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Old 06-04-2019, 11:51 AM
 
Location: Portsmouth, UK
12,581 posts, read 7,619,148 times
Reputation: 3736

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ScrappyJoe View Post
The "reverse west windflow" is his unique terminology, but I did find a Florida article that describes a "reverse summer pattern:"
https://www.baynews9.com/fl/tampa/ne...r_blog_reverse
And that states it is a perfectly normal weather set up in that part of Florida, which causes more shower activity on the coast, the complete opposite of what LKJ1988 & his "reverse west windflow" claims.
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Old 06-04-2019, 07:39 PM
 
Location: Erie, PA
3,678 posts, read 2,120,340 times
Reputation: 8613
Quote:
Originally Posted by Isleofpalms85 View Post
Don’t you think you’re exaggerating this miserable climate crap a little bit too much? . I find the idea of your location having “No Summers” as being a little far fetched and out of touch with reality

I live in Western PA not that far from Clarion and it's not miserable at all.

Yes, we get cold winters and of course we get snow--plenty of lake effect snow. Sort of comes with being on the correct side of a Great Lake.

It does rain here in the spring, we do get thunderstorms in the summer and of course it rains in the fall. So essentially, it's normal for its climate type with evenly distributed precipitation throughout the year. If you are looking for a dry climate then this isn't the place for you.

We do get relatively warm summers from later June-August. I wouldn't classify 3 to 3.5 months of temperatures averaging 70 F + constitute 'no summer'

Springs can be chilly and are interesting since you never know if it will be warm or if you will end up with snow but that is one of the charms of this place to me.

Skies are cloudy or overcast often but sometimes are partly sunny. Variety.

If anything this year, we have seen many more birds at our feeders and have plenty of hummingbirds. The plants and animals that live in this area of PA are adapted to this climate.

In other words, it isn't a miserable place, it is just a typical Dfb climate in the snow belt.

Believe me, there are a lot of climates out there that are truly miserable.
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Old 06-04-2019, 10:16 PM
 
Location: NYC
5,957 posts, read 2,696,578 times
Reputation: 3994
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marie Joseph View Post
the correct side of a Great Lake.

Correct side indeed. I am very much jealous of your snow totals!








Worst climates: I'd say most of Indonesia, Brazil, and more generally low-elevation (<1000 m) humid areas of the tropics. Particularly notable are places like Oranjestad, Manaus, and Bangkok, as well as more seasonal places like Bandar Abbas which sees the world's highest summer dew points (among inhabited cities).



In fact, all frost-free and snow-free climates are complete and utter failures from my perspective; the ones mentioned here are simply the worst, most mind-numbingly putrid, among those failures.
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Old 06-05-2019, 07:48 AM
 
Location: Live:Downtown Phoenix, AZ/Work:Greater Los Angeles, CA
26,751 posts, read 10,997,100 times
Reputation: 8952
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shalop View Post
Correct side indeed. I am very much jealous of your snow totals!








Worst climates: I'd say most of Indonesia, Brazil, and more generally low-elevation (<1000 m) humid areas of the tropics. Particularly notable are places like Oranjestad, Manaus, and Bangkok, as well as more seasonal places like Bandar Abbas which sees the world's highest summer dew points (among inhabited cities).



In fact, all frost-free and snow-free climates are complete and utter failures from my perspective; the ones mentioned here are simply the worst, most mind-numbingly putrid, among those failures.
From your perspective. I like the fact that Phoenix doesn't get snow and is generally frost free, I wouldn't have moved here on purpose otherwise
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Old 06-05-2019, 07:59 AM
 
Location: SE UK
10,319 posts, read 8,634,145 times
Reputation: 7125
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shirina View Post
I've lived in a lot of places - India, Morocco, the UK, and various places in the USA from Chicago to Houston, from Buffalo to Jacksonville ...

And the absolute WORST climate I have ever seen in my life - and it is the worst by far - no other place I've lived comes even close. In fact, no place I've ever been, much less lived, comes close ...

And that is Northwestern Pennsylvania.

For instance, here it is, June 3rd. If you look outside, it appears to be a gorgeous summer day. The sunshine is brilliant, the sky a perfect azure. An apparent gentle breeze is blowing through the trees. It makes you want to throw open all the doors and windows to let in the fresh summer air filled with the scent of flowers, loam, and living things.

But ... it's all an illusion. Because when I opened the front door today at 9am, the temperature was only 43F (5.5C). That's right. Our temperatures are only a few degrees above what it often is during the winter months. And it's June.

Yesterday, our high temperature was a mere 54F (12.2C) -- which is the low temperature most people on this forum are reporting. Yeah, our highs are your lows.

Forget about swimming or backyard barbeques. Forget about bike riding or taking walks. Forget about lounging on the porch with a good book or talking to friends on the patio. Forget about amusement parks, picnics, outdoor concerts, hiking, and small-town carnivals. Unless you like freezing half to death while you do those things.

During the last week of May, our low temperatures were below freezing. In fact, we did not get one single day with a high above 50F until mid-May. Even then, there were only a handful of those. Last year, we had snow right up until the first week of May.

What's more, today is unusual - because it's sunny. But then, I should expect as much because the only time it's sunny is when it's uncomfortably cold. It's not a bit nippy. It's not a tad on the chilly side. No, it's friggin' cold. Period. It is a harsh, bitter cold - the kind you'd normally expect in January or February. It's as if this little corner of misery cannot retain any heat - that all of the sun's energy bounces off an invisible force field somewhere up in the atmosphere, a force field that lets in light but no heat.

And, if you put your finger over western PA on a globe and then spin it clockwise so that your finger travels across the Atlantic - don't move your finger at all, keep it steady and still - you will arrive in Morocco where I used to live. There it is often balmy and beautiful complete with palm trees and a semi-tropical and semi-desert climate. We're on the exact same latitude as Morocco and yet our climate resembles (but is still worse than) places like Murmansk, Russia or Yakutsk, Siberia (which has a temperature a full 10F warmer than we are right now). Currently, we have a temperature colder than Anchorage, Alaska and 15 degrees colder than Narvik, Norway (and in case you don't know where Narvik is, it is only 130 miles south of the Arctic Circle).

Finally, keep in mind, this isn't some sort of cold snap nor is it a fluke. This is the way it is every year. In fact, winter reaches further and further into summer with every passing year. When I used to live here when I was a teen back in the early 2000s, this place was an Eden to me - it was stunningly beautiful. By now, it would be in the mid-70s(F) and it would be at least 80(F) by noon.

Our temps are consistently 20 to 30 degrees (F) below normal every year now. When you watch fireworks on the 4th of July, you can literally see your breath in the freezing night air. Animals are starving and their young are freezing to death. Hibernating animals don't awaken until May. We no longer get hummingbirds at our feeders. Even the pesky raccoons have packed up and gone elsewhere. Insects are non-existent. No bees. No grasshoppers. Only ants - but we only see them inside the house now as they try to escape from the cold. Never outdoors, though. No more snakes, no spiders, no mantises, no frogs and toads. The birdsong which was once deafening is almost non-existent now and our feeders sit empty.

Let this be a lesson - albeit anecdotal - to those foolish and myopic people who still think climate change is some kind of myth or hoax. I see it and feel it every single day. There is no summer here. The only time it gets warm, it rains ... and rains ... and rains. It will rain for however long it takes to drive the temperature back down to late winter or early spring temps. We have to run the heat all year long where once we had fans in the open windows. Almanacs show that our region receives only 70-75 sunny days per year. The rest of the time, we exist in a state of permanent twilight, a thick slate-grey overcast that keeps our world in a state of endless gloom. We have to turn on lights in the middle of the afternoon just to see.

Stars are also non-existent. As an avid star-gazer and very amateur astronomer, I haven't seen a star in well over a year. Maybe longer. This is because every night - and I do mean every night - even if the day is crystal clear, a thick, cold, and clammy fog envelopes this place every night as if caught in a bubble of misery. I know if I could rise just a few hundred feet, I would see a glorious star-speckled sky. But at ground level, there is no way to penetrate the thick and sickly-moist fog that makes everything cold and damp. It's like living in the bottom of a dungeon.

The miserable climate is reflected in the people, as well. Many people are rude, even mean, and never smile. It's as though everyone has simply given up on life. You can tell by the frumpy, sloppy way people dress, the unkempt and bedraggled hair, the clothes that look like they haven't been washed in a couple of months. Avoid eye-contact. Do not offer a smile. Never ever simply say hello to a stranger. They're likely to bite your head off and tell you to mind your own business.

Cabin fever has reached terminal levels as we've been stuck inside since last October. When we do get the occasional nice day, no one can enjoy it. Instead, everyone rushes outside to mow the lawn, pull weeds, and do other yardwork because it will rain before the day is over - yes, it WILL rain. Thus everyone has to use up the few hours of nice weather to do work since it may be weeks or even a month or more before another nice day reminds us of what we used to have every day.

In closing, I'll simply say: Stay away. Do not come here - don't even visit - unless it is a matter of life or death. In fact, if you have depression, don't come here for any reason since the endless misery our climate bestows will amplify your depression symptoms a hundred-fold. I've already lost several old friends to suicide - and several more have attempted it. I have never in my life seen a more depressing, ugly, demoralizing place to be than here.

Plus, what I have described are just the summer months. Winter is many times worse. Temperatures can drop to -25(F) overnight - as if every winter we're still fighting the Battle of Stalingrad (WWII buffs will know what I mean). Kids miss literally weeks of school due to sub-zero temperatures and dangerous conditions.

But I won't go into detail about the utter despair that is winter. All I can say is you've been warned. If, by chance, you have to drive through this abysmal place, try to get someone else to take the wheel. When you start seeing exit signs for a town called Clarion, throw a blanket over you and try to sleep through it. Once you hit the New York border, it's safe to wake up and enjoy summer again.

It's amazing just how much one can miss something as simple as driving with your window down to let the outside world into your car - especially at night. Now, one has to drive with the heater on full blast and the window securely in the up position.

As for me, I'm pretty much dead inside. The weather has a lot to do with that. For now I'm stuck here. But I'm already planning my escape from this soul-torturing pit of arctic wasteland that no sane human should ever have to endure.

Thanks for reading this far - and enjoy your summer. At least someone can.
Goodness you make it sound awful but I'm sure its not that bad, besides there are places on this planet where the weather 'kills' you, I reckon they are the real places on the planet that compete for the planets worst weather title.
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Old 06-05-2019, 04:53 PM
 
Location: Fort Worth, Texas
4,668 posts, read 3,149,155 times
Reputation: 1784
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marie Joseph View Post
I live in Western PA not that far from Clarion and it's not miserable at all.

Yes, we get cold winters and of course we get snow--plenty of lake effect snow. Sort of comes with being on the correct side of a Great Lake.

It does rain here in the spring, we do get thunderstorms in the summer and of course it rains in the fall. So essentially, it's normal for its climate type with evenly distributed precipitation throughout the year. If you are looking for a dry climate then this isn't the place for you.

We do get relatively warm summers from later June-August. I wouldn't classify 3 to 3.5 months of temperatures averaging 70 F + constitute 'no summer'

Springs can be chilly and are interesting since you never know if it will be warm or if you will end up with snow but that is one of the charms of this place to me.

Skies are cloudy or overcast often but sometimes are partly sunny. Variety.

If anything this year, we have seen many more birds at our feeders and have plenty of hummingbirds. The plants and animals that live in this area of PA are adapted to this climate.

In other words, it isn't a miserable place, it is just a typical Dfb climate in the snow belt.

Believe me, there are a lot of climates out there that are truly miserable.
How do Dfa climates like Indianapolis hold up to your expectations?
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Old 06-05-2019, 05:09 PM
 
Location: Erie, PA
3,678 posts, read 2,120,340 times
Reputation: 8613
Quote:
Originally Posted by Isleofpalms85 View Post
How do Dfa climates like Indianapolis hold up to your expectations?
Dfa climates are not bad though the summers tend to be a bit hotter than I prefer and have shorter winters.

Overall though I do find them decent since they tend to have interesting weather with plenty of thunderstorms and extreme events. Dfa climates still do have seasonality and Indianapolis is pretty well known for having some wild weather

Indianapolis is interesting because it can almost be considered a borderline Cfa climate. Of course it seems to vary from year to year.

Of the continental type climates my favorite type is Dfb followed by Dfc then Dfa.

If the first 2 letters of the climate type are 'Df' then it's a climate that I either really enjoy or can be okay with.
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Old 06-06-2019, 08:27 PM
 
Location: Seoul
11,584 posts, read 7,809,000 times
Reputation: 4606
Quote:
Originally Posted by LKJ1988 View Post
You also don't know. A west windflow 24/7 was not normal in FL for a summertime pattern until the mid 80's. Now with all the ice melting at a faster pace none will be left world wide within 90 years and even worse weather changes are coming. FL will be bone dry year round within 70 years as the ridge axis will sit over the southeast year round.
Tampa had 4.78 inches of rain this past May, more than 2x as much as the average. What are you on about
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Old 06-07-2019, 04:06 AM
 
21,214 posts, read 13,677,310 times
Reputation: 7248
Quote:
Originally Posted by Warszawa View Post
Tampa had 4.78 inches of rain this past May, more than 2x as much as the average. What are you on about
I had 4.05". So what does that that have to do with summer rain? That was in the spring and it is still spring.
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Old 06-07-2019, 08:16 AM
 
Location: Northern Virginia
3,568 posts, read 1,529,784 times
Reputation: 9048
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shirina View Post
I've lived in a lot of places - India, Morocco, the UK, and various places in the USA from Chicago to Houston, from Buffalo to Jacksonville ...

And the absolute WORST climate I have ever seen in my life - and it is the worst by far - no other place I've lived comes even close. In fact, no place I've ever been, much less lived, comes close ...

And that is Northwestern Pennsylvania.

For instance, here it is, June 3rd. If you look outside, it appears to be a gorgeous summer day. The sunshine is brilliant, the sky a perfect azure. An apparent gentle breeze is blowing through the trees. It makes you want to throw open all the doors and windows to let in the fresh summer air filled with the scent of flowers, loam, and living things.

But ... it's all an illusion. Because when I opened the front door today at 9am, the temperature was only 43F (5.5C). That's right. Our temperatures are only a few degrees above what it often is during the winter months. And it's June.

Yesterday, our high temperature was a mere 54F (12.2C) -- which is the low temperature most people on this forum are reporting. Yeah, our highs are your lows.

Forget about swimming or backyard barbeques. Forget about bike riding or taking walks. Forget about lounging on the porch with a good book or talking to friends on the patio. Forget about amusement parks, picnics, outdoor concerts, hiking, and small-town carnivals. Unless you like freezing half to death while you do those things.

During the last week of May, our low temperatures were below freezing. In fact, we did not get one single day with a high above 50F until mid-May. Even then, there were only a handful of those. Last year, we had snow right up until the first week of May.

What's more, today is unusual - because it's sunny. But then, I should expect as much because the only time it's sunny is when it's uncomfortably cold. It's not a bit nippy. It's not a tad on the chilly side. No, it's friggin' cold. Period. It is a harsh, bitter cold - the kind you'd normally expect in January or February. It's as if this little corner of misery cannot retain any heat - that all of the sun's energy bounces off an invisible force field somewhere up in the atmosphere, a force field that lets in light but no heat.

And, if you put your finger over western PA on a globe and then spin it clockwise so that your finger travels across the Atlantic - don't move your finger at all, keep it steady and still - you will arrive in Morocco where I used to live. There it is often balmy and beautiful complete with palm trees and a semi-tropical and semi-desert climate. We're on the exact same latitude as Morocco and yet our climate resembles (but is still worse than) places like Murmansk, Russia or Yakutsk, Siberia (which has a temperature a full 10F warmer than we are right now). Currently, we have a temperature colder than Anchorage, Alaska and 15 degrees colder than Narvik, Norway (and in case you don't know where Narvik is, it is only 130 miles south of the Arctic Circle).

Finally, keep in mind, this isn't some sort of cold snap nor is it a fluke. This is the way it is every year. In fact, winter reaches further and further into summer with every passing year. When I used to live here when I was a teen back in the early 2000s, this place was an Eden to me - it was stunningly beautiful. By now, it would be in the mid-70s(F) and it would be at least 80(F) by noon.

Our temps are consistently 20 to 30 degrees (F) below normal every year now. When you watch fireworks on the 4th of July, you can literally see your breath in the freezing night air. Animals are starving and their young are freezing to death. Hibernating animals don't awaken until May. We no longer get hummingbirds at our feeders. Even the pesky raccoons have packed up and gone elsewhere. Insects are non-existent. No bees. No grasshoppers. Only ants - but we only see them inside the house now as they try to escape from the cold. Never outdoors, though. No more snakes, no spiders, no mantises, no frogs and toads. The birdsong which was once deafening is almost non-existent now and our feeders sit empty.

Let this be a lesson - albeit anecdotal - to those foolish and myopic people who still think climate change is some kind of myth or hoax. I see it and feel it every single day. There is no summer here. The only time it gets warm, it rains ... and rains ... and rains. It will rain for however long it takes to drive the temperature back down to late winter or early spring temps. We have to run the heat all year long where once we had fans in the open windows. Almanacs show that our region receives only 70-75 sunny days per year. The rest of the time, we exist in a state of permanent twilight, a thick slate-grey overcast that keeps our world in a state of endless gloom. We have to turn on lights in the middle of the afternoon just to see.

Stars are also non-existent. As an avid star-gazer and very amateur astronomer, I haven't seen a star in well over a year. Maybe longer. This is because every night - and I do mean every night - even if the day is crystal clear, a thick, cold, and clammy fog envelopes this place every night as if caught in a bubble of misery. I know if I could rise just a few hundred feet, I would see a glorious star-speckled sky. But at ground level, there is no way to penetrate the thick and sickly-moist fog that makes everything cold and damp. It's like living in the bottom of a dungeon.

The miserable climate is reflected in the people, as well. Many people are rude, even mean, and never smile. It's as though everyone has simply given up on life. You can tell by the frumpy, sloppy way people dress, the unkempt and bedraggled hair, the clothes that look like they haven't been washed in a couple of months. Avoid eye-contact. Do not offer a smile. Never ever simply say hello to a stranger. They're likely to bite your head off and tell you to mind your own business.

Cabin fever has reached terminal levels as we've been stuck inside since last October. When we do get the occasional nice day, no one can enjoy it. Instead, everyone rushes outside to mow the lawn, pull weeds, and do other yardwork because it will rain before the day is over - yes, it WILL rain. Thus everyone has to use up the few hours of nice weather to do work since it may be weeks or even a month or more before another nice day reminds us of what we used to have every day.

In closing, I'll simply say: Stay away. Do not come here - don't even visit - unless it is a matter of life or death. In fact, if you have depression, don't come here for any reason since the endless misery our climate bestows will amplify your depression symptoms a hundred-fold. I've already lost several old friends to suicide - and several more have attempted it. I have never in my life seen a more depressing, ugly, demoralizing place to be than here.

Plus, what I have described are just the summer months. Winter is many times worse. Temperatures can drop to -25(F) overnight - as if every winter we're still fighting the Battle of Stalingrad (WWII buffs will know what I mean). Kids miss literally weeks of school due to sub-zero temperatures and dangerous conditions.

But I won't go into detail about the utter despair that is winter. All I can say is you've been warned. If, by chance, you have to drive through this abysmal place, try to get someone else to take the wheel. When you start seeing exit signs for a town called Clarion, throw a blanket over you and try to sleep through it. Once you hit the New York border, it's safe to wake up and enjoy summer again.

It's amazing just how much one can miss something as simple as driving with your window down to let the outside world into your car - especially at night. Now, one has to drive with the heater on full blast and the window securely in the up position.

As for me, I'm pretty much dead inside. The weather has a lot to do with that. For now I'm stuck here. But I'm already planning my escape from this soul-torturing pit of arctic wasteland that no sane human should ever have to endure.

Thanks for reading this far - and enjoy your summer. At least someone can.

This is a pretty hilarious rant because even though it is absurd, irrational hyperbole it does feel familiar. People living in cool temperate climates get super emotional about summer and the risk of a 'ruined' summer. I know because I was one of them growing up. If May and early June are cooler than average, people get legit anxious and you'll hear proclamations of how summer will be skipped this year etc. The length of winter and the relative shortness of the summer weather time window seems to turn many people into nervous wrecks.



I'll be entirely honest and admit that I don't really want to live in that kind of climate, but it's also far from the worst imaginable climate. Even if we ignore the barely if at all inhabited brutally frigid lands near the poles or the desert hellscapes of Africa and Asia...there's climates where a lot people live and yet the 70 degree mark is rarely broken and a wet, rainy 60 degree day is just considered a normal experience even in July or August.
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