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Old 08-05-2013, 10:46 PM
 
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At what temperature are you equally comfortable wearing short sleeves in both direct sun and under the shade for reasonable periods of time? We all seek sun if we're feeling cold and seek shade when we're feeling hot. What temperature range is that sweet spot where you can hang out in both situations in short sleeves? Let's say at a company picnic, BBQ, outdoor concert, or ceremony.
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Old 08-05-2013, 10:50 PM
 
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For me, that range is 68 F to 74 F as I think it is for most people but I want to hear from the hardcore heat lovers and cold lovers. 60-68 F, I can wear short sleeves in the direct sun and anything above 75 F, I actively seek shade unless I'm in the pool or have just gotten out of one.

Last edited by AdriannaSmiling; 08-05-2013 at 11:02 PM..
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Old 08-05-2013, 10:50 PM
 
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That is a loaded question for people like me living in continental climates. I find that my body adapts. What feels cold/warm to me in the spring does not feel the same to me in fall.

For example, when my body is at its peak of cold acclimation (February):
I would be comfortable in sun at 0 C
In shade at 10 C
(Assuming there is no wind in either case)

In July/August, when my body is heat-acclimated:

Comfortable in sun at 15 C
In shade at 22 C

EDIT: Sorry, I misread your question. Well, my respective answers for winter and summer would be around 5 C and 18 C, to be reasonably comfy in both sun and shade.
To make things even more complicated, add 5 degrees if I'm sleepy or tired. Subtract 5 degrees if I've been working out.
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Old 08-05-2013, 10:53 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arctic_gardener View Post
That is a loaded question for people like me living in continental climates. I find that my body adapts. What feels cold/warm to me in the spring does not feel the same to me in fall.

For example, when my body is at its peak of cold acclimation (February):
I would be comfortable in sun at 0 C
In shade at 10 C
(Assuming there is no wind in either case)

In July/August, when my body is heat-acclimated:

Comfortable in sun at 15 C
In shade at 22 C

EDIT: Sorry, I misread your question. Well, my respective answers for winter and summer would be around 5 C and 18 C, to be reasonably comfy in both sun and shade.
0C-10 C (yes, I know that's 32-50F) in SHORT SLEEVES? That would be comfortable for me to spend the day outside at an outdoor event but I'd want to be wearing a jacket and would probably keep my hands in the pockets in that lower range unless I also had gloves.
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Old 08-05-2013, 10:54 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AdriannaSmiling View Post
At what temperature are you equally comfortable wearing short sleeves in both direct sun and under the shade for reasonable periods of time? We all seek sun if we're feeling cold and seek shade when we're feeling hot. What temperature range is that sweet spot where you can hang out in both situations in short sleeves? Let's say at a company picnic, BBQ, outdoor concert, or ceremony.

Currently it is right around 65 degrees that I am fine wearing short sleeves, it used to be about 90 degrees when I was comfortable wearing short sleeves then menopause hit........LOL
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Old 08-05-2013, 10:56 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AdriannaSmiling View Post
0C-10 C (yes, I know that's 32-50F) in SHORT SLEEVES? That would be comfortable for me to spend the day outside at an outdoor event but I'd want to be wearing a jacket and would probably keep my hands in the pockets in that lower range unless I also had gloves.
After you go through a Saskatchewan winter, you too will find 32 F balmy, or even warm Trust me.
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Old 08-05-2013, 10:57 PM
 
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For me that temperature is about 75F year round.
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Old 08-05-2013, 10:59 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arctic_gardener View Post
After you go through a Saskatchewan winter, you too will find 32 F balmy, or even warm Trust me.

That's like the coldest night of the year for us and the day warms up to like 50F/10C after that morning frost melts around 10AM. The coldest I've felt was 15 F or -10 C (both in Lake Tahoe and NYC in winter) and I was outside for the entire day but wearing four layers, gloves, and boots. Quite comfortable when dressed warm but I can't imagine wearing a t-shirt at that temperature. I'd like to experience a bitter cold of -40 just once to see what it feels like, though.
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Old 08-05-2013, 11:03 PM
 
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The only saving grace here is that it's a dry cold, so your clothes don't get all damp and clammy. Also, in late winter and early spring, the sun reflects off of the snow and makes it feel warmer than it is, even in shade.
I once visited Victoria, BC in early winter. The temperature out there was 50 F. We signed up for a whalewatching trip lasting four hours, and the tour guide was very insistent I wear three layers of clothing, toque, mittens and rainjacket, because it was windy and cold out on the ocean. I said I'd be fine with just one layer plus the rainjacket. He thought I was just being a braggart, but I actually was very comfortable the whole time. If I did that at this time of year, I'd be shivering.
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Old 08-05-2013, 11:16 PM
 
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25/26c
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