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Old 07-12-2012, 09:16 AM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
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A new study of tree-ring data has concluded that not only has our climate often been noticeably hotter than today, temperatures have actually been on a falling trend for the past 2,000 years.

Measurements stretching back to 138BC prove that the Earth is slowly cooling -0.3┬░C per millennium due to gradual changes to the position of the sun and an increase in the distance between the Earth and the sun.

The climate was HOTTER in Roman and Medieval times than it is now

“We found that previous estimates of historical temperatures during the Roman era and the Middle Ages were too low,”

This graph demonstrates what’s really happened in the past 2,000 years:



Read more with Link:
http://iceagenow.info/2012/07/finding-earth-cooling-2000-years/
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Old 07-12-2012, 09:18 AM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
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Key to this constant debate is to mention a "timeframe"..I'm glad they mentioned one. Looking at the graph I do see how we warmed recently but overall, planet is cooling. We did have some upticks along the way then back down we went. I wonder if thats whats happening now.
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Old 07-12-2012, 10:16 AM
 
Location: Laurentia
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These are just summer temperatures, but it is rather interesting, assuming the tree-ring findings are accurate (they seem to be, but there's always uncertainty). The Roman climate seems to be roughly comparable to today's, and there appears to be a little bit of cycling involved.

Of course if man-made CO2 emissions completely overwhelm the climate system, as most AGW adherents predict, then the temperatures will exceed even the Roman warming, but as it is now summer temperatures aren't unprecedented. I always appreciate new findings that challenge our previous understanding of climate.

What I find even more interesting is the very long-term trend of what's called the "Cenozoic cooling". This acts on such long timescales that all of the human-caused CO2 will have been cycled out of the environment before it can even make a dent in the trend (even if there is a catastrophe we will run out of fossil fuels within a millennium). Over the past 50 million years, there's actually a strong cooling trend. With the current and projected position of the continents, I expect that to continue for at least the next 30-50 million years. After that it really depends on what happens with continental drift, which after that timeframe can only be guessed at. Projections that indicate the closing of the Atlantic would end the current ice ages and warm the climate a great deal, back to Mesozoic-like levels with no polar ice caps. On the other hand, there are other projections which predict that current trends will continue with the Pacific closing up on the north end and a general northward movement of all the continents (with an America-Asia collision). If this happens, then the current cold climate state will be intensified further, and that particular continental configuration would be quite similar to what occurred during Snowball Earth, which would continue the strong cooling trend. Even under this projection, the climate would eventually warm up, because of the sun's luminosity increase, which will be 10% above current levels in 1 billion years. However, this potential ice world is on the order of 50-200 million years from now and wouldn't be stymied by the sun's brightening.

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Old 07-12-2012, 11:06 AM
B87
 
Location: Surrey/London
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It's well known that the Romans had vineyards in northern England during their occupation. Good luck trying that now
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Old 07-12-2012, 12:06 PM
 
Location: Yorkshire, England
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Quote:
Originally Posted by B87 View Post
It's well known that the Romans had vineyards in northern England during their occupation. Good luck trying that now
Point taken that it was warmer then, but there is a vineyard nowadays in Morecambe Bay at 54N:

Cote de Morecambe: Raising a glass to the most northerly vineyard in Britain | Mail Online

Oddly enough it isn't the world's most northerly vineyard - somehow somebody has found a way to produce wine in Latvia at 57N:

Sabile wine hill | Official Latvian Tourism Portal
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Old 05-22-2013, 04:30 AM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
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Forgot to post the actual link to the study based article.

Climate in northern Europe reconstructed for the past 2,000 years: Cooling trend calculated precisely for the first time


Climate in northern Europe reconstructed for the past 2,000 years: Cooling trend calculated precisely for the first time.
Calculations prepared by Mainz scientists will also influence the way current climate change is perceived


An international team including scientists from Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) has published a reconstruction of the climate in northern Europe over the last 2,000 years based on the information provided by tree-rings. Professor Dr. Jan Esper's group at the Institute of Geography at JGU used tree-ring density measurements from sub-fossil pine trees originating from Finnish Lapland to produce a reconstruction reaching back to 138 BC

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Old 05-22-2013, 04:59 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Western Massachusetts
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This looks like it's reflecting just European trends, maybe just northern Europe considering the labels. Looking at subfossil trees might also not give much information on recent decades. The graphs seems to disagree in shape with global temperature data based on stations or satellites, which wouldn't have a sub peak some decades earlier.
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Old 05-22-2013, 07:02 AM
 
Location: Portsmouth, UK
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It is well known that the clmate was warmer in the UK during Medieval times, but this was just a period of warming, then we had a period of cooling, then warming etc... This is what the worlds weather does & always has done...
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