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Old 11-21-2015, 06:32 AM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
83,502 posts, read 75,252,292 times
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No, it's not avoiding the QuadCities! Here's why there's a donut on the radar.

Evaporational cooling in action was seen on the Quad Cities radar last night! #NerdAlert




https://twitter.com/NWSQuadCities/st...224833/photo/1
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Old 01-10-2016, 10:42 AM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
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Anyone want to explain this? Im still learning extra details of soundings.

https://twitter.com/TomNiziol/status/686227174668529664
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Old 01-10-2016, 11:22 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Western Massachusetts
45,983 posts, read 53,454,351 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cambium View Post
Anyone want to explain this? Im still learning extra details of soundings.

https://twitter.com/TomNiziol/status/686227174668529664
Well CAPE measures the potential energy of a parcel... how much and how fast it will rise from convection. More moist air rising fast over a lake means more lake effects snow. High convection also means more likely for thunderstorms. EL is the equilibrium, level at which the moist lake air parcel is no longer buoyant... highest elevation of convection. So I would think higher EL = air rises higher = more convection, more potential for lake effect snow. That gray line must be the temperature of the moist surface air as it rises, not sure exactly how that's calculated. Where it intersects with the profile of the surrounding air temperature, that's the spot it stops rising (EL).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Convec...tential_energy

Under example:

A good example of convective instability can be found in our own atmosphere. If dry mid-level air is drawn over very warm, moist air in the lower troposphere, a hydrolapse (an area of rapidly decreasing dew point temperatures with height) results in the region where the moist boundary layer and mid-level air meet. As daytime heating increases mixing within the moist boundary layer, some of the moist air will begin to interact with the dry mid-level air above it

dry midlevel air (from a cold continental air mass) over relatively warm moist air at the surface above a lake is the lake effect setup
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Old 01-10-2016, 06:00 PM
 
Location: Westminster/Huntington Beach, CA
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Cambium, I've always loved the knowledge you share on these forums. Have you studied meteorology professionally or are you just a die hard weather fan? You are very knowledgable and you explain things very well.

You should be teaching meteorology courses.
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Old 01-10-2016, 06:22 PM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
83,502 posts, read 75,252,292 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Well CAPE measures the potential energy of a parcel... how much and how fast it will rise from convection. More moist air rising fast over a lake means more lake effects snow. High convection also means more likely for thunderstorms. EL is the equilibrium, level at which the moist lake air parcel is no longer buoyant... highest elevation of convection. So I would think higher EL = air rises higher = more convection, more potential for lake effect snow. That gray line must be the temperature of the moist surface air as it rises, not sure exactly how that's calculated. Where it intersects with the profile of the surrounding air temperature, that's the spot it stops rising (EL).
Thanks! I knew a little about CAPE but not EL and thanks for relating it to the sounding. Good stuff.

Quote:
Originally Posted by NativeOrange View Post
Cambium, I've always loved the knowledge you share on these forums. Have you studied meteorology professionally or are you just a die hard weather fan? You are very knowledgable and you explain things very well.

You should be teaching meteorology courses.
Wow. Thanks so much but I feel like I know nothing or just the basics and wouldn't be able to explain it. Just a hobby and passion thats all. Since I was 7yrs old and that was a long time ago. Lol
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Old 01-10-2016, 08:29 PM
 
Location: Westminster/Huntington Beach, CA
1,780 posts, read 1,759,778 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cambium View Post
Wow. Thanks so much but I feel like I know nothing or just the basics and wouldn't be able to explain it. Just a hobby and passion thats all. Since I was 7yrs old and that was a long time ago. Lol
Eh. Now you're just being modest. Lol.
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Old 01-16-2016, 07:35 AM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
83,502 posts, read 75,252,292 times
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Here's that Dual Poll Radar I talked about...


A new state of the art radar that can detect what's rain/snow/ice better.


It uses vertical and horizontal viewing of the atmosphere and detects if the object (rain drop or snowflake) is big or small or long or round, ect. Much more asccurate in determining whats frozen or not.


Ground reports are always the best but this Dual Poll is better than traditional radars.


https://twitter.com/EdValleeWx/statu...609408/photo/1







Here's another


"Colder air changing sleet to snow. Notice how pink area is shrinking from last hour. "


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Old 04-08-2016, 10:42 AM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
83,502 posts, read 75,252,292 times
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There were reports of hail and sleet around the area.... An interesting debate on that on twitter..... Posting a tweet conversation between a few guys.. 4 are meteos (Ryan, Steve, Matt & Racheal).

So its not sleet as I originally thought, didn't realize there was no warm layer aloft to melt the precip then refreeze it! I say its Graupel though not hail.

Quote:
Ben: brief hail in Brooklyn, ny

Steve: Sleet

Ben: almost positive it was hail. Was small but still larger than sleet

Steve: almost positive it was hail. Was small but still larger than sleet

Ryan: It's hail... not sleet. There's no >0c warm layer. A bit of elevated CAPE, dry boundary layer, and low wbz.

Bill: Agreed, saw it myself. Not a sleet environment. It was 44° at the surface too

Steve: It is sleet

Ryan: Yeah... no. Here's the HRRR sounding from LGA. That ain't sleet bro.




Bill: I saw the clouds too! Very convective and dark. It was hail. Again, I saw it with my own eyes. Very soft hail

Steve: This is the first time I have heard hail being described as soft. Lol

Bill: How would describe hail that doesn't "ping" but "smushes" on impact? "Soft hail"

Bobby: graupel

Bill: I thought graupel too. Rimed over hail. I know what it wasn't....snow

Matt: lol at people arguing sleet vs. hail in the Northeast today. This is the furthest thing from a sleet sounding ever.



Rachael: Bahaha!! Just read through everything. Thanks for the entertainment. Team @ryanhanrahan always.

Mike: Ice pellets, graupel, soft hail all fit much better than sleet.

Matt: Yes. Graupel is happening also.

Chris: Video: Nice hail 1024am Milford Ct
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Old 01-04-2017, 02:49 PM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
83,502 posts, read 75,252,292 times
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Back and forth between meteorologist Bernie Rayno and Sam Lillo. On phone so just copying and pasting. Interesting discussion..

https://twitter.com/splillo/status/8...720960/photo/1

From Bernie: I think that is the absolute wrong way of looking at things. the weather works from top to bottom not bottom to top.

From Bernie: yes but the key is the strength and movement of the southern system in relation to the stearing UL moving across lakes.

From Sam: Actually baroclinic Rossby theory says exactly the opposite....But hopefully we all know that it's a two-way street

@splillo . to me Sam, it's the strength & positioning of southern short rounding the steering trof. tronger shortwave more precip of nw side

@AccuRayno sure, but what influences its strength & position? Sfc baroclinic zone, temp advection, and column diabatic heating

@splillo , sure but what produces the upward motion and the precipitation is energy aloft which also controls the steering flow...

@AccuRayno what produces the "energy" aloft? Incipient circulation on sfc baroclinic zone.
It's a feedback, and I can go all day...

@splillo ...what produces the circulation, it is the energy aloft. we are going in circles my friend....anyway hope to meet you someday....

@AccuRayno exactly, it's a feedback process. Top, middle, and bottom all interact. Not just in one direction.

Then Anthony steps in guess he agrees with Sam and says meteos need to change their thinking?

@splillo pretty ridiculous tweet you quoted. I sure hope that we are taking it out of context because wow.

@antmasiello unfortunately don't think so.
Also unfortunately, pretty sure a lot of people think this way.

@splillo how to save this field? It's simple: get the ignorant out and put the onus back on forecasters instead of models.
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Old 02-28-2017, 05:11 AM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
83,502 posts, read 75,252,292 times
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From Texas. Balloon launch this morning shows a "cap" in the atmosphere. That will not allow thunderstorms to form. If or once the cap breaks, then things can happen fast under right circumstances.


Think of a "cap" like putting a lid on top of boiling water. Heat and the air inside the pot cant escape or rise up, it's capped. Same with the atmosphere. It suppresses the development of thunderstorms.

The red line going right like that indicates rapid warming aloft. Looks like between 3000-5000 feet.

https://twitter.com/NWSFortWorth/sta...43309745094657
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