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Old 05-07-2018, 07:17 AM
B87
 
Location: Surrey/London
11,656 posts, read 8,263,166 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fluffydelusions View Post
So practically non existent? We had thundersnow a year ago and I remember hearing some thunder very briefly a couple years ago but nothing like the east coast of the US.
UK gets a lot more than the PNW.
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Old 05-07-2018, 08:19 AM
 
Location: Segovia, central Spain, 1230 m asl, Csb Mediterranean with strong continental influence, 40º43 N
3,038 posts, read 2,777,375 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
Your seas off the south coast of Spain outside the Med are not warm at all. Low 70's at best which is similar to what San Diego gets in summer. Your Med side is where the warm water is cause it is basically and enclosed bathtub that heats up from solar energy not ocean currents like off our coast from the Gulf Stream. And I don't think oceans have much to do with it. Look at the great plains here. No ocean, they get way more thunderstorms than anywhere in Europe.
Although I am talking about the least thundery area of Spain and Portugal, still the southernmost and westernmost coast of the Iberian peninsula experience sligthly more thunderstorms than US' West coast all year round.
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Old 05-07-2018, 07:02 PM
 
Location: Buenos Aires and La Plata, ARG
2,338 posts, read 1,957,331 times
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lol, Wunderground read us?

https://www.wunderground.com/news/20...sala-2013-2017
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Old 05-08-2018, 06:43 AM
 
Location: Czech Republic, Polabí area.
47 posts, read 24,504 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
Your seas off the south coast of Spain outside the Med are not warm at all. Low 70's at best which is similar to what San Diego gets in summer. Your Med side is where the warm water is cause it is basically and enclosed bathtub that heats up from solar energy not ocean currents like off our coast from the Gulf Stream. And I don't think oceans have much to do with it. Look at the great plains here. No ocean, they get way more thunderstorms than anywhere in Europe.
San Diego is further south (32° north or Northwest Morocco) than entire Iberia. So Iberia is closer to the Jet stream and mid-latitude circulation generally. I think there is even better overlap of necessary ingredients like moisture and lapse rates (like in the Great plains and Midwest) + rough topography that support lift of moist air masses from Medi. and Atlantic.

Just compare average SST´s in European Atlantic with North American Pacific at similar latitudes. Same SST is displaced further north in Atlantic than in Pacific. In addition Azores high is not as strong as Pacific counterpart (North Pacific high).

https://www.seatemperature.org/europe/
https://www.seatemperature.org/north...united-states/

Quote:
Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
Lol, the desert of NM and AZ get more thunderstorms than anywhere in Spain also. No warm ocean close by.
Gulf od Mexico and California doesn't count? I thought that these bodies of water play crucial role in Southwestern monsoon.
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Old 05-08-2018, 08:26 AM
 
Location: Segovia, central Spain, 1230 m asl, Csb Mediterranean with strong continental influence, 40º43 N
3,038 posts, read 2,777,375 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nameless42 View Post
San Diego is further south (32° north or Northwest Morocco) than entire Iberia. So Iberia is closer to the Jet stream and mid-latitude circulation generally. I think there is even better overlap of necessary ingredients like moisture and lapse rates (like in the Great plains and Midwest) + rough topography that support lift of moist air masses from Medi. and Atlantic.
This is an example how the mid-latitude circulation plus our rough topography plus air masses from Med and Atlantic work during summer by fueling thunderstorms in the Iberian peninsula. Let's see this loop from 8 June 2017:

http://usuarios.tiempo.com/forero010...at24%20vis.gif

This is the lightning radar for that day:
http://images.meteociel.fr/im/6763/I...92046_qlv0.jpg

So, we can see a weak cold front coming from the west and low clouds in the northeast coming from warm moisture of the Med sea given by light easterlies winds.
Once both masses met in the mountain ranges of central-northern Spain, then a massive thunderstorm began, which left big hail and severe wind gusts.

Such kind of 'battle of masses' can occur next to the eastern coast along the pre-coastal mountain ranges as well, such as the two loops located below from 4 September 2014 and
9 September 2014:

http://images.meteociel.fr/im/2467/B...gimgs_jsq2.gif

http://images.meteociel.fr/im/5888/09092014img_bti8.gif

Summer is our dry season, yet the facts mentioned above make northern and eastern Iberian peninsula (and most of southern Europe) more prone to summer thunderstorms than, say, California or Chile.
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Old 05-08-2018, 06:40 PM
 
Location: Seattle area
7,459 posts, read 9,665,809 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fluffydelusions View Post
So practically non existent? We had thundersnow a year ago and I remember hearing some thunder very briefly a couple years ago but nothing like the east coast of the US.
Speaking of that, there are a few thunderstorms right now.
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Old 05-12-2018, 11:48 AM
 
Location: Austin, TX
11,753 posts, read 10,526,545 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
Lol, the desert of NM and AZ get more thunderstorms than anywhere in Spain also. No warm ocean close by.
That's because of the monsoon season which creeps up from Mexico that time of year.
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Old 05-12-2018, 01:28 PM
 
1,616 posts, read 901,548 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Botev1912 View Post
Speaking of that, there are a few thunderstorms right now.
Not here
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Old Today, 05:44 PM
 
Location: Alexandria, Louisiana
4,598 posts, read 3,426,101 times
Reputation: 1039
Vaisala's 2019 lightning report is out. Looks like it was an active year in the Plains. Less active in the Southeast compared to the 5 yr average.

Here's a link to the report & maps. https://www.vaisala.com/en/system/fi...ort-2019_0.pdf

Top 10 states in 2019 for lightning density:

1. Florida
2. Oklahoma
3. Missouri
4. Texas
5. Louisiana
6. Kansas
7. Illinois
8. Arkansas
9. Mississippi
10. District of Columbia
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