U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Weather
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
 
Old 12-20-2012, 07:57 PM
 
Location: In transition
10,669 posts, read 14,202,982 times
Reputation: 5081

Advertisements

I've been hearing a lot in the news here about the warmest weather for 2012 here in Canada for many decades.. and I personally believe it's a trend to warmer weather.
I checked out the winter averages for some places in Southern Ontario and it seems that with winters losing their snowpack and a trend towards much milder temperatures... it seems some parts of Southern Ontario are gradually becoming humid subtropical over time.

Check out these stations for January 2012 - the averages look much closer to what you might see in NYC or Boston on average vs. the averages for Southern Ontario

Windsor, ON

Daily Data | Canada's National Climate Archive


Toronto Airport, ON

Daily Data | Canada's National Climate Archive


Downtown Toronto, ON

Daily Data | Canada's National Climate Archive


What are your thoughts?
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-20-2012, 08:02 PM
 
Location: Leeds, UK
22,256 posts, read 26,576,163 times
Reputation: 8760
Well Toronto and Windsor are still quite a bit colder than both New York and Boston - if the climate continues to warm up though, then no doubt they will eventually find themselves under the Koppen subtropical classification. Do they not have 1981 - 2010 averages in Canada yet?
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-20-2012, 09:26 PM
 
641 posts, read 918,884 times
Reputation: 520
Quote:
Originally Posted by dunno what to put here View Post
Well Toronto and Windsor are still quite a bit colder than both New York and Boston - if the climate continues to warm up though, then no doubt they will eventually find themselves under the Koppen subtropical classification. Do they not have 1981 - 2010 averages in Canada yet?
New York warmer but Boston...

Boston avg january high is 2.4c and avg january low is -5.4c

Last january 2012 downtown Toronto avg high was 2.6c and avg low -3.8c
Slightly warmer than Boston avg january, as winter 2012 was very mild and
it seems like there is trend towards milder winters lately.
This december has been very mild....almost Vancouver-like

New York january avg high is 3.9c and low -2.8c

I too am wondering when Canadian 1981-2010 averages will be available.... 2020?
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-20-2012, 09:37 PM
 
Location: Columbus, Ohio
1,709 posts, read 2,906,001 times
Reputation: 1213
Here's a website that has produced climate maps based on simulated warming conditions: World Maps of Köppen-Geiger climate classification

The humid subtropical (-3C isotherm I assume) makes its way to the southern tip of Ontario in all 2001-25 scenarios.

On another note, have you been avoiding all the climate change threads? I've been complaining quite a bit over the past year about warm the past winter, spring, and summer were.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-20-2012, 09:41 PM
 
Location: Beautiful Niagara Falls ON.
10,018 posts, read 11,584,855 times
Reputation: 8976
I don't know...... I just got in from walking my dogs and I froze my butt off out there. A touch warmer? For sure. Subtropical? I don't think so. LOL
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-20-2012, 10:08 PM
 
Location: In transition
10,669 posts, read 14,202,982 times
Reputation: 5081
Quote:
Originally Posted by burloak View Post
New York warmer but Boston...

Boston avg january high is 2.4c and avg january low is -5.4c

Last january 2012 downtown Toronto avg high was 2.6c and avg low -3.8c
Slightly warmer than Boston avg january, as winter 2012 was very mild and
it seems like there is trend towards milder winters lately.
This december has been very mild....almost Vancouver-like

New York january avg high is 3.9c and low -2.8c

I too am wondering when Canadian 1981-2010 averages will be available.... 2020?
Yes I've been noticing that Toronto generally doesn't have a snowpack most winters anymore... it is becoming more Vancouver like which is why I'm wondering if it's becoming more like a humid subtropical climate than a typical continental one.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-20-2012, 10:09 PM
 
Location: In transition
10,669 posts, read 14,202,982 times
Reputation: 5081
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nivalis View Post
Here's a website that has produced climate maps based on simulated warming conditions: World Maps of Köppen-Geiger climate classification

The humid subtropical (-3C isotherm I assume) makes its way to the southern tip of Ontario in all 2001-25 scenarios.

On another note, have you been avoiding all the climate change threads? I've been complaining quite a bit over the past year about warm the past winter, spring, and summer were.
Cool.. that looks like by 2100, the great lakes area including Southern Ontario will definitely be Cfa.. which is bad news for cold and snow lovers like you

I generally avoid the climate change threads as they tend to get very heated.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-20-2012, 10:17 PM
 
Location: Leeds, UK
22,256 posts, read 26,576,163 times
Reputation: 8760
If the forecasts come to fruition, earth will become increasingly hostile for lovers of cold and snow - die hard cold lovers (those who love cold and snow so much they will go anywhere to find it) will have no choice but to flee to high-latitude areas in Canada, as warm temperate is forecast to engulf most of Scandinavia, and personally, I have no desire to live in some ugly, isolated ex-mining town in North West Territories.

Luckily, that's quite a way off, I may even be dead before then.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-21-2012, 04:10 AM
 
Location: Laurentia
5,593 posts, read 7,169,494 times
Reputation: 2425
This will certainly become a global warming slugfest over time, so the global warming people will say that it's becoming more humid subtropical, and the cooling people will say it's becoming more subarctic. So I'll say right here that it is a fact that the world warmed from the 1980's to the 2000's, but I believe that cycle is coming to an end, and it will take global warming fears with it. The previous warming is detectable and noticeable, but a degree or two isn't that significant. Toronto and the rest of Canada have gotten cold and snowy winters in recent times, and barring a huge warming (which I don't think will happen) they will still be present. Small climate changes mean that there are noticeable changes, but basically the climate is still the same.

Warm winters occur from time to time in Toronto, and since Toronto averages -4C in January, it isn't that far from the outer limit of humid subtropical climate to begin with. If you get a winter that averages 2C above normal, the humid subtropical threshold will be breached and a snowpack will be difficult to retain, especially in a dry winter.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dunno what to put here View Post
If the forecasts come to fruition, earth will become increasingly hostile for lovers of cold and snow - die hard cold lovers (those who love cold and snow so much they will go anywhere to find it) will have no choice but to flee to high-latitude areas in Canada, as warm temperate is forecast to engulf most of Scandinavia, and personally, I have no desire to live in some ugly, isolated ex-mining town in North West Territories.

Luckily, that's quite a way off, I may even be dead before then.
If those horrific forecasts come to fruition, it's possible that that ex-mining town's population will go way up and more amenities will appear, like an inverse of what happened in the Deep South in the late 20th century. As a cold lover, however, I'll say that the Earth is unbalanced towards warm climates enough as it is, and if any change is needed in climate it's colder, not warmer; a glacial period climate provides a good balance (notwithstanding the socioeconomic impact).

By 2100 who knows what could happen? There will probably be a plethora of habitable exoplanets catalogued, and colonization is conceivable. If a habitable planet exists around Tau Ceti, the trip time would be a feasible 20 years (50% of light speed), and in the case of Tau Ceti f it would likely be quite a bit colder than the Earth. The same goes for Gliese 581 d. There is also the matter of terraforming Mars, which might also be a hospitable place for cold lovers. All of this is very speculative, but how can you avoid speculation when you're talking 90 years into the future?
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-21-2012, 05:52 AM
 
Location: Melbourne Australia
777 posts, read 944,494 times
Reputation: 588
No.

If we start calling places in Canada subtropical, then we may as well re-classify Melbourne as Equatorial while we are at it.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:
Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Weather

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2021, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top