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Old 03-22-2017, 01:35 PM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deneb78 View Post
I am impressed that coastal NZ has such mild winter record lows. Wellington is at a higher latitude than NYC yet has a warmer record low than pretty much everywhere in the USA except the Florida Keys, Lowland Hawaii and the Tropical US territories. It is really impressive!

Not impressive to me. It is because of a huge ocean sitting between them and the South Pole. Same for Bermuda, Azores, Australia (Australia is really just a huge island).

That is it in a nutshell. If they were connected by land to the South Pole it would be no different than here and they would have some pretty serious record lows. Same for all climates surrounded by vast distances of water.

I'm not impressed by that. It is what water does and rather simple.

I much more impressed with how stable China is given its giant landmass and continental climate, but lucky to have a huge impressive annually naturally created Siberian High pressure that prevents deep low pressure swinging across their continent every winter. The huge landmass of Siberia creates the High Pressure. I find that fascinating that a yearly permanent high pressure system protects them by blocking the formation of low pressure systems.

When you live in the eastern US, you quickly realize that our worst cold comes from low pressure not high pressure. The cold sits up in Canada, and a deeply strong low pressure system comes across, usually from the Pacific Ocean, and then deepens and in its wake pulls down bitterly cold air sitting in Canada. It takes the right combo though to happen. Really cold air has to be sitting up there in eastern Canada, usually air from the pole. If the air in northern Ontario or Quebec is just average temps, by the time it makes it south it is not impressive and drops us around 10-15F below our avg lows. However, if it is well below avg in Canada, then it does a number on us like just last week when that deep snow bomb low pulled that cold air all the way down into the deep south after it swept thru. That is when we drop 20F or more below our average winter low temps.
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Old 03-22-2017, 02:23 PM
 
Location: João Pessoa,Brazil(The easternmost point of Americas)
2,535 posts, read 1,718,135 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post

I much more impressed with how stable China is given its giant landmass and continental climate, but lucky to have a huge impressive annually naturally created Siberian High pressure that prevents deep low pressure swinging across their continent every winter. The huge landmass of Siberia creates the High Pressure. I find that fascinating that a yearly permanent high pressure system protects them by blocking the formation of low pressure systems.

When you live in the eastern US, you quickly realize that our worst cold comes from low pressure not high pressure. The cold sits up in Canada, and a deeply strong low pressure system comes across, usually from the Pacific Ocean, and then deepens and in its wake pulls down bitterly cold air sitting in Canada. It takes the right combo though to happen. Really cold air has to be sitting up there in eastern Canada, usually air from the pole. If the air in northern Ontario or Quebec is just average temps, by the time it makes it south it is not impressive and drops us around 10-15F below our avg lows. However, if it is well below avg in Canada, then it does a number on us like just last week when that deep snow bomb low pulled that cold air all the way down into the deep south after it swept thru. That is when we drop 20F or more below our average winter low temps.
Yup, Asia is far more stable and colder in winter than North America.
I prefer North America because you at least have a chance of mild temperatures for a good period,while in Northeastern Asia even in a above average winter you still will be very cold.
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Old 03-22-2017, 02:31 PM
 
Location: United Kingdom
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What about the Northern part of Spain, Santander?
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Old 03-22-2017, 02:59 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GymFanatic View Post
What about the Northern part of Spain, Santander?
Similar, but the the cloud pattern is a bit off.
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Old 03-22-2017, 03:04 PM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ghost-likin View Post
Yup, Asia is far more stable and colder in winter than North America.
I prefer North America because you at least have a chance of mild temperatures for a good period,while in Northeastern Asia even in a above average winter you still will be very cold.

I wouldn't call it "very cold". Beijing is warmer in winter than Chicago, and far warmer in summer. Shanghai still has palm trees and orange groves: they just don't get below freezing hardly at all. Here it is more up and down all winter with each passing low pressure system.

And in Beijing, from what I noticed, their spring comes on quite quickly and earlier than here. They are cold for three months and then bam the warm up starts. Beijing has warmer avg temps in Jan than Chicago, and far warmer in March. Also a higher zone rating for growing things and quite a bit warmer record low temps. March and April are warmer in Beijing than Chicago. Beijing and Philly are tied in March and in April Beijing is 2C warmer than here. But the kicker is our record low in April is 14F, while their record low is 26F. For May record low here is 28F and in Beijing 36F. No frosts in May ever in Beijing.
Huge difference. They would rarely if ever lose their peach or cherry crop to extreme cold in April like we did last year.

I will always choose stability over some fleeting winter warmth followed by cold, rinse repeat.
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Old 03-22-2017, 03:12 PM
 
Location: United Kingdom
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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Santa_Maria_Island
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Old 03-22-2017, 04:14 PM
 
Location: Wellington and North of South
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GymFanatic View Post
A bit too cloudy, and the seasonal change in cloudiness is too great. The annual mean temp. is about 1.2C warmer than any NZ location.
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Old 03-22-2017, 04:15 PM
 
Location: João Pessoa,Brazil(The easternmost point of Americas)
2,535 posts, read 1,718,135 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
I wouldn't call it "very cold". Beijing is warmer in winter than Chicago, and far warmer in summer. Shanghai still has palm trees and orange groves: they just don't get below freezing hardly at all. Here it is more up and down all winter with each passing low pressure system.

And in Beijing, from what I noticed, their spring comes on quite quickly and earlier than here. They are cold for three months and then bam the warm up starts. Beijing has warmer avg temps in Jan than Chicago, and far warmer in March. Also a higher zone rating for growing things and quite a bit warmer record low temps. March and April are warmer in Beijing than Chicago. Beijing and Philly are tied in March and in April Beijing is 2C warmer than here. But the kicker is our record low in April is 14F, while their record low is 26F. For May record low here is 28F and in Beijing 36F. No frosts in May ever in Beijing.
Huge difference. They would rarely if ever lose their peach or cherry crop to extreme cold in April like we did last year.

I will always choose stability over some fleeting winter warmth followed by cold, rinse repeat.
But Pyongyang at 39N is well colder than Chicago who is at 41N, and its record low is only 3C less than Chicago, how you explain that?
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Old 03-22-2017, 04:26 PM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ghost-likin View Post
But Pyongyang at 39N is well colder than Chicago who is at 41N, and its record low is only 3C less than Chicago, how you explain that?

Why don't you explain it. I brought up China as an example as somewhere I'm impressed with stability, and you threw in peninsular North Korea for some reason. Maybe it has to do with 1971-1990 averages in NK vs 1981-2010 for Chicago. I don't really care. Regardless, my point was about stability in the giant landmass of China.
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Old 03-22-2017, 06:55 PM
 
Location: João Pessoa,Brazil(The easternmost point of Americas)
2,535 posts, read 1,718,135 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
Why don't you explain it. I brought up China as an example as somewhere I'm impressed with stability, and you threw in peninsular North Korea for some reason. Maybe it has to do with 1971-1990 averages in NK vs 1981-2010 for Chicago. I don't really care. Regardless, my point was about stability in the giant landmass of China.
I dont know why, maybe the mountains to it north and northwest block the cold?
One thing Im sure, the Korean Peninsula has the coldest winter on the world considering it latitude and proximity to the sea.
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