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View Poll Results: Which has a better collection of climates?
The U.K. 44 35.77%
The U.S. South 79 64.23%
Voters: 123. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 06-04-2016, 07:18 PM
 
Location: Seoul
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Sadly the great lakes are useless when it comes to moderating the area around them, if anything the Great Lakes make everything worse. It seems like they mostly help out the areas a hundred or more miles away, which is why the climate changes drastically from North Indiana to South Indiana|Kentucky
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Old 06-04-2016, 07:28 PM
 
Location: Seoul
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FirstName___LastName View Post
How so? Don't you see the warmth in winter temps at the western shore of Michigan's mitten vs that of Illinois and Wisconsin?
Can you post some examples? Because I've been researching and I can't see that at all, although the center of the mitten seems milder in winter than Upstate NY or Wisconsin. But the warmest places at the latitude would be Hartfoed and Sprignfield MA, hundreds of miles away from the Great Lakes
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Old 04-09-2020, 09:20 AM
Status: "119." (set 21 hours ago)
 
Location: Sheffield, England
3,543 posts, read 915,136 times
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UK by miles. Who wants choking heat and humidity for months on end? Maybe lots do but not me.
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Old 04-09-2020, 12:30 PM
 
Location: Lancashire, United Kingdom
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Depends on which part of the UK you're in vs which part of Southern US, but I would prefer the UK climate because the summers aren't ridiculously hot.
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Old 04-09-2020, 01:17 PM
 
2,249 posts, read 1,051,630 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Warszawa View Post
Sadly the great lakes are useless when it comes to moderating the area around them, if anything the Great Lakes make everything worse. It seems like they mostly help out the areas a hundred or more miles away, which is why the climate changes drastically from North Indiana to South Indiana|Kentucky
Not entirely true.

I live less than 2 miles from lake Erie.

Here are some effects, both good and bad.


Right near the lakes spring is colder, and fall is warmer due to a marine influence.

Expect increased cloud cover and rain/Snow in the fall and winter

It has a moderating effect on summer it's not uncommon to have day after day of perfect summer weather.

The lakes definitely increase the humidity in the area.

Occasionally in the late summer or fall there will be waterspouts.
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Old 04-09-2020, 01:22 PM
 
2,249 posts, read 1,051,630 times
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I love a state like NC for climate.

You pretty much have every possible climate you can think of from sub tropical coast, to temperate rainforest and cool highland climate with ski resorts.

Granted NC climate is heavily impacted by elevation and relation to the ocean or mountains but it has pretty much any type of weather you want.
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Old 04-09-2020, 08:54 PM
 
Location: Putnam County, TN
1,058 posts, read 415,347 times
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The U.S. South wins this easily for me.

Both have mild winters; although the U.S. South gets cold snaps, it also gets warm snaps and has a longer growing season. I'm so cold intolerant that I require at least a significant minority of warm days year-round and a cold season lasting less than three months, although ideally would be places like Dallas with 0 months with sub-55F average highs.

Yes, I know it gets REALLY hot and humid, which I don't exactly like, but eventually I realized that even 100F and humid bothers me less than 48F without wind - and in both cases adding sun and a slight amount of physical activity (walking, pressure washing, etc.) to it - and that's in my ideal short sleeves/shorts, but even adding long sleeves and gloves to the 48F makes it merely equal to the 100F humidity rather than more bearable.

Although the coastal U.S. South has hurricanes, even cold east coast places like coastal Maine aren't exactly safe from them, and there are MANY inland places away from the hurricanes - not nearly all of which are chilly like Kentucky, northern Virginia and West Virginia.

Even Nashville winters are barely bearable for me in terms of UV index, which is affected by both cloud cover and latitude. Also, winter days would be really short in the upper-middle latitudes.

Sure, Chinese Windmill Palms and Chilean Wine Palms will grow easily in the U.K., but Needle Palms and Dwarf Palmettos will grow easily in the U.S. South. And there are WAY more broadleaf evergreen plants that actually have lush colored leaves that'll grow in the U.S. South, such as Southern Magnolia, American Holly, Spoonwood, Great Rhododendron and evergreen oaks (Escarpment Live Oak for Upland South and Southern Live Oak for Deep South). Not to mention Cabbage Palmetto will grow properly even away from the coast; not really in the Upland South, but still in inland Deep South areas like Dallas/Fort Worth, Atlanta and Memphis.
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Old 04-10-2020, 04:42 PM
 
Location: Erie, PA
3,682 posts, read 2,125,602 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eman Resu VIII View Post
UK by miles. Who wants choking heat and humidity for months on end? Maybe lots do but not me.
I'm okay with humidity but agree with the heat as I am not a fan of it. I personally feel that 21 C/70 F is warm enough for summer but there really is nowhere here in the U.S. that has temperatures like that all summer. I'm lucky to live somewhere with a short summer and long, cold winters so I will take it.

The UK has a lot of good climates for people who like moderation and don't want hot summers or cold winters. Cornwall looks to be especially mild and even places further north like Sheffield look like they would be a place winter coats would not be needed.

I would miss my cold winters. Perhaps I would do okay in a place like Dalwhinnie
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Old 04-10-2020, 05:17 PM
 
1,981 posts, read 1,188,280 times
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If we are talking fog in the US the worst has gotta be Cape disappointment here in Washington. I was stationed in the southern US for a couple years (Florida and South Carolina) and don't really remember fog being a thing there. Here in Olympia it's quite frequent as well outside of the summer months as in you can bet on fog at least a few times a week.

Quote:
Cape Disappointment receives about 2,552 hours of fog a year—the equivalent of 106 days—making it one of the foggiest places in the US.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cape_D...nt_(Washington)

That said, I pick the UK. The heat and humidity in the south is terrible and I absolutely hated the weather while I was there.
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Old 04-10-2020, 05:25 PM
Status: "119." (set 21 hours ago)
 
Location: Sheffield, England
3,543 posts, read 915,136 times
Reputation: 1925
Quote:
Originally Posted by fluffydelusions View Post
I was stationed in the southern US for a couple years (Florida and South Carolina) and don't really remember fog being a thing there.

That's why I find it so funny that South Carolina still gets more fog days per annum than Sheffield Columbia SC averages 48 days with fog which was actually higher than any location in Northern England in the "Regional Climates of British Isles" book I own bar one which was equal to Columbia's figure.

Yet people like Wavehunteroo7 and others still believe the myth perpetuated in the movies that the UK is fog infested 364 days a year, maybe he watches too much Mary Poppins ah hahah.

The myth of the UK being foggy actually could have been from the days when there was huge pollution especially in London that caused thick smog until the Clean Air Act was introduced in the 1950s, now you don't see anything like that. And that was due to pollution from coal burning.

Last edited by Eman Resu VIII; 04-10-2020 at 05:36 PM..
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