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Old 03-05-2008, 05:15 PM
 
Location: Paris, France
75 posts, read 260,285 times
Reputation: 29

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Well, in Paris:

Summer:

Very hot: 91 and above
Hot: 80-90
Warm: 73-79
Mild: 64-72
Cool:50-63
Cold: below 50

Winter:

No heat in winter here
Warm: 53-60
Mild: 45-52
Cool: 36-44
Cold: below 35
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Old 03-05-2008, 05:29 PM
 
9 posts, read 6,517 times
Reputation: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by §AB View Post
Ill start by saying COLD SUCKS AND I HATE IT BEYOND ALL COMPREHENSION.
Put some clothes on. It makes a big difference.
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Old 03-06-2008, 04:46 PM
 
Location: Utah
5,094 posts, read 15,301,087 times
Reputation: 5270
Summer

Hot Above 95
cold below 50

Winter
Warm Above 50
Cold below zero
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Old 03-06-2008, 05:01 PM
 
Location: Perth, Western Australia
9,594 posts, read 25,185,604 times
Reputation: 3581
Quote:
Originally Posted by dxiweodwo View Post
i know 10F is bitterly cold, especially when it's overcast and windy, not too bad when it's sunny and calm though.
Well you did ask if (or why) we thought 10 F was bitter...

I just remembered winter is usually breezy-windy this far north... especially anywhere right on the Great Lakes.

Sunshine while not "scarce" in Chicago is scarce in Toronto.
When it's severely cold, we are more likely to see sun than "normal,"
but we still only have maybe a 50% chance of sunny weather when it's severely cold here.

I noticed that anywhere from say KY, TN, VA or NC southwards,
usually the winds are light to non-existant most of the winter.
This seemed delightful to me, yet also bizarre.

Our average windspeed in winter is roughly 10-14 mph everywhere in southern Ontario,
while somewhere like Atlanta might only average 6-8 mph.

So anything colder than 10 F would be considered "bitter" because we have at least a 2-in-3 chance of having frequent 15+mph gusts.

*Sunny and calm is quite rare here.
We probably only get 10-20 days like that from November to March, at any kind of temperature.

Last edited by ColdCanadian; 03-06-2008 at 05:13 PM..
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Old 03-06-2008, 05:15 PM
 
Location: Perth, Western Australia
9,594 posts, read 25,185,604 times
Reputation: 3581
Quote:
Originally Posted by lemon drop View Post
Put some clothes on. It makes a big difference.
It's the summer where he is;

he should only need clothes for modesty or preventing sunburns.
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Old 03-06-2008, 08:35 PM
 
Location: still in exile......
29,910 posts, read 9,084,362 times
Reputation: 5904
Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdCanadian View Post
Well you did ask if (or why) we thought 10 F was bitter...

I just remembered winter is usually breezy-windy this far north... especially anywhere right on the Great Lakes.

Sunshine while not "scarce" in Chicago is scarce in Toronto.
When it's severely cold, we are more likely to see sun than "normal,"
but we still only have maybe a 50% chance of sunny weather when it's severely cold here.

I noticed that anywhere from say KY, TN, VA or NC southwards,
usually the winds are light to non-existant most of the winter.
This seemed delightful to me, yet also bizarre.

Our average windspeed in winter is roughly 10-14 mph everywhere in southern Ontario,
while somewhere like Atlanta might only average 6-8 mph.

So anything colder than 10 F would be considered "bitter" because we have at least a 2-in-3 chance of having frequent 15+mph gusts.

*Sunny and calm is quite rare here.
We probably only get 10-20 days like that from November to March, at any kind of temperature.
that's very true, usually our coldest nights here in winter are below 15F or at times below 10F, and it's usually clear and calm, i know it's a lot more cloudy up there, i was in Saranac Lake, NY in ealry January saw the sun maybe 10% of the time. Which i really didn't mind, beacuse i like cold, cloudy weather
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Old 03-06-2008, 08:38 PM
 
Location: still in exile......
29,910 posts, read 9,084,362 times
Reputation: 5904
Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdCanadian View Post
Well you did ask if (or why) we thought 10 F was bitter...

I just remembered winter is usually breezy-windy this far north... especially anywhere right on the Great Lakes.

Sunshine while not "scarce" in Chicago is scarce in Toronto.
When it's severely cold, we are more likely to see sun than "normal,"
but we still only have maybe a 50% chance of sunny weather when it's severely cold here.

I noticed that anywhere from say KY, TN, VA or NC southwards,
usually the winds are light to non-existant most of the winter.
This seemed delightful to me, yet also bizarre.

Our average windspeed in winter is roughly 10-14 mph everywhere in southern Ontario,
while somewhere like Atlanta might only average 6-8 mph.

So anything colder than 10 F would be considered "bitter" because we have at least a 2-in-3 chance of having frequent 15+mph gusts.

*Sunny and calm is quite rare here.
We probably only get 10-20 days like that from November to March, at any kind of temperature.
we do have some cold snaps that are windy, though. We've had mornings here at 12F with a windchill of -8 before, heck and even -10F(January 1985) with a windchill of -30F.
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Old 03-07-2008, 08:48 AM
 
Location: Perth, Western Australia
9,594 posts, read 25,185,604 times
Reputation: 3581
Quote:
Originally Posted by dxiweodwo View Post
we do have some cold snaps that are windy, though. We've had mornings here at 12F with a windchill of -8 before, heck and even -10F(January 1985) with a windchill of -30F.
20 degree drop in temps for windchill might be windy for Georgia, but it does not sound extremely-windy here.

Even on a "non-windy" or normal wind day, windchill is always 10-15 F colder than ambient.
It's normal for us to have a temp, say 10 F (-13 C) and a windchill as low as as -20 F. (-29 C)

Or in other words, sustained winds up to about 22 mph (35 km/h) with gusts at 42 mph (65 km/h) are not unusual for a windy day here.
That can easily last 12 hours here. It's also possible for the winds to be as high as 42 mph sustained (65 km/h) and gusts at 65 mph (100 km/h),
however that is not normal, but very stormy winds, though we experience that once almost every winter.

Sometimes I think it's a little unfair that the winds down south are very light in winter and/or year round yet their temperatures are mild anyways, so "you don't need it", making a 50 F southern-winter day feel more like our 55-60 F spring/fall days, since we're cold already, and at least 2-out-of-3 days the wind makes it a lot nastier.

Although it sounds like I'm trying to one-up you and or Georgia, I WISH we could brag about calmer winds up here.
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Old 03-08-2008, 01:32 PM
j33
 
4,625 posts, read 13,236,049 times
Reputation: 1717
SUMMER
Won't leave the house unless forced to hot ... 95 or above
Hot........ 85 or above
Warm..... 75-85
Nice out. ..... 70-80
Cool ...... 60-69
Cold ...... below 60

WINTER
Warm .... 40 and above
Cool ...... 25-40
Nice out (e.g will go for long walks and spend time outdoors)..... 25 or above
Cold ..... 15- 25
really cold...0-15
Bitter cold...below 0 (-17C)
Will call a taxi to take me to work because I don't want to walk to the subway cold ... somewhere around -5F or below
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Old 10-27-2011, 12:38 AM
 
1 posts, read 1,926 times
Reputation: 12
I spent about an hour on this. I'm a dork, love weather, and love terminology. The following is a proposed absolute temperature terminology scale (that can be used regardless of the season).

Extremely hot ... 110s+
Very hot ... 100s
Hot .... 90s
Warm .... 80s
Fine .... 70s
Mild ..... 60s
Cool ...... 50s
Cold ...... 40s
Freezing .... 30s
Subfreezing... 20s
Teenal ... 10s
Digital ... 0s
Subzero ... -10s
Arctic ... -20s and below
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