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View Poll Results: What is Picton's climate (judging from its climate table)?
Oceanic 5 13.16%
Humid Subtropical 23 60.53%
Transitional 8 21.05%
Neither 2 5.26%
Voters: 38. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 10-09-2014, 08:34 AM
 
Location: Bologna, Italy
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evaporation is always higher in the summer, summer rainfall does not always prevent fire.
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Old 10-09-2014, 11:44 AM
 
Location: Top of the South, NZ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by forgotten username View Post
NZ lies in the same category as south australian climates then.
The wet summer climates in NZ actually have less in common with southern Australian wet summer climates, than NZ wet winter climates do.

Oceanic climates aren't uniformly wetter in winter. NZ has climates with a rainfall peak in every season/month.
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Old 10-09-2014, 10:23 PM
 
Location: Sydney, Australia
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Originally Posted by forgotten username View Post
evaporation is always higher in the summer, summer rainfall does not always prevent fire.
True, but we get more drought in the summer than, say, autumn or early winter - which are more wet.

And your second statement isn't too factual. When we have wetter than average summers we don't even get bushfires, or they're just mild in impact.

On the contrary, Sydney's wettest month is June.
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Old 01-19-2015, 06:19 PM
 
Location: Key Biscayne, FL
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Originally Posted by alex985 View Post
I don't think it's a require for humid subtropical climates either, but oceanic climates in general don't really have high diurnal ranges.


Miami doesn't have a high diurnal range, so it wouldn't make sense if I were to say high diurnal ranges are a requirement for subtropical climates. I was kind of saying the high diurnal makes it "not oceanic" more than subtropical. I wouldn't really say it's subtropical myself to be honest.
Although miami isnt officially sub-tropical...its very borderline though.
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Old 01-19-2015, 06:20 PM
 
Location: Key Biscayne, FL
5,702 posts, read 3,185,410 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alex985 View Post
I don't think it's a require for humid subtropical climates either, but oceanic climates in general don't really have high diurnal ranges.


Miami doesn't have a high diurnal range, so it wouldn't make sense if I were to say high diurnal ranges are a requirement for subtropical climates. I was kind of saying the high diurnal makes it "not oceanic" more than subtropical. I wouldn't really say it's subtropical myself to be honest.
Although miami isnt officially sub-tropical...its very borderline though.

As a side note today was very nice at my local with 56/71 and plentiful sunshine
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Old 01-19-2015, 07:52 PM
 
Location: Adelaide, South Australia
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Originally Posted by Max96 View Post
Humid subtropical, oceanic climates can't have 28C+ highs in summer.
Melbourne's summers are gradually reaching and even surpassing those sorts of averages and it is almost universally considered oceanic.
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Old 01-19-2015, 10:18 PM
 
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Transitional with both characteristics.
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Old 03-19-2016, 10:56 PM
 
Location: Live:Downtown Phoenix, AZ/Work:Greater Los Angeles, CA
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This climate is subtropical, under my definition, an oceanic climates high temperature should never hit 27°C
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Old 03-20-2016, 02:27 AM
 
Location: Shrewsbury UK
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It actually looks like a tropical or subtropical highland climate, which is strange considering it's only 150m asl, near the coast and well outside the tropics. The diurnal range in the winter seems very large for a lowland location near the coast with no real dry season. It's close to this (further north, inland and much higher), minus the dry season:

http:// https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maseru

Seeing as climates can be called "oceanic" when they are nowhere near an ocean (e.g. Geneva), "tropical" outside the tropics (Florida) and "continental" on islands (Sapporo); can we call it a subtropical highland climate in a lowland location?
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Old 03-20-2016, 02:31 AM
 
Location: NSW
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Walshie79 View Post
It actually looks like a tropical or subtropical highland climate, which is strange considering it's only 150m asl, near the coast and well outside the tropics. The diurnal range in the winter seems very large for a lowland location near the coast with no real dry season. It's close to this (further north, inland and much higher), minus the dry season:

http:// https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maseru

Seeing as climates can be called "oceanic" when they are nowhere near an ocean (e.g. Geneva), "tropical" outside the tropics (Florida) and "continental" on islands (Sapporo); can we call it a subtropical highland climate in a lowland location?
I'm actually quite familiar with this climate (lived a year in nearby Camden), and is certainly colder in winter than near the coast, and summer hotter - but also shorter due to proximity to Southern Highlands.
I'd still call it Oceanic overall, not warm enough to be subtropical by Oz standards.
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