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Old 01-23-2016, 05:26 PM
 
Location: The Future
172 posts, read 156,373 times
Reputation: 109

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I apologize for making yet another thread on this topic of subtropical climates, but upon looking at the Palm Tree Thread on this forum, I was quite interested in a comment that was posted within here:

Quote:
Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
Remove that understory, or better yet replace it with rhododendron, and you have rural PA. Your area seriously does not look one iota subtropical compared to what I saw in Augusta, GA on down to Savannah, GA. Louisiana must have gotten all its flora straight down from Missouri or something. Does all of Louisiana look like that?
I thought it would be quite interesting to compare the climate/environment of two states in the same region, to see if there are, in fact, differences between the two such that the quote above would be accurate.

Both Louisiana and Georgia are in the US South, and given the lack of marked topographic features in the area, other than the Appalachians, and Ozarks, the climate is expected to be quite uniform, in general. However, the quote above suggests that coastal GA has more "subtropical-looking" vegetation than Louisiana, or at least the area of the state that was being referred to.

So, I ask: which of the two states is more subtropical in climate? Which one looks more subtropical? Which of the two states would tender subtropical vegetation, including Norfolk Island Pines and Royal Palms, be more likely to survive in?

Last edited by Wipe0ut; 01-23-2016 at 05:42 PM..
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Old 01-23-2016, 05:28 PM
 
Location: Broward County, FL
16,199 posts, read 9,329,404 times
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Louisiana for sure. Georgia is much colder on average. Louisiana doesn't have anywhere that's like Blairsville and Georgia doesn't have any climate as warm as Pilottown (correct my spelling if I'm wrong).
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Old 01-23-2016, 05:43 PM
 
Location: 30461
2,133 posts, read 1,361,160 times
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Georgia has mountains whereas Louisiana does not, and I believe the Georgia coast sees freezing weather more often than the south coast of Louisiana. New Orleans hasn't hit freezing yet this season, whereas Savannah has managed to drop into the 20s on multiple occasions.

Atlanta has a colder climate than Shreveport, and Savannah averages a few degrees colder in winter than New Orleans. You can't really base weather or climate on vegetation alone. Louisiana overall has a warmer climate than Georgia does.
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Old 01-23-2016, 07:04 PM
 
Location: Windsor Ontario/Colchester Ontario
1,607 posts, read 1,599,034 times
Reputation: 1914
Probably lousiana, but the extreme South Georgia coast near the Florida border has many different palms, citrus and other subtropical plants, like in nearby Jacksonville Fla.
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Old 01-23-2016, 07:52 PM
 
Location: Alexandria, Louisiana
4,696 posts, read 3,535,087 times
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Overall, Georgia is easily colder. Its northern border is 35 N, while Louisiana's northern border is at 33 N. Louisiana also extends further south and doesn't have mountains.

Shreveport, LA and Columbus, GA are at nearly the same latitude and are pretty similar temperature-wise.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shreve...isiana#Climate
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Columbus,_Georgia#Climate

Albany, GA is a little north of Alexandria, LA. Albany has cooler lows but slightly warmer highs than Alexandria overall.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexan...hy_and_climate
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albany,_Georgia#Climate

Last edited by ral31; 01-23-2016 at 08:05 PM..
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Old 01-23-2016, 08:38 PM
 
Location: In transition
10,586 posts, read 13,469,271 times
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A place doesn't have to be subtropical to get a lot of greenery in the winter. Take a look at these pics I took around town in Vancouver. I think Louisiana is more subtropical FWIW because it has more swamps and low lying areas surrounded by water.





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Old 01-23-2016, 09:10 PM
 
Location: The Future
172 posts, read 156,373 times
Reputation: 109
It was just interesting what Tom77falcons said; his statement implies that southern Georgia looks more "subtropical" with evergreen trees, and plants, than Louisiana, or at least the area the photos were taken in. It would be interesting if that were the case, considering averages are warmer in LA, and that both state's record lows look quite cold. Either GA does indeed look more subtropical, or Tom77falcons has never been to Louisiana.
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Old 01-23-2016, 09:12 PM
 
Location: Broward County, FL
16,199 posts, read 9,329,404 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wipe0ut View Post
It was just interesting what Tom77falcons said; his statement implies that southern Georgia looks more "subtropical" with evergreen trees, and plants, than Louisiana, or at least the area the photos were taken in. It would be interesting if that were the case, considering averages are warmer in LA, and that both state's record lows look quite cold. Either GA does indeed look more subtropical, or Tom77falcons has never been to Louisiana.
South GA away from the coast has just as many if not more deciduous trees than Central Louisiana. He uses Brunswick and Savannah and the immediate as representative for South GA, but the reality is a place like Albany looks nothing like Savannah. Savannah easily has more evergreens and palms.
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Old 01-23-2016, 09:25 PM
 
Location: Lexington, KY
12,282 posts, read 7,886,383 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alex985 View Post
South GA away from the coast has just as many if not more deciduous trees than Central Louisiana. He uses Brunswick and Savannah and the immediate as representative for South GA, but the reality is a place like Albany looks nothing like Savannah. Savannah easily has more evergreens and palms.
That far south in Georgia, even inland, seems to have a bit more widespread pine forest than Central LA. Alexandria looks more like Macon than Albany.
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Old 01-23-2016, 09:27 PM
 
Location: U.S. (East Coast)
1,225 posts, read 1,164,419 times
Reputation: 2643
Louisiana.

Horrible.
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