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Old 11-16-2017, 08:20 PM
 
Location: Lizard Lick, NC
6,166 posts, read 3,315,364 times
Reputation: 1748

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ericmrtt View Post
I hope to move to Southern Florida soon. I mean seriously Atlanta has some ridiculous weather! I mean a lot of the Eastern US isn't great to begin with. But out of the top ten largest US metropolitan areas, did Atlanta get their first freeze first? That's crazy! Beating out points north...like Philly, DC, NYC, Boston......Really? Boston?? Even Chicago!

Hotlanta is not as hot as a lot think it is. Of course I known that for years. So a move to Southern Florida soon hopefully! The weather in Florida is definitely not as bad if you like it warmer(and of course they do have high hurricane risk which isn't a good thing), though the high humidity can make it very uncomfortable at times. But I'll take it! Atlanta can be randomly chilly/ridiculously chilly to cold or very cold in all seasons(least likely in summer but below 60 temps can even sneak up on you in July...in the morning). Florida while it does has its cons weatherwise, I rather take Florida's warm weather consistency to GA. From Nov to March, Florida especially Southern Florida is pretty comfortable.... whereas GA esp Atlanta Metro and North GA goes from 70 to 30 or below daily, with tons of days not even getting anywhere near 70(and do mean A LOT! Not many days hit 70 here in Dec, Jan, and Feb, not even close in many years)....yeah I rather Florida!!!
You are very misleading... considering Atlanta hits 70 every winter... every month of winter... hell in Raleigh i average 1/3rd of the DJF period 60+ , Atlanta being a bit warmer can easily average 30-35 days 60+ in winter....
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Old 11-16-2017, 08:31 PM
 
20,975 posts, read 6,363,939 times
Reputation: 13966
We have three houses - and, yep, we move back and forth to take advantage of the weather. We'll be headed to Sarasota in mid-Dec...

Being retired there is a calculation to make. You only have X number of summers left. But, there are ways to double or triple that amount of time.

It's a bit like buying a small chunk of immortality.
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Old 11-17-2017, 05:11 AM
 
Location: Uptown Phoenix, AZ
5,104 posts, read 4,544,394 times
Reputation: 4516
Quote:
Originally Posted by popwar View Post
Your ideal dream climate . Nothing would make your life better than living where you're most comfortable. Have you moved simply for this reason? Or atleast 90% of it? How has this decision affected your life? What do you like most about your new perfect climate home ?
I have highly considered it. But the places that have the best weather, in my opinion, fall short on other criteria. Phoenix summers are brutal and I actually get summer depression every year because of it. Every year I consider moving away, but there's always something holding me back.

I think Santa Fe, New Mexico has the best climate:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Santa_...Mexico#Climate

It's dry and cold but doesn't snow that much. Still snows though, which is nice. I visited Santa Fe last year for a short vacation and also to see if I liked it for a potential move. I felt that I might like Santa Fe because it was similar to Flagstaff, Arizona. Flagstaff is my favorite place in the country and always had enjoyable weather except I felt the winters were way too snowy and me and snow don't get along in huge amounts like Flagstaff.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flagst...rizona#Climate

Santa Fe and Flagstaff are practically the same as far as temperatures, minus the differences in precipitation and humidity, which makes Santa Fe a desert and Flagstaff...not.

Loved Santa Fe when I visited, but I had deathly allergies there, and I don't think I could live in a city as small as Santa Fe. It is expensive there, and there are few jobs.

Denver comes close but gets a bit hotter in the summer and has colder, snowier winters:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Denver#Climate

Albuquerque comes close but gets hotter in the summer and slightly warmer and less snowy winters:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albuqu...Mexico#Climate

Albuquerque is more ideal than Denver I think, but Albuquerque also has the issue with allergies and few jobs. Denver I'm not sure would give me terrible allergies, but is in a better economic situation.
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Old 11-17-2017, 06:42 AM
 
370 posts, read 234,652 times
Reputation: 443
I prefer the hot & humid Southeastern US climate vs. the snow & cold of other areas. When you get hot, you go inside, get a cold drink, strip off some clothes, crank up the a/c & sit under a ceiling fan. In a few minutes, you're refreshed & ready for more.

Compare this to living in a colder climate, like the northeast & their winters: You drudge in from the cold & snow, another grey, overcast day. You take off all of your soaked snow gear & find some dry clothes. You're chilled to the bone. Still, sitting in front of the fireplace with a blanket wrapped around you and a warm drink seems to do nothing to warm you up. It takes hours before you feel human again.

There is a reason why so many from up north choose to move to my neck of the woods...
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Old 11-17-2017, 06:50 AM
 
4,415 posts, read 2,814,853 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 843904 View Post
I prefer the hot & humid Southeastern US climate vs. the snow & cold of other areas. When you get hot, you go inside, get a cold drink, strip off some clothes, crank up the a/c & sit under a ceiling fan. In a few minutes, you're refreshed & ready for more.

Compare this to living in a colder climate, like the northeast & their winters: You drudge in from the cold & snow, another grey, overcast day. You take off all of your soaked snow gear & find some dry clothes. You're chilled to the bone. Still, sitting in front of the fireplace with a blanket wrapped around you and a warm drink seems to do nothing to warm you up. It takes hours before you feel human again.

There is a reason why so many from up north choose to move to my neck of the woods...
My thoughts exactly! I'd rather mow the lawn once a week (usually less) than deal with shoveling and chipping ice daily - in the dark no less. My back hall and kitchen floors are a non-stop mess even with throw rugs and removing shoes, simply because my entrance is north and gets zero sun in the winter. It is ALWAYS wet out there. Once I am chilled deep inside it's so hard to get warm again (and yes I have great clothes for those who always insist that's the problem!)

I don't even have a fireplace or wood stove. Winters are a special kind of hell.
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Old 11-17-2017, 07:45 AM
 
Location: Mount Juliet, TN
176 posts, read 151,587 times
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Yep.. making the move from Houston to Nashville with one of the primary reasons being weather/seasons. 17 years down here and I miss the occasional snow/ice storm of my childhood in northern Oklahoma. I miss seeing the leaves change color, the raking of leaves, he desire to sit in front of a crackling fire. Heck.. since it is that time of year, for 17 years Thanksgiving and Christmas hasn't felt right. Sorry.. it will never feel like Christmas when I'm walking outside in shorts!!!

Another factor for the move related to weather is outdoor activities. As our kids are getting older, they want to do more camping, kayaking, fishing, etc. and I feel like a more varied climate will help with that. Here in Houston, I can't really stand going camping (tents, no AC.. not "glamping" in a cabin or air conditioned RV) until after October and by around April the camping gear gets packed away. I miss going camping in the cold, we would regularly take weekend camping trips when I was a kid in 45 and below.. not to mention backpacking trips to the mountains and hiking in the snow.

I'm one of the odd ducks that would rather shovel snow once a week than mow the yard once a week. Coming in from the heat all I want to do is lay on the floor and die. Taking clothes off, running cold wash cloths over my face and neck, and cranking the AC eventually cools me down.. but then I think that I still have to go get in my 110 degree car and run to the grocery store and just want to cry.

My ideal location would be somewhere in the mountains where a snow storm would basically trap me at home. Being "snowed in" a couple times a year (as long as I still have power) sounds wonderful. Nashville will be a "stepping stone" until our kids are grown. It's a baby step with more land (1/2 acre vs 7000 sq ft now), a little more rural, and getting back to cooler weather in the winter. Hopefully the next step after they are grown will be a couple acres in the mountains
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Old 11-17-2017, 07:48 AM
 
Location: Southern New Hampshire
8,377 posts, read 14,475,215 times
Reputation: 27089
Quote:
Originally Posted by craigiri View Post
We have three houses - and, yep, we move back and forth to take advantage of the weather. We'll be headed to Sarasota in mid-Dec...

Being retired there is a calculation to make. You only have X number of summers left. But, there are ways to double or triple that amount of time.

It's a bit like buying a small chunk of immortality.
Except not everyone likes summer weather! It would feel like TORTURE to me to have "summer" 12 months a year.

I have never moved anywhere JUST for the climate. It's simply not a big factor. I currently live in New Hampshire and will likely retire here or in Maine (OR in England/Scotland/Wales if I can manage it -- dual citizen, but I might miss the U.S. too much). The cold weather doesn't bother me in the least -- in fact, late fall (like now) is probably my favorite season. The air is cold and crisp and refreshing and it just, well, makes me feel happy (as silly as that may sound ) when I go out and take a walk and feel the cold on my face.

I wouldn't want to live in a hot climate, although I would if there were reasons to move there (e.g. my SO loved it).
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Old 11-17-2017, 08:16 AM
 
20,975 posts, read 6,363,939 times
Reputation: 13966
Quote:
Originally Posted by karen_in_nh_2012 View Post
Except not everyone likes summer weather! It would feel like TORTURE to me to have "summer" 12 months a year.

I have never moved anywhere JUST for the climate. It's simply not a big factor. I currently live in New Hampshire and will likely retire here or in Maine (OR in England/Scotland/Wales if I can manage it -- dual citizen, but I might miss the U.S. too much). The cold weather doesn't bother me in the least -- in fact, late fall (like now) is probably my favorite season. The air is cold and crisp and refreshing and it just, well, makes me feel happy (as silly as that may sound ) when I go out and take a walk and feel the cold on my face.

I wouldn't want to live in a hot climate, although I would if there were reasons to move there (e.g. my SO loved it).
Two of the houses are in New England - one coastal, which is a different climate than inland,

The third is on Florida's Gulf Coast, but we are there Dec-April 1, a time when we often don't even need A/C.

I don't like hot weather either - our summers here near Newport, RI are 75 during the day and 60 at night with a strong breeze.
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Old 11-17-2017, 08:36 AM
 
Location: Live:Downtown Phoenix, AZ/Work:Greater Los Angeles, CA
24,823 posts, read 9,660,623 times
Reputation: 8089
Quote:
Originally Posted by farscapesg01 View Post
Yep.. making the move from Houston to Nashville with one of the primary reasons being weather/seasons. 17 years down here and I miss the occasional snow/ice storm of my childhood in northern Oklahoma. I miss seeing the leaves change color, the raking of leaves, he desire to sit in front of a crackling fire. Heck.. since it is that time of year, for 17 years Thanksgiving and Christmas hasn't felt right. Sorry.. it will never feel like Christmas when I'm walking outside in shorts!!!

Another factor for the move related to weather is outdoor activities. As our kids are getting older, they want to do more camping, kayaking, fishing, etc. and I feel like a more varied climate will help with that. Here in Houston, I can't really stand going camping (tents, no AC.. not "glamping" in a cabin or air conditioned RV) until after October and by around April the camping gear gets packed away. I miss going camping in the cold, we would regularly take weekend camping trips when I was a kid in 45 and below.. not to mention backpacking trips to the mountains and hiking in the snow.

I'm one of the odd ducks that would rather shovel snow once a week than mow the yard once a week. Coming in from the heat all I want to do is lay on the floor and die. Taking clothes off, running cold wash cloths over my face and neck, and cranking the AC eventually cools me down.. but then I think that I still have to go get in my 110 degree car and run to the grocery store and just want to cry.

My ideal location would be somewhere in the mountains where a snow storm would basically trap me at home. Being "snowed in" a couple times a year (as long as I still have power) sounds wonderful. Nashville will be a "stepping stone" until our kids are grown. It's a baby step with more land (1/2 acre vs 7000 sq ft now), a little more rural, and getting back to cooler weather in the winter. Hopefully the next step after they are grown will be a couple acres in the mountains
Per the bolded, I will never understand this. Most of the places that celebrate Christmas are in the southern hemisphere (where it is summer then, they don't celebrate Christmas in June just so it's winter), or in the tropics. And "Jesus and the three wise men" were from Israel, which has a similar climate to California
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Old 11-17-2017, 10:45 AM
 
Location: Mount Juliet, TN
176 posts, read 151,587 times
Reputation: 345
Quote:
Originally Posted by FirebirdCamaro1220 View Post
Per the bolded, I will never understand this. Most of the places that celebrate Christmas are in the southern hemisphere (where it is summer then, they don't celebrate Christmas in June just so it's winter), or in the tropics. And "Jesus and the three wise men" were from Israel, which has a similar climate to California
From a spiritual aspect, I agree, it doesn't matter. From the side relating to Santa, Christmas trees, reindeer, etc., you don't usually see images of him flying around in surf shorts, the stores don't usually decorate in beach themes, and we don't decorate a palm tree in the living room Look at the Christmas songs, you have Winter Wonderland, Jingle Bells, etc. talking about snow, cold, sleighs, and so on... not about surfing, getting a tan or any other "summer" activities.

For me, growing up in Oklahoma (and probably the same for most people not on the southern coastal areas of the US), Christmas time is winter. Snow, hot cocoa, pine/spruce trees (we did cedars since we had plenty on our land). I get that the time of year isn't winter for everyone.. but when you throw in music, holiday movies (trying to imagine Charlie Brown playing on a beach vs building a snowman, or Frosty being a starfish on South Padre beach but it isn't happening), and decorations.. the general feel for Christmas, at least in the USA, is winter.

Sorry for going off-topic.. but that was part of our desire to move.. the weather from having having 4 distinct seasons, including what I personally desire for holidays (4th of July should be hot, Halloween should be starting to cool off where you don't die of heat from wearing heavier costumes, Christmas/New Years should be cold, Easter should be just starting to warm up and looking forward to Spring, etc.).
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