U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Weather
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 03-25-2017, 09:41 AM
BMI
 
Location: Ontario
7,471 posts, read 6,291,565 times
Reputation: 6066

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Razza94 View Post
Really? The record low at Hong Kong Observatory is 0C.
You're correct.

I remember seeing on the news about the cold ...late January 2016 (Jan. 24-25)
Low at the Hong Kong Observatory was 3.3C ...not below freezing but quite cold
for being in the tropics at sea level. Hong Kong is very hilly / mountainous,
and some areas did go below freezing, coldest spot -6.1C
Some people even went up into the hills to take pictures of frost.
Hong Kong has average January highs in the teens...around 18C,
similar to southern coast of Spain where Junter hangs out,
and southern Spain is about 15 degrees farther north of the equator.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-26-2017, 03:34 AM
 
Location: Top of the South, NZ
20,012 posts, read 18,005,736 times
Reputation: 6894
Quote:
Originally Posted by Razza94 View Post
Some parts of coastal California seem to be a good at match for NZ.
Can't agree with this. Temperatures aren't comparable between any two locations, and California is a dry/ wet season climate. NZ weather is much more dynamic.
.
The U.K. Would be more comparable.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-26-2017, 06:06 AM
 
6,122 posts, read 3,388,038 times
Reputation: 2243
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe90 View Post
Can't agree with this. Temperatures aren't comparable between any two locations, and California is a dry/ wet season climate. NZ weather is much more dynamic.
.
The U.K. Would be more comparable.
Fair point, I'm sometimes guilty of being tunnel-visioned towards the temperatures.

SF doesn't seem far off with the average highs, but the rainfall is way off.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-27-2020, 04:37 AM
 
33 posts, read 12,482 times
Reputation: 53
cold wet and windy would be a good way to summarise NZ climate. For its latitude it’s the coldest place in the world that hasn’t got a continental climate. The fact that we are comparing a country with the same latitude as the Mediterranean with a place like the UK is testament to how affected NZ is by polar systems. with the exception of a few places on the east coast most places in NZ barely reach 20 degree average in summer. The summers in general are very mild even compared to the UK with most places failing to reach 30 degrees. That said some places have heat spikes (not heat waves as the hot weather doesn’t hang around long enough) which will give impressive temps to the east coast and very low humidity but on average these places are still quite cool as the 35 degree days will be followed by 15 degree days.

The far north incl Auckland has very stable summer temps that don’t normally have maxes below 20 or above 30. Auckland as mentioned before has a climate that’s mostly dry in summer with the exception of the subtropical lows that bring rain as well as high humidity and dew points. Mostly though it’s SW breezes, partly cloudy with 24 degrees and 50% humidity and no rain.

as for the dry spot in the South Island. Central Otago NZs “outback” easily the hottest place in the South Island regarding average summer highs and prob more likely to reach 30 degrees than any other part of NZ (maybe Hawkes Bay could challenge it). It’s also the most varied rainfall place in the country with summer being much wetter than winter due to the heat. Winters here are dry and very cold by NZ standards.

NZs winter in general are nice compared to other places especially for temps and sunshine (unlike summer). Aucklands wind isn’t really as issue as temps are too mild for it to chill you... and the rain showers don’t last long enough from the SW to be too big an issue... but from a subtropical low the whole days gonna be washed out.

another factor may be the summer sun... it may not shine too much but when it does it can be quite strong.

But in general across the whole country as an average it’s a cold, wet and windy place with moderate sunshine
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-27-2020, 12:06 PM
 
Location: Top of the South, NZ
20,012 posts, read 18,005,736 times
Reputation: 6894
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtuckster View Post
cold wet and windy would be a good way to summarise NZ climate. For its latitude it’s the coldest place in the world that hasn’t got a continental climate. The fact that we are comparing a country with the same latitude as the Mediterranean with a place like the UK is testament to how affected NZ is by polar systems. with the exception of a few places on the east coast most places in NZ barely reach 20 degree average in summer. The summers in general are very mild even compared to the UK with most places failing to reach 30 degrees. That said some places have heat spikes (not heat waves as the hot weather doesn’t hang around long enough) which will give impressive temps to the east coast and very low humidity but on average these places are still quite cool as the 35 degree days will be followed by 15 degree days.

The far north incl Auckland has very stable summer temps that don’t normally have maxes below 20 or above 30. Auckland as mentioned before has a climate that’s mostly dry in summer with the exception of the subtropical lows that bring rain as well as high humidity and dew points. Mostly though it’s SW breezes, partly cloudy with 24 degrees and 50% humidity and no rain.

as for the dry spot in the South Island. Central Otago NZs “outback” easily the hottest place in the South Island regarding average summer highs and prob more likely to reach 30 degrees than any other part of NZ (maybe Hawkes Bay could challenge it). It’s also the most varied rainfall place in the country with summer being much wetter than winter due to the heat. Winters here are dry and very cold by NZ standards.

NZs winter in general are nice compared to other places especially for temps and sunshine (unlike summer). Aucklands wind isn’t really as issue as temps are too mild for it to chill you... and the rain showers don’t last long enough from the SW to be too big an issue... but from a subtropical low the whole days gonna be washed out.

another factor may be the summer sun... it may not shine too much but when it does it can be quite strong.

But in general across the whole country as an average it’s a cold, wet and windy place with moderate sunshine
No where in NZ has a 20C average in summer.

Have spent a lot of summers in central Otago and don't agree about heat and convection being the main cause of higher summer rainfall. It might account for an increase of rain days, but my experience is that lows off the east coast pack a bit more punch - note that Dunedin also has higher summer rainfall

Some very calm places in NZ- very hard to find a less windy coastal location anywhere in the world, than where I live in the top of the South Island

Last edited by Joe90; 06-27-2020 at 12:38 PM..
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-28-2020, 12:52 PM
 
Location: Saint-Petersburg
681 posts, read 236,404 times
Reputation: 181
New Zealand has mild oceanic climate without big heatwaves and cold snaps. Unlike Europe, sunshine is more evenly distributed (about 100 hours in June and 200 - 250 in January). UV indexes are higher becuase of lower latitude. Europe has UV index 3 - 7, while New Zealand has UV index 5 - 9.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-28-2020, 02:03 PM
 
Location: Top of the South, NZ
20,012 posts, read 18,005,736 times
Reputation: 6894
Quote:
Originally Posted by klimkin199 View Post
New Zealand has mild oceanic climate without big heatwaves and cold snaps. Unlike Europe, sunshine is more evenly distributed (about 100 hours in June and 200 - 250 in January). UV indexes are higher becuase of lower latitude. Europe has UV index 3 - 7, while New Zealand has UV index 5 - 9.
UV index is higher in NZ than at the same latitude in Europe.

Reasons for higher UV are differing ozone levels, earth being closer to the sun in the southern summer, and less land based pollutants due to being surrounded by ocean.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-28-2020, 02:30 PM
 
Location: Fort Worth, Texas
4,806 posts, read 3,501,860 times
Reputation: 1866
Isn’t it subtropical and or warm oceanic with a few areas of cool temperate oceanic nearest to Antarctica?
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-28-2020, 02:56 PM
 
Location: Top of the South, NZ
20,012 posts, read 18,005,736 times
Reputation: 6894
Quote:
Originally Posted by Isleofpalms85 View Post
Isn’t it subtropical and or warm oceanic with a few areas of cool temperate oceanic nearest to Antarctica?
I would say a mixture of cool/warm oceanic, and some D climates at higher altitude.

Subtropical would refer to some of the environment imo.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-28-2020, 03:33 PM
 
Location: Portsmouth, UK
12,810 posts, read 8,023,702 times
Reputation: 3802
Quote:
Originally Posted by klimkin199 View Post
New Zealand has mild oceanic climate without big heatwaves and cold snaps. Unlike Europe, sunshine is more evenly distributed (about 100 hours in June and 200 - 250 in January). UV indexes are higher becuase of lower latitude. Europe has UV index 3 - 7, while New Zealand has UV index 5 - 9.
The UV index in Europe reaches 10/11 in southern Europe, here it generally peaks around 12 close to the summer solstice. Also it gets much higher than 9 in New Zealand, it peaks at 12/13 & can even reach higher on occasions, I believe the highest recorded was 16.8 & even on the south Island it can reach 14.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Weather

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2022, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top