 1981-2010.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-22-2012, 09:24 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Western Massachusetts
46,079 posts, read 48,366,675 times
Reputation: 15081
Quote:
Originally Posted by B87 View Post
Milton's sunshine averages are from 1961-1990, Boston's are 1981-2010.
So not only do we have global warming, we have global sunniness upon us!
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-22-2012, 10:05 PM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
12,609 posts, read 12,320,352 times
Reputation: 5785
Quote:
Originally Posted by RWood View Post
Perhaps Blue Hill's measurements are more accurate ... and what are the timespans?
I think you may be right. Blue Hill Observatory seems to take their weather pretty seriously, and is a scientific observatory and not part of NOAA.

Blue Hill Meteorological Observatory


So as someone from the state you don't think it possible that it is due to being inland from the sea (sea breeze pushing clouds inland) and the elevation?

I wonder what instrument they use to measure sunshine. It doesn't tell you on the website, but the record for sunshine goes back to the late 1800's.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Weather
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:00 PM.

© 2005-2022, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top