U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Weather
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
View Poll Results: Which has a better collection of climates?
The U.K. 44 35.77%
The U.S. South 79 64.23%
Voters: 123. You may not vote on this poll

Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 04-10-2020, 05:46 PM
 
1,981 posts, read 1,183,678 times
Reputation: 1790

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Eman Resu VIII View Post
The myth of the UK being foggy actually could have been from the days when there was huge pollution especially in London that caused thick smog until the Clean Air Act was introduced in the 1950s, now you don't see anything like that. And that was due to pollution from coal burning.
Yeah this is something I've heard a lot as well.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-10-2020, 06:12 PM
Status: "131." (set 4 days ago)
 
Location: Sheffield, England
3,530 posts, read 909,509 times
Reputation: 1925
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marie Joseph View Post
I'm okay with humidity but agree with the heat as I am not a fan of it. I personally feel that 21 C/70 F is warm enough for summer but there really is nowhere here in the U.S. that has temperatures like that all summer. I'm lucky to live somewhere with a short summer and long, cold winters so I will take it.

The UK has a lot of good climates for people who like moderation and don't want hot summers or cold winters. Cornwall looks to be especially mild and even places further north like Sheffield look like they would be a place winter coats would not be needed.

I would miss my cold winters. Perhaps I would do okay in a place like Dalwhinnie
For me summers of 24-25°C would be OK even with high humidity but I think anything more is over rated.

Cornwall has pretty mild winters but it's quite windy and wetter compared to where I live, which can make quite a difference in the feel. I personally do wear a coat in winter here, I prefer mild winters and mild/moderate summers. I'm more of a "cold hater" than anything else I'm afraid lol but I still dislike the heat of the US south a lot.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-10-2020, 07:27 PM
 
Location: Putnam County, TN
1,058 posts, read 413,291 times
Reputation: 715
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eman Resu VIII View Post
OH NO! I just looked at some data for places in the US "deep south" and they all had more, substantially more in a few cases, days of fog than Sheffield. Damn, would be choking and reeling about in all that fog then all that heat and humidity most the year then!
Probably just seems more gloomy there either because it's cloudier, or else due to the low UV index and short winter days. But it's still very much real, no matter the reason.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-10-2020, 08:59 PM
Status: "131." (set 4 days ago)
 
Location: Sheffield, England
3,530 posts, read 909,509 times
Reputation: 1925
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sun Belt-lover L.A.M. View Post
Probably just seems more gloomy there either because it's cloudier, or else due to the low UV index and short winter days. But it's still very much real, no matter the reason.

It's sure more gloomy with low cloud a lot of the time. But the fog is more or less not a thing.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-10-2020, 11:00 PM
 
Location: Putnam County, TN
1,058 posts, read 413,291 times
Reputation: 715
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eman Resu VIII View Post
It's sure more gloomy with low cloud a lot of the time. But the fog is more or less not a thing.
True about the fog, but I was referring to the greyness being real regardless of the cause(s).
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-11-2020, 06:04 AM
Status: "131." (set 4 days ago)
 
Location: Sheffield, England
3,530 posts, read 909,509 times
Reputation: 1925
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sun Belt-lover L.A.M. View Post
True about the fog, but I was referring to the greyness being real regardless of the cause(s).

It can be quite gloomy in winter, but not all the time. A lot of the gloom stereotypes come from days when there was bad pollution due to coal burning etc.. The stereotype may have a grain of truth even today, but I'm not sure why people so often associate that with low visibility type conditions, visibility is usually very good here in winter. The way some people talk about the British climate in winter you'd think you could barely see more than 100 yards infront of you!

As someone who actually lives here, I'd say it's the short daylengths and low sun angle that contribute most to the feel of it ever being "darker" in winter, because it literally IS dark rfom about 8:30 to 4:00 here in Northern England. Southern England (lived there for 12 years) was rather brighter. Anyway, we get to compensate in summer with very nice long days and sunsets at 10:00 and beyond, with comfortable temperatures. So I'm not bothered.

Last edited by Eman Resu VIII; 04-11-2020 at 07:25 AM..
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-11-2020, 07:42 AM
 
Location: Atlanta
5,559 posts, read 4,708,605 times
Reputation: 4652
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eman Resu VIII View Post
UK by miles. Who wants choking heat and humidity for months on end? Maybe lots do but not me.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eman Resu VIII View Post
Yet people like Wavehunteroo7 and others still believe the myth perpetuated in the movies that the UK is fog infested 364 days a year, maybe he watches too much Mary Poppins ah hahah.
And here you are perpetuating stereotypes about the US South.
For one, "choking heat and humidity" is very subjective. As someone who's actually spent decades in warm climates, I'd only consider Texas and right along the Gulf Coast/Florida as actually sweltering to the point where I don't even want to go outside. And only southern Florida is like that half the year. Dallas is just a few months.
Atlanta isn't even that bad at its peak. And that's just a couple of months. May is almost always comfortable and September is beautiful unless it's a delayed Fall. Even if it's considered a little warm, it's far from sweltering.
Pretty much no one thinks Asheville is sweltering in the summer.
Still not good enough? Plenty of mountain towns in NC have very mild summers.
Highlands and Banner Elk are just a couple degrees warmer than London in the summer and are actually even colder in the winter.

In the US South you can get warm, mild, or even cool/cold winters. You can get hot summers if you want (great for water sports), you can get very warm, or just mild/slightly warm and comparable to London.
And if the weather is too warm in Atlanta one weekend, Highlands, NC is just over 2 hours away. It's not like you're stuck surrounded by heat with no escape.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-11-2020, 07:58 AM
Status: "131." (set 4 days ago)
 
Location: Sheffield, England
3,530 posts, read 909,509 times
Reputation: 1925
Quote:
Originally Posted by sedimenjerry View Post
And here you are perpetuating stereotypes about the US South.
Well listen - the stereotype about fog in England is simply wrong. Not an exaggeration, but wrong, as I explained. Whereas the heat and humdity of southern US is very much a thing, for a vast majority of the area.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sedimenjerry View Post
For one, "choking heat and humidity" is very subjective. As someone who's actually spent decades in warm climates, I'd only consider Texas and right along the Gulf Coast/Florida as actually sweltering to the point where I don't even want to go outside. And only southern Florida is like that half the year. Dallas is just a few months.
Atlanta isn't even that bad at its peak. And that's just a couple of months. May is almost always comfortable and September is beautiful unless it's a delayed Fall. Even if it's considered a little warm, it's far from sweltering.
Indeed it is subjective, and to me, anything over 27°C with high humiity is a waste of time. Atlanta would be plenty bad for me, and that's all that matters, to me. The UK has a far more comfortable climate, in my opinion.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sedimenjerry View Post

Pretty much no one thinks Asheville is sweltering in the summer.
Still not good enough? Plenty of mountain towns in NC have very mild summers.
Highlands and Banner Elk are just a couple degrees warmer than London in the summer and are actually even colder in the winter.
Ah, but I'm a cold hater as much as I'm a heat hater. I would hate the winters of Asheville and the high places of the south. They are also far wetter.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sedimenjerry View Post

In the US South you can get warm, mild, or even cool/cold winters. You can get hot summers if you want (great for water sports), you can get very warm, or just mild/slightly warm and comparable to London.
And if the weather is too warm in Atlanta one weekend, Highlands, NC is just over 2 hours away. It's not like you're stuck surrounded by heat with no escape.

These areas which are the coolest of the US south are warmer or considerably warmer than London in summer, have much colder winters (which I don't like), are wetter, and represent a very small proportion of the US south.

The stereotype of the US south having hot and humid summers really isn't a stereotype at all, the one of the UK being foggy absolutely is. That's why you have to cherry pick places in the US south that aren't as hot while I demonstrated that the foggiest places in England have no more fog than the US south either.

But anyway, who cares? I like what I like, you like what you like. I was clearly defying a ridiculous stereotype from a banned user troll (wavehunterOO7) who keeps coming back again and again to argue nonsense - because we know from before he has an anti-UK/Europe agenda he likes to perpetrate at every given opportunity.

Last edited by Eman Resu VIII; 04-11-2020 at 08:28 AM..
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-11-2020, 08:49 AM
 
Location: Atlanta
5,559 posts, read 4,708,605 times
Reputation: 4652
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eman Resu VIII View Post
let alone 5 months. No thanks.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eman Resu VIII View Post
Well listen - the stereotype about fog in England is simply wrong. Not an exaggeration, but wrong, as I explained. Whereas the heat and humdity of southern US is very much a thing, for a vast majority of the area.

Indeed it is subjective, and to me, anything over 27°C with high humiity is a waste of time. Atlanta would be plenty bad for me, and that's all that matters, to me. The UK has a far more comfortable climate, in my opinion.

Ah, but I'm a cold hater as much as I'm a heat hater. I would hate the winters of Asheville and the high places of the south. They are also far wetter.

These areas which are the coolest of the US south are warmer or considerably warmer than London in summer, have much colder winters (which I don't like), are wetter, and represent a very small proportion of the US south.

The stereotype of the US south having hot and humid summers really isn't a stereotype at all, the one of the UK being foggy absolutely is.

But anyway, who cares? I like what I like, you like what you like. I was clearly defying a ridiculous stereotype from a banned user troll (wavehunterOO7) who keeps coming back again and again to argue nonsense - because we know from before he has an anti-UK/Europe agenda he likes to perpetrate at every given opportunity.
Well you were the one to make a sweeping generalization of the US South. 5 months is flat out false.
And actually, since England does get fog, that's also an exaggeration that's obviously in response to your exaggeration. And regardless, England is very gloomy in the winter. In fact, that is gloominess for months on end.

Asheville really only has colder nights in January compared to Sheffield. Highs are higher, daily mean is like a degree or 2 cooler but with longer days, higher sun angle, fewer precip days. Outside of nighttime and the first couple hours of the day, you'll feel warmer in Asheville on average. "much colder" really isn't true except for morning lows but even then, at 20F I'm wearing a coat. At 35F, I'm wearing a coat.

And the mountains may be a small proportion of the south, but it's actually a considerably large area. The US South as a region is much larger than the UK. The mountainous areas with highs in the upper 70s to mid 80s is certainly larger than all of Wales and just eyeballing it, probably at least half the size of Scotland.
I mean, the straight line distance from Miami to Atlanta looks to be as long if not longer than the entire length of Great Britain. The south is much larger even just in terms of latitude. That's the thing about the US South, it has a greater variety of climate than I think you give it credit for.
Inverness is wayyy up there and yet it's barely cooler in the winter than London.

I only care because you're pushing a ridiculous stereotype that the south is sweltering for months on end.
And this is climate battle thread so of course we're gonna argue about it. That's the spirit of the thread.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-11-2020, 09:04 AM
Status: "131." (set 4 days ago)
 
Location: Sheffield, England
3,530 posts, read 909,509 times
Reputation: 1925
Quote:
Originally Posted by sedimenjerry View Post
Well you were the one to make a sweeping generalization of the US South. 5 months is flat out false.
And actually, since England does get fog, that's also an exaggeration that's obviously in response to your exaggeration. And regardless, England is very gloomy in the winter. In fact, that is gloominess for months on end.

Asheville really only has colder nights in January compared to Sheffield. Highs are higher, daily mean is like a degree or 2 cooler but with longer days, higher sun angle, fewer precip days. Outside of nighttime and the first couple hours of the day, you'll feel warmer in Asheville on average. "much colder" really isn't true except for morning lows but even then, at 20F I'm wearing a coat. At 35F, I'm wearing a coat.

And the mountains may be a small proportion of the south, but it's actually a considerably large area. The US South as a region is much larger than the UK. The mountainous areas with highs in the upper 70s to mid 80s is certainly larger than all of Wales and just eyeballing it, probably at least half the size of Scotland.
I mean, the straight line distance from Miami to Atlanta looks to be as long if not longer than the entire length of Great Britain. The south is much larger even just in terms of latitude. That's the thing about the US South, it has a greater variety of climate than I think you give it credit for.
Inverness is wayyy up there and yet it's barely cooler in the winter than London.

I only care because you're pushing a ridiculous stereotype that the south is sweltering for months on end.
And this is climate battle thread so of course we're gonna argue about it. That's the spirit of the thread.
No, no, no, no, no.

I am not pushing a stereotype at all, because I'm stating my subjective opinion about temperatures. You can read into that pushing a stereotype all you like, but that's not what is happening here. If I were stating that "oh the US south is objectively hot and humid for everybody for 5 months because I say so", then I could accept your accusations, but I am giving my opinion based on my temperature comfort threshold.

Fog, however, is a weather occurence that either is or isn't, and has a specific frequency of occurence; and the UK's climate is NOT defined by it as some think, therefore, when someone incorrectly claims we are defined by fog, they are flat wrong, and pushing a well-known stereotype. Sure it still happens (as I actually quoted from the book "Regional Climates of the British Isles", in a previous response in this thread, go back and look please - this shows you don't read what people write, bad for an argument), but no more than most of the US south which makes that a moot point.

I never once denied that the UK was gloomy in winter (not at other times, btw) so I don't know why you're telling me that. I actually stated it quite clearly in some of my posts. WavehunterOO7 never said "gloomy", he said "fog". So do not change what others actually said to support your argument.

Most of the south is too hot for me for 5 months for the most part. This thread is about people's subjective choices about these climates. That's my verdict. You don't understand this yet. I would be having far more problems with the heat in the US south than anybody coming to the UK is going to have with fog. When I say choking heat and humidity and for 5 months of end, that is how it is for me. My subjective view.

When WavehunterOO7 says "choking fog" in England, that is objectively wrong. There is nothing subjective about saying England is defined by choking fog, because it can actually proven to be true or false - whereas saying there's 5 months of heat and humidity in most of the US south is a subjective opinion for me, and you are distorting this, acting as though I am making objective statements about the US south when I am doing the opposite. Strawman.

I am sure you understand the difference between fact and opinion? I'm talking in opinions. Talking about how hot you think a place is, is subjectve, talking about the freuqency of occurence of fog, is objective. I hope you understand now.

Last edited by Eman Resu VIII; 04-11-2020 at 10:26 AM..
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Weather

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2021, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top