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View Poll Results: What is Picton's climate (judging from its climate table)?
Oceanic 5 13.16%
Humid Subtropical 23 60.53%
Transitional 8 21.05%
Neither 2 5.26%
Voters: 38. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 11-28-2013, 06:55 AM
 
Location: Kharkiv, Ukraine
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Humid subtropical, oceanic climates can't have 28C+ highs in summer.
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Old 11-28-2013, 06:57 AM
 
Location: Buxton UK
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Subtropical.
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Old 11-28-2013, 12:02 PM
 
Location: Broward County, FL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe90 View Post
I think Diurnal range is much more latitude related, than climate type related. Most Oceanic climates are in higher latitudes, which is the reason for lower ranges. The highest world wide diurnal range at sea level locations at my latitude, are actually in Oceanic climates.
Interesting. What city/climate is that?
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Old 11-28-2013, 06:31 PM
 
Location: Top of the South, NZ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alex985 View Post
Interesting. What city/climate is that?
At 41S latitude my own climate has a range of 11.3C. I can't find anywhere else that high at sea level, although there could be somewhere I missed.


The highest humid subtropical I could find was 10-11C. Argentina has locations at 43-45" S, that are around 13C, although they are semi arid climates
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Old 11-29-2013, 04:12 PM
 
Location: Miami,FL
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I would say it's neither. it's warm temperate(temperate and sub-tropical are not the same thing).
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Old 03-16-2014, 02:28 PM
 
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Picton is subtropical.
Besides, biome is subropical :
Eastern Australian temperate forests
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Old 10-09-2014, 03:39 AM
 
Location: Bologna, Italy
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subtropical because:

summer highs are too high to be considered oceanic
it rains more in the summer than in the winter (oceanic would be the opposite)
winter is really mild

record lows are really low for summer though.

overall a very mild climate, summers are not too hot and winters are really mild. I wonder if it gets a lot of sun... I can't think of any similar climate in Europe... maybe parts of Portugal save for the lack of summer drought ?
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Old 10-09-2014, 04:35 AM
 
Location: Top of the South, NZ
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Originally Posted by forgotten username View Post
subtropical because:
it rains more in the summer than in the winter (oceanic would be the opposite)
Not true of all oceanic climates. New Zealand has climates with a summer rainfall maximum.
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Old 10-09-2014, 05:28 AM
 
Location: Bologna, Italy
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NZ lies in the same category as south australian climates then.
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Old 10-09-2014, 05:34 AM
 
Location: Sydney, Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by forgotten username View Post
subtropical because:

summer highs are too high to be considered oceanic
it rains more in the summer than in the winter (oceanic would be the opposite)
winter is really mild

record lows are really low for summer though.

overall a very mild climate, summers are not too hot and winters are really mild. I wonder if it gets a lot of sun... I can't think of any similar climate in Europe... maybe parts of Portugal save for the lack of summer drought ?
Despite its higher rainfall in the summer, it does get more drought in that season than in winter - specifically spring/early summer. That's why the bushfires in here occur in that period (late spring/early summer) - dry weather.

Late summer and early winter are considerably wet in southern NSW (Sydney, Picton, Wollongong, etc).
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