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Old 03-17-2013, 06:05 PM
 
Location: London, UK
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Just wondering because it seems especially the further south you go along the east coast summer precipitation is high...

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So does Eastern North America ''officially'' have a monsoon season?
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Old 03-17-2013, 06:17 PM
 
Location: North West Northern Ireland.
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No they just have loads of thunderstorms practically every single day for the whole summer.
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Old 03-17-2013, 06:43 PM
 
Location: Vancouver, Canada
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Quote:
Originally Posted by owenc View Post
No they just have loads of thunderstorms practically every single day for the whole summer.
not everyday, more like 50% of summer days, u can see average rainy days range 10-15 depending on city in july-aug
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Old 03-17-2013, 07:32 PM
 
Location: Eastern NC
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No real monsoon because it can rain anytime of the year.
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Old 03-17-2013, 08:16 PM
 
Location: Laurentia
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Summer isn't that much rainier than winter in the eastern U.S., and the vast majority of the eastern U.S. falls well short of Koeppen's monsoonal climate thresholds; the driest winter month has to have less than 1/10 the precip of the wettest summer month. The same can also be said for almost any other climate classification system. At any rate there is no distinct dry and rainy season in those places that you mention.
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Old 03-17-2013, 08:51 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
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Most places are natually wetter in summer because it's more humid and warmer. Most of the rain we get is due to thunderstorms generated by hot and humid weather. That's not really possible in winter because of the dryness and cooler temperatures. So of course it'll be wetter in summer. It's not due to a monsoon though.
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