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Old 10-01-2007, 02:23 PM
 
Location: Perth, Western Australia
9,594 posts, read 25,257,954 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aiangel_writer View Post
Wow, I had no idea of the details that one must do in order to winterize things. I have come to the conclusion I love living here, where it cools off, but does not require such drastic measures for survival and ability to move around via vehicle.
Well it's not as difficult for most people as I made it sound.

For people who live here we don't need to buy a different battery or oil because we probably wouldn't buy batteries or oil that are meant for extended life in warm-to-hot weather in the first place. Same with coolant; it's okay to run the winter stuff year-round.

The main things northerners have to do are:

- check tread depth and/or put on snow tires
- inspect wiper blades
- buy washer fluid
- make sure there's at least one good ice scraper
- perhaps snow brush and maybe small shovel

If someone from south drives north in the winter, there are plenty of things that can stop their car though.
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Old 10-02-2007, 12:08 AM
 
Location: So. Dak.
13,495 posts, read 35,129,224 times
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Angel, it just sounds complicated cause it's things that people who live further south wouldn't already have. We buy containers of Heet at Kmart when they're on sale so we have them on hand for winter. (Much cheaper then buying them at the gas station when you fill gas) Our cars already have the plug-ins. We've already gotten new batteries a couple months ago so they'll be ok for a few years. We already have winter coats and jackets and jeans. My DH has coveralls and long johns, too. I'm a thrifty shopper so we just get new ones after Christmas when they put them on sale for half price. We do still need to have the oil changed and spark plugs checked, etc. Our tires are nearly new so we don't have to worry about them. We always get all season radials and since we live in the same town we work in now, we don't buy snow tires anymore. We already have a snow blower plus snow shovels, ice scrapers, etc. Those things last forever so we don't really go out and buy that stuff every year.

Before we moved into town (11 years ago), we always had a few blankets in the car plus candy bars plus a snow shovel, extra mittens, etc. We only had to drive 12 miles on the interstate to get over here, but that can even be treacherous in a snow blizzard. So we don't really have that much prep to do. It's just suggestions for someone who wouldn't already have most of those things on hand. It's actually all necessity cause you could easily freeze to death up here.
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Old 10-02-2007, 09:24 AM
 
Location: Bourbonnais, IL
1,355 posts, read 3,914,248 times
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Our preparations for the winter season? Well mine would include: putting a blanket on the back seat of the car (that leather can get cold), finding where I ditched my snow shovel last March, finding the ice scraper, and putting sand bags in the back of my truck. That would be the extent of preparing for an Oklahoma winter.
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Old 10-02-2007, 09:36 AM
 
Location: Mississippi
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I have been known to go around with a load of wood in the back of the truck during an ice storm before. I'm just really glad we have mainly messy, cool and wet winters here. OF course, the dampness does seep into your bones making you feel totally chilled from the inside out at times, but that I can handle better than so much slushy snow and sub zero temps!
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Old 10-02-2007, 09:02 PM
 
Location: Spots Wyoming
18,696 posts, read 38,400,420 times
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Living in Wyoming, we probably have a little worse winter then most. But something I've found VERY VERY useful.

Ever been in a bad snow and you were chugging along at 15 mph wondering where the heck your at on your trip? Can't see good enough to see landmarks?

Turn on your GPS. It's nice to know that your only 4 miles from town so you can worry a lot less. Of if you get stuck. It's nice to know that your 1 mile from an exit that has a filling station or help.

$150 life saver. And, you can use it for so much much more.
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Old 10-02-2007, 09:50 PM
 
Location: Las Vegas
14,193 posts, read 27,094,249 times
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I put a big Yankee Candle and some packs of matches in every vehicle. The heat can make a big difference if you get stuck somewhere rural and have to wait for help. Also everyone has a cell phone.
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Old 10-03-2007, 09:04 AM
 
Location: Perth, Western Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yellowsnow View Post
I put a big Yankee Candle and some packs of matches in every vehicle. The heat can make a big difference if you get stuck somewhere rural and have to wait for help. Also everyone has a cell phone.
Be carefull with that, a lot of people die from carbon monoxide poisoning when trying to warm up with some source of flame in places that they aren't meant for.
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Old 10-04-2007, 04:23 PM
 
Location: Sunny Naples Florida :)
1,452 posts, read 2,098,244 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jgussler View Post
Living in Wyoming, we probably have a little worse winter then most. But something I've found VERY VERY useful.

Ever been in a bad snow and you were chugging along at 15 mph wondering where the heck your at on your trip? Can't see good enough to see landmarks?

Turn on your GPS. It's nice to know that your only 4 miles from town so you can worry a lot less. Of if you get stuck. It's nice to know that your 1 mile from an exit that has a filling station or help.

$150 life saver. And, you can use it for so much much more.
I loveee the gps systems. We bought one for christmas last year, you can get them very inexpensivly and they pay for themselves in the long run. We drove from Fla to NH and I couldn't get over in a lane in DC and well we ended up in the GHETTO of DC.. it was bad bad bad and that thing go us right out in no time!! We would have been lost otherwise.
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Old 10-06-2007, 01:38 AM
 
11 posts, read 29,868 times
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I hate to say that here in Nebraska my preparation for winter is after the first frost I look for the scraper. When it snows I find my brush to go with my scraper for the windows of the car. I don't think much about tires since the tires are only a tiny part of driving in the snow. If you have a 4x4 you'll do better than I will with my little FWD car but I get around. I wear short sleeves year round just add sweaters and blankets and a fire when it's below zero. I see GPS above, I was lost in Omaha last year when we had a blizzard. I recognized the turnoff and the snow lightened up enough for me to figure it out from there. I'd miss four seasons and fall is my favorite time!! With the leaves changing, etc.
Love reading what you all post!!! From North and South
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Old 10-06-2007, 01:46 AM
 
Location: southern california
61,305 posts, read 79,754,076 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aiangel_writer View Post
People along the coastal areas prepare for hurricane season, we who live in tornado alley and dixie alley prepare for tornadoes.

So, do people in the North prepare for winter? If you do, what/how do you prepare.

I'm sure it is more than going to the nearest Home Depot and buying a snow shovel, LOL.
warmer hawaian shirts.
socks on sandels instead of bare feet.
hat instead of bare head.
stephen s
san diego ca
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