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Old 06-26-2012, 05:12 PM
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Location: Western Massachusetts
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SophieLL View Post
what 200-300 hours substracted? i dont undertstand
If you compare the sunshine hours of cities very close to each other, for example, Detroit, Michigan and Windsor, Ontario, Detroit records 200 more. Might not be realistic to have a big difference in a short distance.
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Old 06-26-2012, 05:17 PM
 
Location: Yorkshire, England
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SophieLL View Post
what 200-300 hours substracted? i dont undertstand

and what are the numbers of the countries you listed? do you have a list of sunshine hours by country? would like to see that one!
What he means is that 3000 hours calculated the US way might be only the same as 2800 calculated anywhere else, so the figures are not comparable. Also because the US is so climatically diverse it has plenty of gloomier surface area (especially considering 15-20% of it is Alaska) to bring the sun averages down. I'd expect the single sunniest country would be a small, climatically homogenous country in the Middle East or North Africa somewhere, but I'd have no idea about which one or how much.
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Old 06-26-2012, 05:22 PM
 
Location: Yorkshire, England
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RWood View Post
Thanks, so I'm guessing the median sun average is a little under nine hours a day, so between 3000-3200 hours perhaps.
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Old 06-26-2012, 05:30 PM
 
Location: London, UK
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Taiwan looks really gloomy as well; Taipei is cloudier than London.
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Old 06-26-2012, 05:38 PM
 
Location: Toronto
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SophieLL View Post
Isnt USA one of the sunniest??

I mean, USA is super sunny, and the sunniest places in the world are in USA, right??
The sunniest place in the world is said to be Yuma, Arizona but I do wonder if many people knowledgeable about climatology either think it's reasonable or doubts it, since a lot of doubt has been expressed on this forum about comparability of US data to other countries' data. So, are there many people who think based on arguing over recording methods or perhaps the idea that some areas that could be as sunny, such as the Sahara, don't have as good a sample size, that it might not be the clear-cut winner?

Or is it well accepted that Yuma is the sunniest place on earth (I've seen it mentioned so many times and in the record books)? I'm just curious to be honest.
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Old 06-26-2012, 05:48 PM
 
Location: Yorkshire, England
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dhdh View Post
Taiwan looks really gloomy as well; Taipei is cloudier than London.
Good idea - I never knew Taipei was that bad (its hot+cloudy climate looks horrendous, btw), but Taiwan's second city, Kaohsiung, gets 2200 hours, way more than anywhere in our top five.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Stumbler. View Post
The sunniest place in the world is said to be Yuma, Arizona but I do wonder if many people knowledgeable about climatology either think it's reasonable or doubts it, since a lot of doubt has been expressed on this forum about comparability of US data to other countries' data. So, are there many people who think based on arguing over recording methods or perhaps the idea that some areas that could be as sunny, such as the Sahara, don't have as good a sample size, that it might not be the clear-cut winner?

Or is it well accepted that Yuma is the sunniest place on earth (I've seen it mentioned so many times and in the record books)? I'm just curious to be honest.
I'd reckon it's almost certainly not the exact sunniest place on Earth, it's just there's no weather station anywhere that gets more to prove otherwise. If I was in charge of such things I'd try and deliberately set up weather stations in these obscure microclimates out there to see the limits of Earth's climate actually are.
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Old 06-26-2012, 06:15 PM
 
Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina
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oh, i didnt know about the 200-300 substraction thing. When a thread gets too technical, i just leave it, cause i dont really know much about meteorology and theres only so much my brain can contain.


Quote:
Originally Posted by ben86 View Post
Good idea - I never knew Taipei was that bad (its hot+cloudy climate looks horrendous, btw), but Taiwan's second city, Kaohsiung, gets 2200 hours, way more than anywhere in our top five.




I'd reckon it's almost certainly not the exact sunniest place on Earth, it's just there's no weather station anywhere that gets more to prove otherwise. If I was in charge of such things I'd try and deliberately set up weather stations in these obscure microclimates out there to see the limits of Earth's climate actually are.

wow, taipei climate sounds AWFUL. Hot/Humid/Cloudy: probably the worst combination EVER!
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Old 06-26-2012, 06:28 PM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ben86 View Post
What he means is that 3000 hours calculated the US way might be only the same as 2800 calculated anywhere else, so the figures are not comparable. Also because the US is so climatically diverse it has plenty of gloomier surface area (especially considering 15-20% of it is Alaska) to bring the sun averages down. I'd expect the single sunniest country would be a small, climatically homogenous country in the Middle East or North Africa somewhere, but I'd have no idea about which one or how much.
I think for sunniest maybe look at driest regions continents and those within the desert belt surrounding the tropics. Saudi Arabia, Australia, Sahara region, etc. The sunniest have to be in those regions I would think. Are you sure the gloomiest are all in N Europe? No where in Asia?
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Old 06-26-2012, 06:30 PM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ben86 View Post
Good idea - I never knew Taipei was that bad (its hot+cloudy climate looks horrendous, btw), but Taiwan's second city, Kaohsiung, gets 2200 hours, way more than anywhere in our top five.




I'd reckon it's almost certainly not the exact sunniest place on Earth, it's just there's no weather station anywhere that gets more to prove otherwise. If I was in charge of such things I'd try and deliberately set up weather stations in these obscure microclimates out there to see the limits of Earth's climate actually are.
I'd even say Death Valley or some part of it gets more sun than Yuma. It is just that Yuma is a substantial city.
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Old 06-26-2012, 06:42 PM
 
Location: Toronto
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
Are you sure the gloomiest are all in N Europe? No where in Asia?
If you're going by countries, it seems like North European countries do have cloudy climates throughout their single country's area.

I may be wrong, but it looks like some other cloudy climates seem to be part of countries that also have reasonably sunnier climates in another region of that country so it might even out (for example, China).
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