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Old 12-30-2012, 09:30 PM
 
168 posts, read 238,543 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by P London View Post
London isn't really cool summer, i'd say warm summer just about anyway. London regulary goes up to 25C and thats not cool - no sea breeze to temper anything also
Why do you make seem London a warm place?

Compared to New York, it's way too chilly. Come to New York during summertime and you will know what "warm" is. London's summer are more like May or September in NY.
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Old 12-31-2012, 04:12 AM
 
Location: London, UK
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JuliganO View Post
Why do you make seem London a warm place?

Compared to New York, it's way too chilly. Come to New York during summertime and you will know what "warm" is. London's summer are more like May or September in NY.
I said just about warm.
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Old 12-31-2012, 04:34 AM
 
Location: Leeds, UK
22,256 posts, read 29,057,570 times
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It's subjective. To me, 23C is warm, and London rarely has highs under 20C in July, in an average summer, that is. Even during cooler summer months, highs under 20C are not commonplace.

The most 'average' summer month I could find was August 2002, which had 3 days with a high below 20C, compared to 8 days with highs above 25C.

I'd consider New York hot in the summer, as opposed to warm, but when classifying climates, we need to do it in a global sense. I might consider London warm, but there are plenty of places warmer than London in the summer, likewise there are plenty of places hotter than New York in the summer, so in a global sense, London isn't particularly warm in the summer, nor is New York particularly hot.

Last edited by dunno what to put here; 12-31-2012 at 04:48 AM..
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Old 12-31-2012, 05:14 AM
 
Location: Laurentia
5,593 posts, read 7,844,434 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JuliganO View Post
Why do you make seem London a warm place?

Compared to New York, it's way too chilly. Come to New York during summertime and you will know what "warm" is. London's summer are more like May or September in NY.
First off, NYC in the summer is hot, not warm . Secondly, May and September in NYC are generally considered to feature warm weather (and I agree with that), and London's summers feature warm weather, albeit falling short of American standards of summer. Thirdly, winters in London are warmer than NYC's winters. London averages 47/37F, and NYC averages 39/27F. Both of them are really mild by my standards, but in any case it's clear which one is milder. On the other hand, London is much less prone to warm waves than NYC. NYC's winter record high is 75F, whereas London's is 67F. The difference in record lows is not significant.
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Old 12-31-2012, 05:40 AM
 
Location: London, UK
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I consider NYC's summers as very warm/Hot, London's summers I consider warm places like Aberdeen I consider cool summers. And also people have different definitions of what is cold/hot/cool/warm. Someone from the Australian Outback would consider NYC summers has only slightly warm but somone from Subarctic island may consider NYC's summers as desert like hot........
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Old 12-31-2012, 07:10 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
26,287 posts, read 36,656,289 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JuliganO View Post
I would consider Toronto a warm temperate climate, but not subtropical.
Warm temperate to me is like Cincinnati, Ohio, North Carolina, Virginia or the non-mountainous areas of south-central France.

Toronto is probably best described as mild or moderate continental.

Last edited by Acajack; 12-31-2012 at 07:43 AM..
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Old 12-31-2012, 05:10 PM
 
Location: Laurentia
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Obviously for each of us "warm temperate" conjures up differing images. Toronto's climate looks like garden-variety humid continental to me. It has real summers and winters, but neither of them are particularly hot or cold.
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Old 12-31-2012, 06:11 PM
 
Location: Columbus, Ohio
1,707 posts, read 3,145,265 times
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Ha, subtropical and warm temperate are one in the same for me. Semantics schematics.
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Old 12-31-2012, 11:06 PM
 
641 posts, read 1,007,294 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Patricius Maximus View Post
Obviously for each of us "warm temperate" conjures up differing images. Toronto's climate looks like garden-variety humid continental to me. It has real summers and winters, but neither of them are particularly hot or cold.
Sounds about right, real winters but not too cold and real summers but not too hot.
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Old 01-01-2013, 01:45 PM
 
Location: Niagara Falls, ON
1,222 posts, read 1,363,514 times
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I like how koppen words it "Hot Summer Continental"

Quote:
Originally Posted by yowps3 View Post
I'm sure in the past 100 years we've had a Feburary that was colder than Janurary..

Besides Toronto is close in proximity to massive bodies of water, which can quickly alter the conditions..

Case in point is that Toronto's climate is generally almost the same the past 100yrs
I am missing your point.. This thread is about if certain cities in southern Ontario may eventually become Humid Subtropical. You posted a picture of a 7 day forecast in Toronto - It takes years of data to determine if a climate is changing.

And yes, certain February's have been colder than January's in the same year.
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