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View Poll Results: Which has a better collection of climates?
The U.K. 44 35.77%
The U.S. South 79 64.23%
Voters: 123. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 05-31-2016, 11:16 AM
 
Location: York
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Winter in Charleston, Savannah and Mobile would be like spring in England. I'd certainly risk the potential cold outbreaks for the overall warmth of winter in these places.
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Old 05-31-2016, 11:34 AM
 
Location: Seoul
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EverBlack View Post
Ohh, how I understand you! I get a bit annoyed when people say "When it's cold you can dress up for it, when it's hot there's only so much you can take off". If it's -25 °C (-13 °F), for example, it's going to feel deadly uncomfortable, no matter how you dress. Even without wind. It feels like your nose is gonna fall on the ground. I think both extreme heat and extreme cold are bad. My ideal temperatures are between -3 °C and 25 °C.
Yasss, when its 5° you can wear a jacket, when it's -5° you can wear a coat, but below that no matter how much you wear it will be freeing and uncomfortable. Besides, wearing a lot of layers just feels uncomfortable
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Old 05-31-2016, 11:48 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Western Massachusetts
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Quote:
Originally Posted by B87 View Post
An air frost is the same thing as a freeze; the low temperature falling below 0c.
As a reminder to other British posters, "frost" in American weather terminology, just means frost appears on the ground, so can warmer than freezing where temperature is recorded. Our weather service uses "freeze" to refer to air temperature going to 0°C or below
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Old 05-31-2016, 11:49 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Western Massachusetts
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dean York View Post
Winter in Charleston, Savannah and Mobile would be like spring in England. I'd certainly risk the potential cold outbreaks for the overall warmth of winter in these places.
the South is a huge area, there's a big difference in climate between the deep south and upper south
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Old 05-31-2016, 11:53 AM
 
Location: Seoul
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The big problem is that the record lows in the south are much worse than anywhere in a England, and probably even worse than Norway
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Old 05-31-2016, 11:55 AM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
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Originally Posted by Warszawa View Post
The big problem is that the record lows in the south are much worse than anywhere in a England, and probably even worse than Norway

Cross polar flow and instability. Indeed.
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Old 05-31-2016, 12:07 PM
 
Location: Seoul
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Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
Cross polar flow and instability. Indeed.
Also the shape of the Rockies funnels the freezing Siberian air right into the northeast. And Hudson Bay does absolutely jack **** to moderate the climate. And of course James Bay is like a parking spot for the Polar Vortex that torments Quebec and the East Coast. And let's not forget the stupid Labrador current
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Old 05-31-2016, 01:35 PM
 
Location: Portsmouth, UK
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
As a reminder to other British posters, "frost" in American weather terminology, just means frost appears on the ground, so can warmer than freezing where temperature is recorded. Our weather service uses "freeze" to refer to air temperature going to 0°C or below
The UK uses the term "ground frost" where a visible frost has occurred at temperatures above 0C/32F & "air frost" if it is below 0C/32F...

Does the US keep seperate averages for the two types like the UK does?
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Old 05-31-2016, 02:50 PM
 
Location: Lizard Lick, NC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by flamingGalah! View Post
The UK uses the term "ground frost" where a visible frost has occurred at temperatures above 0C/32F & "air frost" if it is below 0C/32F...

Does the US keep seperate averages for the two types like the UK does?
I don't think so, wonder if we use the same requirements what freezes would amount to then in london. Also I belive noaa uses
38 and below for frosts.
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Old 05-31-2016, 02:55 PM
B87
 
Location: Surrey/London
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Round here the number of ground frosts isn't that different to the number of freezes; still far fewer than would be recorded in Raleigh though (which averages 69 freezes vs 33 at Heathrow, 25 at Greenwich or less than 10 in Central).
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