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Old 01-30-2013, 04:16 AM
 
Location: White House, TN
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This question pertains to humid continental climates with a reliable winter snowpack (e.g. northern New England, Michigan, Minnesota, much of Canada, etc). Some time before the snowpack settles in, all of the leaves on the trees are dead or have fallen.

In a hypothetical scenario, let's say the last leaves die off November 10th, but the first snow that will stick until the spring doesn't fall until December 1st. I'm wondering about the season between November 10th - November 30th. Would it still be fall, would it be early winter, or a creative name (e.g. 'the skin of winter')?
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Old 01-30-2013, 04:59 AM
 
Location: Laurentia
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I call it late autumn, and although you could call it early winter, I've always felt that it's closer related to autumn than to winter.
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Old 01-30-2013, 08:32 AM
 
Location: London, UK
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Autumn because the normal winter regime (for those snowy climates) hasn't yet arrived.
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Old 01-30-2013, 12:37 PM
 
Location: North West Northern Ireland.
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That would be Autumn.
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Old 01-30-2013, 12:48 PM
 
Location: Top of the South, NZ
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The lifeless looking time. I don't mind a few deciduous trees, but a whole forest of them during winter looks a bit depressing imho.
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Old 01-30-2013, 12:53 PM
 
Location: Yorkshire, England
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Perhaps Ariete could confirm this but I believe the Finnish word for November also translates as 'the dead month', which probably sounds realistic.
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Old 01-30-2013, 12:55 PM
 
Location: London, UK
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Then avoid forests in most of the temperate zone in the Northern hemisphere.
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Old 01-30-2013, 01:09 PM
 
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Late fall. We don't have a specific word for it in Spanish, either
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Old 01-30-2013, 01:31 PM
 
Location: Vermont
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Late fall, although I've heard people refer to it as "stick season".
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Old 01-30-2013, 02:18 PM
 
Location: Finland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ben86 View Post
Perhaps Ariete could confirm this but I believe the Finnish word for November also translates as 'the dead month', which probably sounds realistic.
Literally something like that, yes. Practically it means the arrival of frost and more like the 'dying month'. The basis for the Finnish word (marras) is the same ancient Indian word which in French, Spanish, Latin and so on is the basis for the word death.

The month itself is a bit bipolar. In the beginning of November there's still some leaves on the trees and it's warm enough for grass etc to grow, while in the end of the month it's practically already winter.

We don't have a name for this 'season', it's such a short period, just a few weeks. Meteorologically the winter starts officially when the daily mean temperature is below freezing for at least 7 days in a row. Here winter starts usually around Nov 25th (last year 29th), in Northern Lapland already in mid-October.
Snow is not required for it to be winter, the precipitation may as well come as rain. Usually the permanent snow cover starts to form around Christmas, but early December is nevertheless winter.
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