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Old 02-16-2014, 04:27 PM
 
Location: A subtropical paradise
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alex985 View Post
It is normal for Tallahassee, it happens every single year. And obviously warmth dominates It's at 30 N at low elevation for crying out loud , but radical changes happen every year.
While Tallahassee, and the rest of the Coastal Deep South can see swings in a normal winter, the occurrences wont be as much, and the change would be minimal enough to be within the range of stability.


Quote:
Originally Posted by alex985 View Post
Aren't you the same idiot that proposed that idea of building a barrier across the U.S to stop cold snaps from coming down, and now you're arguing that the SE is stable? Which one is it?
How ironic that you call me an idiot when you completely missed the fact that the barrier construction thread was obviously satirical, created specifically to make fun of how people over-exaggerate about the weather of the US East of the Rockies. The only place in that part of the country that has a right to complain about the weather is people from the Midwest/Great Plains, and even they take it well. Really, the Northeast is pretty moderated in the winter, as the Appalachians slow down arctic air from the center of the country, yet people constantly whine, and make it seem horrible. The only part of the South that is cold during winter is the Appalachian/Inland South, cities like Atlanta, Nashville, Dallas, etc. The Coastal South adjacent to the Gulf/South Atlantic doesn't have four seasons, spared from the cold much of the time, and by the time arctic fronts reach the area, they are nothing more than cool refreshing breezes.
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Old 02-16-2014, 06:37 PM
 
Location: Lexington, KY
12,283 posts, read 7,916,041 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alex985 View Post
Again, more talking out of your ass. If there's anything the South is known for it's erratic winters where it can be 70 F one day and 35 F the next. If you really believe the South is "stable" in the winter then you're a fool.
Alex you have to remember...no matter what facts you provide, Yn0hTnA by default knows more about where you live than you do.
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Old 02-16-2014, 08:22 PM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
12,461 posts, read 11,475,356 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yn0hTnA View Post
Yeah, that is one thing about the US (East of the Rockies) I dislike; the only lands there that have winter stability are the inland portions of Central/South Texas ( Austin, San Antonio, Laredo, etc), the Texas Coast and barrier islands (Houston/Galveston, Corpus Christi,etc), Lousiana Coast and Delta ( New Orleans metro), extreme coastal Mississippi, and Alabama, the entire state of Florida, and Georgia, South Carolina, and North Carolina east of the Appalachians( Brunswick, Savannah, Charleston, Myrtle Beach, Cape Hattaras).

None of those areas you mentioned have winter temp stability. Would you please quit just posting falsehoods and back it up with climate data.

San Antonio for instance has a standard deviation of 11F on the Jan daily high temp, and a std deviation of 10F on the low temp. Mobile, AL has 10F on the high and 12F on the low. Pretty much the same as everywhere east of the Rockies like Philly. Please use data and backup your exaggerated claims about how "subtropical" and "stable" the South is. In summer, the std deviations are half that. That is stable in summer, not winter.

The only somewhat stable winter in the east is deep S. Florida. Miami has 6F on the max, and 9F on the min.

I'll bet that Asia, Australia, S. America, and Europe all have lower standard deviation of temps on their winter climate.
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Old 02-16-2014, 08:29 PM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yn0hTnA View Post
The places I mentioned are the portions of the South that do exhibit winter stability. A few odd days of deviation doesn't take away from the many days in a row of stability those areas of the South can get. People on this forum like to exaggerate the supposed "bipolarness" of the South's winters. In reality, it isn't all that drastic, and such deviations occur only a handful of times.

Back up your claim with data. Would you please check standard deviation numbers from NOAA. Myrtle Beach std deviation in winter is no different than places well inland. Montgomery, AL is 11F on the high and 11F on the low in winter (std deviation). Myrtle Beach std deviation is around 10F on the high and 11F on the low. Not particularly stable when compared to summer.
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Old 02-16-2014, 08:41 PM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
12,461 posts, read 11,475,356 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alex985 View Post
It is normal for Tallahassee, it happens every single year. And obviously warmth dominates It's at 30 N at low elevation for crying out loud , but radical changes happen every year.

Aren't you the same idiot that proposed that idea of building a barrier across the U.S to stop cold snaps from coming down, and now you're arguing that the SE is stable? Which one is it?

Exactly he is the one. He knows quite well how unstable the winters here are. This is all just wishful thinking on his part. He never ever posts climate data to backup his off the wall statements.

Winter in the SE USA = most certainly not stable, and quite schizophrenic.

Here is Charleston from a winter that was very close to normal. In the course of an "average" temp month, temps went ranged from 48F to 75F over the course of 28 days.

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Old 02-16-2014, 08:46 PM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
12,461 posts, read 11,475,356 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yn0hTnA View Post
While Tallahassee, and the rest of the Coastal Deep South can see swings in a normal winter, the occurrences wont be as much, and the change would be minimal enough to be within the range of stability.




How ironic that you call me an idiot when you completely missed the fact that the barrier construction thread was obviously satirical, created specifically to make fun of how people over-exaggerate about the weather of the US East of the Rockies. The only place in that part of the country that has a right to complain about the weather is people from the Midwest/Great Plains, and even they take it well. Really, the Northeast is pretty moderated in the winter, as the Appalachians slow down arctic air from the center of the country, yet people constantly whine, and make it seem horrible. The only part of the South that is cold during winter is the Appalachian/Inland South, cities like Atlanta, Nashville, Dallas, etc. The Coastal South adjacent to the Gulf/South Atlantic doesn't have four seasons, spared from the cold much of the time, and by the time arctic fronts reach the area, they are nothing more than cool refreshing breezes.

Lol, you should just be laughed off this forum. You consider high temps in the 30's and 40'sF to be cool refreshing breezes? Guess what? Savannah, GA averages 11 days each winter with a max temp less than 50F. So I guess they get almost two weeks every year of "cool refreshing breezes" of 40f something. What a joke.
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Old 02-16-2014, 09:06 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Western Massachusetts
46,078 posts, read 45,777,819 times
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Please return to the thread topic
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Old 02-17-2014, 03:07 AM
 
Location: A subtropical paradise
2,069 posts, read 2,431,904 times
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The US South is warm, subtropical, and stable for the most part during winter. Just because it deviates a handful of days doesn't take away from the overall stability I see.

Anyways, East Coasters like Tom77Falcon's like to whine about absolutely nothing, when they have it made compared to other parts of the world; the US is a country with a HUGE diversity in climates; you can be in the drizzly Pacific Northwest, or the sunny Mediterranean SoCal; the hot, dry, and sunny Southwest, or the steamy subtropical deep south. Many choices to appeal to a wide range of people.
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Old 01-31-2015, 10:01 AM
 
100 posts, read 104,235 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gordo View Post
When I think of luckiest climates I think of that which have both cold climates and warm climates even thought for myself I don't like snow.

Number one has to be the US. The only thing lacking is abundance of "very warm winter" climates but there's still California. Besides the States I can think of 4 other posiblities.

Chile - Has a huge range of climates due to the length of it. But yet seems lacking something.... For example no humid subtropical???

New Zealand - Also for a small country has a great range of climates. But there's a lack of snow most places, while the north just doesn't seem as "tropical" as it should be. Sun hours are a bit low to.

Italy - Great for snowy winters in the alps and the warmth of the south in the Medditterean. But like Chile it seems to be lacking something thought hard to say what maybe subtropical?

Japan - Great for snowy winters in the north and certain areas of the central parts. The south is subtropical and the islands to the south of the main islands are even more tropical like. The only negatives are the surprisely high amount of cloudiness and the lack of any medditterean climates which seemed to be one of the most desirable climates.
California, Arizona, New Mexico, a lot of the southwest, Hawaii, Texas, Louisiana, Alabama, Mississippi, Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, and Virginia all have areas that often have really warm winters. Really, almost the entirety of the Southeast has warm winters, all the way to southern Illinois and New Jersey, as many areas fall within either a Humid Subtropical, Subtropical Highland, or Subtropical Seasonal climate. A large portion of the US is actually pretty warm in winter, so much so that climatologists consider it a warm to hot climate country. It's warmer on average than China, and has a larger area of warm climates than it too, including some regions of subtropical/tropical rainforest and subtropical/tropical savanna, as well as a larger area and a wider array of tropical climates than you will find in China.
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Old 01-31-2015, 10:07 AM
 
100 posts, read 104,235 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
But with large swaths that are all the same version of continental.

Personally to me "lucky" would be the country with the most stable winter temps. And in that regard the US fails miserably.
No. The continental climate is found in a very small amount of places outside of the Upper-Midwest and Northern New England. The Subtropical and Desert climates make up a larger area. The US is not Russia, it's not the most continental country in the world. The USA is classified as a warm to hot climate country by climatologists
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