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Old 11-19-2013, 03:56 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by overdrive1979 View Post
I don't think summer in Eastern Europe are as sticky as Eastern US.
That's the thing. Eastern Europe has about half the precipitation that the eastern US has. The temperatures are similar to maybe upstate New York, Massachusetts, etc., but these states are very wet. Just like eastern Europe is significantly far into the continent, you need to find equivalent places deeper inside North America. Japan is the only country in the world that exactly matches the awful temperature/humidity combo of the eastern US to a T; because it is the only country in the eastern hemisphere that is in the "east coast" of Asia. The size of the Sea of Japan, the Japan Current, and its topography basically cancel out the effects of the Siberian High.
----

If New Zealand was closer to Australia, like half the distance, I would say then that NZ might become similar to the US east coast. But, it's too far away from Australia and so, it's climate is very oceanic as a result
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Old 11-19-2013, 04:01 PM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
I think the east coast of the U.S. from Virginia to Massachusetts has a pretty good balance of 4 seasons - roughly 3 months each of fall, winter, spring and summer. Moreover, they are distinct seasons - with leaves changing colors in the fall, snow and ice in the winter, colorful blossoms in the spring and hot and humid beach-like weather in the summer.

So, what other countries and places have a climate similar to this?

None. I don't think anywhere has the record lows and extremes we do for the latitude. East Asia would be similar, but it seems they don't have the extremes (winter minimums) we do.
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Old 11-19-2013, 04:06 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
None. I don't think anywhere has the record lows and extremes we do for the latitude. East Asia would be similar, but it seems they don't have the extremes (winter minimums) we do.
Read the last 2 pages if you haven't already. Japan comes 99% close to our climate. The other 1% that's left out is our infamously erratic temperature swings in winter. Just in the same week here in PA we had temps below freezing, up to the mid 60s, and down to below freezing in the span of roughly 10 days
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Old 11-19-2013, 04:32 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Western Massachusetts
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
None. I don't think anywhere has the record lows and extremes we do for the latitude. East Asia would be similar, but it seems they don't have the extremes (winter minimums) we do.
As unbrainwashed said, some of East Asia does. Similar extremes to coastal New England:

Aomori, Aomori - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

HYANNIS, MASSACHUSETTS - Climate Summary

In winter, record lows are a bit milder during the warm. The summer pressure systems perhaps block cooler weather? Looks rather variable:

Weather History for Aomori Airport, Japan | Weather Underground

59°F one day, barely passing freezing the next.

People claim on the forum many times that North America is very variable compared to East Asia. I made a thread for more evidence on that, I think the difference is smaller than people make it out to be.
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Old 11-19-2013, 04:39 PM
 
Location: San Diego, California Republic
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Milan has colder winters than almost anything in inland California and its precipitation distribution is much more similar to the US East Coast than West Coast.
The overall weather pattern is still not the same which is why scientist usually classify it in a different climate. the winters are slightly colder than inland CA. Sacramento is cold in winter often with weeks of dense fog. Sometimes that fog freezes. If it does resemble the US east coast, it would be farther south like in the Carolinas.
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Old 11-19-2013, 04:43 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Western Massachusetts
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gentoo View Post
The overall weather pattern is still not the same which is why scientist usually classify it in a different climate. the winters are slightly colder than inland CA. Sacramento is cold in winter often with weeks of dense fog. Sometimes that fog freezes. If it does resemble the US east coast, it would be farther south like in the Carolinas.
Hmm. The fog could be a similarity, but it could be just geography rather than climate (warmer sea and cooler inland valley). Otherwise, what in particular about Milan's climate resembles California? What makes it more different from the east coast? The Carolinas look a lot hotter than Milan, don't see the resemblance as much as to the NYC area.
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Old 11-19-2013, 08:15 PM
 
Location: USA East Coast
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theunbrainwashed View Post
Korea is also very similar, except one, big, glaring difference. Most of Korea has a pronounced winter precipitation minimum, US east coast has uniform precip. There are very few places in the US with a Dw climate.


I did a paper in High school (a long time ago – lol) about the East Asian Monsoon. Since that time, I always thought monsoons were one of the most interesting (maybe the most interesting) aspect of climatology.

One thing that I do remember - is that that while the northern and central portions of the East Coast of the USA shows a fairly uniform precipitation pattern (not much seasonal rhythm)…the deep subtropical southern portions of the East Coast do not; From what I understand, the combination of being closest to the flow of unstable deep tropical air (in summer)…and being south and east of the storm track and closest to the subtropical Azores/West African High (in winter)…creates a wet summer/dry winter pattern. I lived for a time in southeast Florida and there was a definite winter dry/summer wet pattern.

If you look at most of the NWs stations from extreme southeast North Carolina southward….the 4 months of June through September often have between 50 and 60% of the entire annual precip. You can also see that the cool season/low sun from November through March has the least rainfall (getting drier the further south you get). You can see that right around 35 latitude (near Wilmington, NC) the winter precip starts to pick up as you approach the winter storm tracks. While not as striking as southeast Asia, there is a semblance of a seasonal monsoon on the lower East Coast:

Here are 6 NWS stations about 200 miles apart:




Last edited by wavehunter007; 11-19-2013 at 08:23 PM..
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Old 11-19-2013, 09:16 PM
 
Location: Sydney, Australia
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Central Asia comes very close, although they're more semi-arid than humid subtropical/continental in essence.
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Old 11-19-2013, 09:36 PM
 
Location: Northville, MI
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The Chinese East coast is very similar to the US east coast.

Roughly Speaking:
Tianjin=NYC
Shanghai=Raleigh
Guangzhou=Jacksonville
Haikou=Miami
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Old 11-20-2013, 04:27 AM
 
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Japan would have been a better match. China is too continental, stable and dry to be compared with the US.
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