U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Weather
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 11-08-2013, 08:43 AM
 
Location: In transition
10,509 posts, read 12,947,672 times
Reputation: 4893

Advertisements

I think using average annual temp solves the oceanic/continental divide. If we use 10C annual average temp as the cut off between cold and warm temperate, then places like NYC and Vancouver are warm temperate (barely in Vancouver's case) and Toronto and Glasgow are cold temperate. Whether a place is continental or oceanic shouldn't matter as long as they meet the average annual temp thresholds IMO.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 11-08-2013, 08:48 AM
 
Location: Trondheim, Norway - 63 N
3,295 posts, read 1,993,981 times
Reputation: 1614
10C mean annual temperate is a possibility as dividing the two.
Where should the cutoff between the cool temperate (like Glasgow) and subarctic be drawn?
And shouldn't subarctic also be divided?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-08-2013, 09:57 AM
 
Location: Top of the South, NZ
18,050 posts, read 15,054,808 times
Reputation: 6019
Quote:
Originally Posted by deneb78 View Post
I think using average annual temp solves the oceanic/continental divide. If we use 10C annual average temp as the cut off between cold and warm temperate, then places like NYC and Vancouver are warm temperate (barely in Vancouver's case) and Toronto and Glasgow are cold temperate. Whether a place is continental or oceanic shouldn't matter as long as they meet the average annual temp thresholds IMO.
This wouldn't enable someone to draw as many conclusions about the respective climates though.

Toronto resembles the NYC climate much more than it does Glasgow's, and Vancouver is closer to Glasgow than NYC, but this system would disguise that fact.

The terms Oceanic cool/warm and Continental cool/warm would be far more useful.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-08-2013, 09:58 AM
 
Location: Rimini, Emilia-Romagna, Italy (44°0 N)
2,673 posts, read 2,576,373 times
Reputation: 1029
Cities in the 10-12°C range are cool temperate to me.
I cannot think to London, Bristol, Cologne, Frankfurt, Basel, Vienna, Bruxelles, Dublin, Bucharest, Boston, Seattle, Denver, Chicago, Detroit as "warm" temperate.

I would use 12°C as a threshold between cool and warm temperate, like the Holdridge diagram.
Holdridge life zones - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

6-12°C cool temperate
12-18°C warm temperate
18-24°C subtropical
>24°C tropical
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-08-2013, 10:00 AM
 
Location: Trondheim, Norway - 63 N
3,295 posts, read 1,993,981 times
Reputation: 1614
The oceanic - continental dimension is clearly relevant.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-08-2013, 10:02 AM
 
Location: In transition
10,509 posts, read 12,947,672 times
Reputation: 4893
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jakobsli View Post
10C mean annual temperate is a possibility as dividing the two.
Where should the cutoff between the cool temperate (like Glasgow) and subarctic be drawn?
And shouldn't subarctic also be divided?
Subarctic should only apply for places with mean annual temps below 0C and has at least one month with average greater than 10C. If the mean annual temp is greater than 0C but less than 10C it is cold temperate IMO.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-08-2013, 10:06 AM
 
Location: Trondheim, Norway - 63 N
3,295 posts, read 1,993,981 times
Reputation: 1614
Quote:
Originally Posted by mar89 View Post
Cities in the 10-12°C range are cool temperate to me.
I cannot think to London, Bristol, Cologne, Frankfurt, Basel, Vienna, Bruxelles, Dublin, Bucharest, Boston, Seattle, Denver, Chicago, Detroit as "warm" temperate.

I would use 12°C as a threshold between cool and warm temperate, like the Holdridge diagram.
Holdridge life zones - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

6-12°C cool temperate
12-18°C warm temperate
18-24°C subtropical
>24°C tropical
You then could add:

3 - 5C hemiboreal
0 - 3C boreal
-6 - 0C subarctic/subpolar /taiga (permafrost widespread)
below -6C: hypersubpolar/hypersubarctic /subarctic with very cold winters
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-08-2013, 10:07 AM
 
Location: Top of the South, NZ
18,050 posts, read 15,054,808 times
Reputation: 6019
Quote:
Originally Posted by Infamous92 View Post
Warm temperate = the warm season clearly dominates over the cool season.
Mild temperate = Warm temperate, but with a less potent warm season.
This wouldn't follow any logical order though. Melbourne for example, has a higher average temperature than NYC, but is only mild temperate. Your warm/mild distinction would give no indication as to who actually has the warmer climate.

Wouldn't it just be better to say hot summer or cool summer if you want to highlight the warm season?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-08-2013, 10:11 AM
 
Location: Finland
24,257 posts, read 20,159,134 times
Reputation: 11103
Quote:
Originally Posted by mar89 View Post
Cities in the 10-12°C range are cool temperate to me.
I cannot think to London, Bristol, Cologne, Frankfurt, Basel, Vienna, Bruxelles, Dublin, Bucharest, Boston, Seattle, Denver, Chicago, Detroit as "warm" temperate.

I would use 12°C as a threshold between cool and warm temperate, like the Holdridge diagram.
Holdridge life zones - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

6-12°C cool temperate
12-18°C warm temperate
18-24°C subtropical
>24°C tropical
Bucharest, Denver, and Chicago are very much warm temperate. All have 6-7 months with a mean temp above 10C, and very long growing seasons, with shoulder seasons completely around 5C means at a minimum. Just that you're scared to death of cold doesn't make them cold temperate.

Quote:
Originally Posted by deneb78 View Post
Subarctic should only apply for places with mean annual temps below 0C and has at least one month with average greater than 10C. If the mean annual temp is greater than 0C but less than 10C it is cold temperate IMO.
These kind of climates are clearly subarctic in every possible way. I couldn't keep them as cool temperate.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rovaniemi#Climate
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-08-2013, 10:23 AM
 
Location: Trondheim, Norway - 63 N
3,295 posts, read 1,993,981 times
Reputation: 1614
Annual mean 0.9C would make Rovaniemi's climate boreal in my categories.
I would then see how to add continentality - oceanic, these would depend on precipitation and pattern of precipitation.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Weather
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top