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Old 06-23-2019, 09:53 AM
 
Location: Toronto
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80F heat index is my exact threshold between 'hot' and 'not hot'.

Although if I'm doing any kind of exercise, 70F or higher with sunshine does feel hot.
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Old 06-23-2019, 10:18 AM
 
Location: Seattle area
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe90 View Post
It depends whether the sun is shining, or not - with full sun, even the 60s can feel hot
True, I was in San Diego in May when it was in the 60s and sunny almost every day. It felt very warm in the sun and cool in shade.
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Old 06-23-2019, 10:24 AM
 
Location: Top of the South, NZ
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Originally Posted by Botev1912 View Post
True, I was in San Diego in May when it was in the 60s and sunny almost every day. It felt very warm in the sun and cool in shade.
I don't think sun is factored into any sort of heat index, yet we all know the sensation of the sun disappearing behind a cloud.
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Old 06-23-2019, 10:39 AM
 
Location: Northern Virginia
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No temperature measurements take direct sun exposure into account because it would be by default an unreliable measurement.
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Old 06-23-2019, 10:53 AM
 
Location: Top of the South, NZ
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Originally Posted by Veritas Vincit View Post
No temperature measurements take direct sun exposure into account because it would be by default an unreliable measurement.
Not including sunlight can make a nonsense of heat indexes though -an example would be an online forecast that includes a "feels like" temperature, being made completely redundant by the presence/absence of strong sun

About the hottest day I can remember here last summer, had a "feels like" temperature of 23C, an actual temperature of (around) 26C, yet was one of the most unpleasant days I've experienced for a while.
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Old 06-23-2019, 12:27 PM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
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For me the 60s are best, 65 perfect, so 70s are hot, 80s barely tolerable, and 90+ is stay inside with AC weather. Here we have had an odd spring, 92 one day, 82 the next, 62 the next. Now it’s officially summer, and it’s 54 and light drizzle today at nearly noon.
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Old 06-23-2019, 01:33 PM
 
Location: Arizona
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Only if it’s humid. Otherwise 70s 80s and even 90s can be nice if the humidity is low.
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Old 06-23-2019, 04:47 PM
 
Location: Downtown Phoenix, AZ
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70s not at all, 80s only if the dewpoint is 65°F+
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Old 06-23-2019, 05:18 PM
 
Location: Northern Virginia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe90 View Post
Not including sunlight can make a nonsense of heat indexes though -an example would be an online forecast that includes a "feels like" temperature, being made completely redundant by the presence/absence of strong sun

About the hottest day I can remember here last summer, had a "feels like" temperature of 23C, an actual temperature of (around) 26C, yet was one of the most unpleasant days I've experienced for a while.

I've never been a fan of the "feels like" temperatures and ignore them. There's a specific scientific standard for how to measure temperatures, everything else is just window dressing. They try to 'science' it up by using factors like humidity and wind, but it doesn't change the fact that "felt" temperature is going to be highly subjective and based on various circumstances that are extremely variable (a skinny person may not feel as hot as a heavy-set individual for example). It's a gimmick.



In general the idea that it's gonna be hotter when you're in the sun for any duration of time than it would be in the shade seems pretty widely held knowledge, and people can take that into consideration when planning their activities. So I don't think there's a big need here.
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Old 06-23-2019, 09:52 PM
 
Location: Top of the South, NZ
18,307 posts, read 15,400,161 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Veritas Vincit View Post
I've never been a fan of the "feels like" temperatures and ignore them. There's a specific scientific standard for how to measure temperatures, everything else is just window dressing. They try to 'science' it up by using factors like humidity and wind, but it doesn't change the fact that "felt" temperature is going to be highly subjective and based on various circumstances that are extremely variable (a skinny person may not feel as hot as a heavy-set individual for example). It's a gimmick.



In general the idea that it's gonna be hotter when you're in the sun for any duration of time than it would be in the shade seems pretty widely held knowledge, and people can take that into consideration when planning their activities. So I don't think there's a big need here.
There's no need at all -just making the point the sunshine is just as relevant as humidity for dramatically increasing the effect of temperature.

Wind is a little different imo, as windchill is more likely to be hazardous than humidity or sunshine alone
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