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Old 02-09-2014, 09:24 PM
 
Location: East coast
613 posts, read 959,493 times
Reputation: 311

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Do these places have a "double dormancy" where plants can't grow because it's too cold in the cold winter, even if it is wet (when it is below freezing) and also can't grow in the hottest time of summer (for lack of rain) so that there is brown/barren vegetation twice in the year and lush green in spring, or perhaps fall?

I've never been to a climate like this so I am curious as to what the seasonal changes look like? Is there only a short peak of green growth where vegetation is sandwiched between the dry and the cold?

I'm talking about a climate like this, but with maybe even colder winters.

Tehran - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Or perhaps one like this with more rain overall but a long dry season in summer.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kabul#G...nd_environment

I know there are some examples in the old world (central Asia, the Middle East) but I can't seem to find on Wikipedia where I saw them first. I'm talking places with months of freezing but where there is lots of precipitation and then hot, dry continental summers with barely any rain.
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Old 02-10-2014, 07:12 AM
 
Location: Hamburg, Germany
234 posts, read 268,830 times
Reputation: 120
Konya in Turkey has also a similar climate. Check it out on wiki.
I think small trees and shrubs are common in those regions: greenish in winter, turning to yellow in summer. I am not an expert in vegetation but interesting question!
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Old 04-24-2016, 12:19 AM
 
Location: Downtown Phoenix, AZ
22,301 posts, read 8,859,818 times
Reputation: 7176
Quote:
Originally Posted by markovian process View Post
Do these places have a "double dormancy" where plants can't grow because it's too cold in the cold winter, even if it is wet (when it is below freezing) and also can't grow in the hottest time of summer (for lack of rain) so that there is brown/barren vegetation twice in the year and lush green in spring, or perhaps fall?

I've never been to a climate like this so I am curious as to what the seasonal changes look like? Is there only a short peak of green growth where vegetation is sandwiched between the dry and the cold?

I'm talking about a climate like this, but with maybe even colder winters.

Tehran - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Or perhaps one like this with more rain overall but a long dry season in summer.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kabul#G...nd_environment

I know there are some examples in the old world (central Asia, the Middle East) but I can't seem to find on Wikipedia where I saw them first. I'm talking places with months of freezing but where there is lots of precipitation and then hot, dry continental summers with barely any rain.
Boise, ID is prob one of the best examples
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Old 04-24-2016, 05:05 PM
 
Location: Vancouver, WA
751 posts, read 558,376 times
Reputation: 245
We sort of have that here. I mean, most plants are evergreens and our winters aren't THAT cold, but I used to mow lawns in high school and there were basically two times of year where the grass was long: March-June and again in October.
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Old 04-13-2019, 12:20 AM
 
19 posts, read 22,103 times
Reputation: 48
The Dalles, Oregon is probably THE quintessential example of such a climate. The natural landscape is really only green from mid-March through mid-May. On rare occasions we get a "second spring" in October or early November IF we get lots of early fall rain.
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Old 04-13-2019, 11:45 AM
Status: "Back in Indiana, for now..............." (set 3 days ago)
 
Location: In climate zone Cfa/hardiness zone 8a /zip code 76131
3,974 posts, read 2,511,228 times
Reputation: 1412
I heard that global warming means that the Midwest may one day have such a climate, that is, if those alarmist predictions come to fruition.
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Old 04-13-2019, 12:28 PM
 
Location: SE Michigan
787 posts, read 492,988 times
Reputation: 616
Quote:
Originally Posted by Isleofpalms85 View Post
I heard that global warming means that the Midwest may one day have such a climate, that is, if those alarmist predictions come to fruition.
Anthropogenic global warming is happening, and definitely isn't alarmist, but I'm not sure how the Midwest would suddenly develop a Mediterranean climate without having a subtropical anticyclone to its southwest and a persistent low pressure system to its northwest.
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Old 04-13-2019, 12:41 PM
Status: "Back in Indiana, for now..............." (set 3 days ago)
 
Location: In climate zone Cfa/hardiness zone 8a /zip code 76131
3,974 posts, read 2,511,228 times
Reputation: 1412
^^^^^^^^^^^


I was thinking that the Midwest might someday have a dry summer continental climate(Dsa), not Mediterranean since a Mediterranean climate would imply the Midwest would have a subtropical component something I doubt will ever happen for the Midwest
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Old 04-13-2019, 03:39 PM
BMI
 
Location: Ontario
7,474 posts, read 5,352,984 times
Reputation: 5973
Quote:
Originally Posted by Isleofpalms85 View Post
^^^^^^^^^^^


I was thinking that the Midwest might someday have a dry summer continental climate(Dsa), not Mediterranean since a Mediterranean climate would imply the Midwest would have a subtropical component something I doubt will ever happen for the Midwest
I doubt the midwest will have a dry enough summer to qualify ...too much Gulf of Mexico
moisture and humidity to tap into.
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