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Old 09-28-2016, 10:36 AM
 
Location: João Pessoa,Brazil(The easternmost point of Americas)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lommaren View Post
I guess that nature in Patagonia is because summers are borderline subarctic in nature?

In effect the fourth warmest month around or slightly above 10 C.
Trees are deciduous because of winter,not summer.

Winters in that region i told can get very cold sometimes,with several days with high below freezing and lows may get -20/-25C sometimes.
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Old 09-28-2016, 10:53 AM
 
Location: Foreignorland 58 N, 17 E.
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Our trees in a semi-continental climate with a -2 January mean look far more 'tropical' than those. Is it just a case of the weather stations being in the wrong places down there?
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Old 09-28-2016, 11:02 AM
 
Location: João Pessoa,Brazil(The easternmost point of Americas)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lommaren View Post
Our trees in a semi-continental climate with a -2 January mean look far more 'tropical' than those. Is it just a case of the weather stations being in the wrong places down there?
Weather stations in Patagonia are limited to the towns.

Maybe because your place have more pine trees,while this region of Patagonia are formed purely by broadleaved trees.
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Old 10-14-2016, 07:31 PM
 
Location: Sydney, Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ghost-likin View Post
Unbelievable how thoses place have such cold averages in winter but yet relative mild record lows.

But imo,the Areas just east of Andes between 40S and 50S are the closest to Continental climate that someone will find here in Southern Hemisphere,not just because of temperatures,but the deciduous vegetation make it more visible.

Where here in SH you will find an landscape like that ? only in Patagonia.

They have "mild" record lows because they're still quite adjacent to the ocean and, of course, there is no large landmass between Australia and the antarctic. Even South America is slightly connected to Antarctica.

I wouldn't say that vegetation makes a climate more or less continental. It's the temperature that matters.
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Old 10-14-2016, 08:44 PM
 
Location: João Pessoa,Brazil(The easternmost point of Americas)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ethereal View Post
They have "mild" record lows because they're still quite adjacent to the ocean and, of course, there is no large landmass between Australia and the antarctic. Even South America is slightly connected to Antarctica.

I wouldn't say that vegetation makes a climate more or less continental. It's the temperature that matters.
South America arent connected to Antarctic LOL,there are a great ocean dividing it.

Another thing is,if you look all around the world,the vegetation of Continental climates are most deciduous,while the milder Oceanic West Coast are more evergreen,in Patagonia you can find both environments within 100km of difference,for example,around 40S-50S you will find an Evergreen forest(similar to New Zealand/Australia),then when you goes west and gets higher altitude the species bacame to get mixed evergreen/deciduous until it reach fully deciduous on the more Continental eastern parts of Andes,nexts images are from a place near the Chilean Coast,clearly showing the lush evergreen forest and the other are on a place east of Andes,huge difference dont? the vegetation clearly shows the great winter instability on eastern parts of Andes.


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Old 10-14-2016, 11:21 PM
 
Location: Sydney, Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ghost-likin View Post
South America arent connected to Antarctic LOL,there are a great ocean dividing it.
I know, that's why I said "slight". South America's tail, if you will, is rather proximate to Antarctica. Even if it is not "touching" it.

Quote:
Another thing is,if you look all around the world,the vegetation of Continental climates are most deciduous,while the milder Oceanic West Coast are more evergreen,in Patagonia you can find both environments within 100km of difference,for example,around 40S-50S you will find an Evergreen forest(similar to New Zealand/Australia),then when you goes west and gets higher altitude the species bacame to get mixed evergreen/deciduous until it reach fully deciduous on the more Continental eastern parts of Andes,nexts images are from a place near the Chilean Coast,clearly showing the lush evergreen forest and the other are on a place east of Andes,huge difference dont? the vegetation clearly shows the great winter instability on eastern parts of Andes.
This could be a fluke in nature, because this logic is made irrelevant since the most frigid parts of the world such as Siberia, Alaska and parts of northern Canada have evergreens (look up boreal forests). How do you explain that? How do you explain subarctic/subpolar climates that do NOT have trees which lose their foliage?

Here is the cold zone that MOSTLY has evergreens (pines and spruces):


P.S Yes, the taiga zone has larches (deciduous trees), but they don't dominate.
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Old 10-15-2016, 08:16 AM
 
Location: João Pessoa,Brazil(The easternmost point of Americas)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ethereal View Post
I know, that's why I said "slight". South America's tail, if you will, is rather proximate to Antarctica. Even if it is not "touching" it.


This could be a fluke in nature, because this logic is made irrelevant since the most frigid parts of the world such as Siberia, Alaska and parts of northern Canada have evergreens (look up boreal forests). How do you explain that? How do you explain subarctic/subpolar climates that do NOT have trees which lose their foliage?

Here is the cold zone that MOSTLY has evergreens (pines and spruces):


P.S Yes, the taiga zone has larches (deciduous trees), but they don't dominate.
I have wrote wrong,isnt west ,but going east,the climate became more unstable.

Are you kidding right? The forests there are made up by PINES,this specie of tree dont have broadleaved foliage,their needle foliage are a special adaptation to the cold and snow,because that they are evergreen.
Im talking here about the broadleaved trees(maples,oaks etc).
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Old 10-15-2016, 05:39 PM
 
Location: Foreignorland 58 N, 17 E.
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On Sweden's east coast the taiga starts a bit further up than on that map. Hudiksvall at 61.41 N has a 'prone to cold snaps'-version of our climate...
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Old 10-15-2016, 07:35 PM
 
Location: Sydney, Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ghost-likin View Post
I have wrote wrong,isnt west ,but going east,the climate became more unstable.

Are you kidding right? The forests there are made up by PINES,this specie of tree dont have broadleaved foliage,their needle foliage are a special adaptation to the cold and snow,because that they are evergreen.
Im talking here about the broadleaved trees(maples,oaks etc).
Why are you changing subjects and backpedaling? Before, you were clearly talking about how evergreens can't survive in the cold and how deciduous trees can. And now, out of the blue, you bring up broadleaved trees. Be consistent.

Still, pines are evergreen (as you know), like eucalyptus. Which proves that both hot and cold climates alike can have evergreens. And you know that this was my point the whole time.
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Old 10-15-2016, 07:56 PM
 
Location: João Pessoa,Brazil(The easternmost point of Americas)
2,540 posts, read 2,003,466 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ethereal View Post
Why are you changing subjects and backpedaling? Before, you were clearly talking about how evergreens can't survive in the cold and how deciduous trees can. And now, out of the blue, you bring up broadleaved trees. Be consistent.

Still, pines are evergreen (as you know), like eucalyptus. Which proves that both hot and cold climates alike can have evergreens. And you know that this was my point the whole time.
Pines are out of question,they evolved to survive in hash conditions,because that they have NEEDLE LEAVES,who dont let snow accumulate on them,while broadleaved trees are less coldy-hardy,because that they need lose their leaves for the cold season,you should study more about trees since you dont know the difference between pine trees and broadleaved trees.

Im sure thoses Eucalyptus would not survive in thoses Eastern Parts of Patagonian Andes because of the extreme cold that happens sometimes.
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