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Old 03-13-2013, 07:17 AM
 
Location: Leeds, UK
22,256 posts, read 26,565,297 times
Reputation: 8760

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It's 'official'.

Like curly fries? You
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Old 03-13-2013, 08:33 AM
 
Location: Melbourne Australia
777 posts, read 944,082 times
Reputation: 588
I enjoy thunderstorms.

Therefore I am highly intelligent, but I knew that already
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Old 03-13-2013, 10:13 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia
5,302 posts, read 9,092,780 times
Reputation: 2136
I love thunderstorms. Can't wait to be in FL this summer!
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Old 03-13-2013, 11:52 AM
 
3,491 posts, read 5,530,669 times
Reputation: 5410
Excellent article. Shared it to facebook. I hope we find true correlation and not a data-mining error from the volume of potential things to like which even in a random sample of 58,000 would produce irrelevant results.

They said they had an 88% success rate on predicting sexuality. I'd really like to know more about that. If they were able to figure out who all the gay men in the study were, and then use their program to select 88% of those men, that would be impressive. If they were looking at all men, simply choosing straight every time would result in a success rate higher than 88%. --I don't need to know who is gay, but if a computer can figure it out when the individual desires to hide it, then it can probably figure out several other things that people wish to hide.

All around, I love this type of research.
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Old 03-13-2013, 02:07 PM
 
Location: New York
11,340 posts, read 18,637,671 times
Reputation: 6164
I love thunderstorms, and curly fries.
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Old 03-13-2013, 02:15 PM
 
Location: Finland
24,257 posts, read 21,640,237 times
Reputation: 11103
What the hell are curly fries? Well, obviously fries that are curly. I like thunderstorms and don't like fries at all, so I'm probably super hyper intelligent.
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Old 03-13-2013, 06:44 PM
 
Location: Laurentia
5,593 posts, read 7,166,472 times
Reputation: 2425
I think the correlation between intelligence and liking thunderstorms is too slight to be useful in a practical sense, if it even exists at all. There is definitely something to be said for appreciating the awesome power of nature, no matter whether you personally like thunderstorms or not.

I for one really like thunderstorms, as long as they are not devastating. I don't like really hot and humid conditions that thunderstorms often develop in, but just because I hate heat doesn't mean I hate thunderstorms. If it has to be hot and humid I actually welcome thunderstorms, as they provide a distraction from the oppressive conditions. I myself strongly prefer cool weather thunderstorms - an ideal scenario in my opinion would be a very mild derecho or gust front with a well-defined wall cloud coming in when it's 50F. I'm also a big fan of thundersnow, as you might imagine. For someone who likes snow and blizzards as well as thunderstorms, a combination of the two would have to be great.
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Old 03-13-2013, 07:19 PM
 
Location: South Jersey
13,869 posts, read 8,163,133 times
Reputation: 5031
I hate thunderstorms. Always have. It's worth noting, though, that the study doesn't imply this correlates with lack of intelligence, just that liking thunderstorms correlates with intelligence, for whatever reason.
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Old 03-13-2013, 07:22 PM
 
Location: Buxton, England
7,023 posts, read 10,071,709 times
Reputation: 3628
Thunderstorms are great. I like a thunderstorm. In the UK they are more unpredictable than anywhere else (and of course rare). We had no thunderstorms at all last summer despite plenty of days when there were "favourable" conditions of humidity and instability. But then, end of January, a massive loud thunder and hailstorm shook the bleedin' house like a bat out of hell from nowhere. Middle of winter. Storms don't follow the rules over here. All the best I've seen were not forecast and happened at unexpected times.
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Old 03-13-2013, 10:25 PM
 
Location: New York City
2,789 posts, read 5,872,506 times
Reputation: 1847
Quote:
Originally Posted by Infamous92 View Post
I love thunderstorms, and curly fries.
Ditto
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