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View Poll Results: Which has a better collection of climates?
The U.K. 44 35.77%
The U.S. South 79 64.23%
Voters: 123. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 05-30-2016, 07:10 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ABrandNewWorld View Post
Some people prefer cooler summers but poll after poll on here shows that most people have a preference for summers with highs in the 80sF vs. highs less than 20C as well as warm convective downpours as opposed to continuous cold overcast drizzle.
Yes, we've done it about a hundred times here. Why keep doing it over and over again? People on this forum tend to have stronger views and preferences with regards to weather. Not a scientific poll by any means.

And summers in the UK are not continuous cold overcast drizzle. Talk about exaggeration. You are comparing an entire undefined region of the US South with a smaller island nation...apples and oranges.
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Old 05-30-2016, 07:27 PM
 
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I don't understand folks that prefer heat over cold. It's easy enough to add layers when it gets cold. But heat? There's only so much you can legally take off.
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Old 05-30-2016, 10:42 PM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 0MEGA View Post
Interesting.

Frostless areas in the South this past winter include South Texas and Peninsular Florida, some Atlantic coastal islands off Georgia and the Carolinas, coastal Louisiana (New Orleans, Grand Isle), and northern coastal Texas (central Houston, Galveston, etc).


How often does this happen though lol?


Wanna bet next winter every single one of those areas will go below freezing with the exception of extreme S. Florida, and maybe extreme S. Texas. Statistics bear this out that they will pay for that next winter.
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Old 05-30-2016, 10:44 PM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EverBlack View Post
The U.K. of course! The Southern U.S. is too hot for most of the year.


And veers way too far below its average temps in winter. That is the huge drawback of the area if you ask me.
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Old 05-30-2016, 11:02 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
How often does this happen though lol?


Wanna bet next winter every single one of those areas will go below freezing with the exception of extreme S. Florida, and maybe extreme S. Texas. Statistics bear this out that they will pay for that next winter.

Yes, places like Austin, Mobile, and Jacksonville may get a couple of nights of hard freezes in winter but then it warms right back up to around 70F quickly (which much of the U.K won't even get much of the summer). Winter instability wobbling between 20 and 85F all winter > stable temps stuck in the "meh" range of 0-10C all winter.
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Old 05-31-2016, 01:56 AM
 
Location: Athens, Greece (Hometowm: Irmo, SC)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by muslim12 View Post
Yeah, good guess lol. So still a good third of winter nights are above freezing. This past December- January period we had 39. So most nights this winter were above freezing. To be fair London has a massive UHI and is at a coastal location, how are the stats for places more inland?
Yeah, once you get out of London it gets significantly cooler- a bit superfluous of a word for England, but I'm sure you get what I mean. I can't even find stats concerning nights below freezing for London, much less anything outside of London. Halyp!
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Old 05-31-2016, 02:05 AM
 
Location: Athens, Greece (Hometowm: Irmo, SC)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by flamingGalah! View Post
Well as myself & others have said Raleigh does indeed get more frosts than London, not sure why you find that hard to believe

And as much as I would like to find the data for you, I can't be bothered (maybe someone else will) but the data is out there on the old inter web for all to (find) see...
Because in my mind, London overnight lows hover just a few degrees above Celsius for nearly 4 months. With Raleigh, you'd get many nights below freezing, but you'd also have the days and nights that are infamous for their temperature swings and stay well above freezing for overnight lows. Knowing this, I could see London predominantly having more below freezing nights than Raleigh.


Well, without your help, I suppose I will be ignorant to the "fact" that Raleigh gets more below freezing nights than Raleigh
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Old 05-31-2016, 02:31 AM
B87
 
Location: Surrey/London
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Quote:
Originally Posted by smithgn View Post
Because in my mind, London overnight lows hover just a few degrees above Celsius for nearly 4 months. With Raleigh, you'd get many nights below freezing, but you'd also have the days and nights that are infamous for their temperature swings and stay well above freezing for overnight lows. Knowing this, I could see London predominantly having more below freezing nights than Raleigh.


Well, without your help, I suppose I will be ignorant to the "fact" that Raleigh gets more below freezing nights than Raleigh
Heathrow has 30 freezing night per year, and the average coldest low over the course of the year is -5c.

The central part of London gets around 5-10 freezing nights, and rarely drops below -2c on the coldest nights.

Further afield, Rothamsted (the famous frost hollow, and the coldest nights in southern England) gets 48 frosts per year, still a significant improvement over Raleigh.

Last edited by B87; 05-31-2016 at 02:54 AM..
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Old 05-31-2016, 04:44 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Western Massachusetts
46,079 posts, read 47,482,407 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by smithgn View Post
Because in my mind, London overnight lows hover just a few degrees above Celsius for nearly 4 months. With Raleigh, you'd get many nights below freezing, but you'd also have the days and nights that are infamous for their temperature swings and stay well above freezing for overnight lows. Knowing this, I could see London predominantly having more below freezing nights than Raleigh.
Did you mean less? English temperatures are less variable than southern US ones. In its coldest month (by nights), London Heathrow averages 35.8°F, it goes below freezing 30% of the time:

London Heathrow Airport climate information - Met Office

33 "air frosts", meaning freezes on average per year in London Heathrow. Stations outside London vary, I saw 35-50. Since the average low is close to freezing already, it doesn't take much extra cold or variability to increase the number of freezing nights.
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Old 05-31-2016, 05:58 AM
 
Location: Portsmouth, UK
12,604 posts, read 7,652,804 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by muslim12 View Post
I rightfully accused those people though. One guy tried to say London regularly gets humid heat which is wrong. I never said anything wrong about Raleigh. We were talking about winter nights , that why I only mentioned winter, had yall asked I would have includes those months. So no valid argument to back up your claim. Keep trying, I have yet to hear incriminating evidence lmao.
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